Chinese astrology

Chinese astrology is based on the traditional astronomy and calendars. The development of Chinese astrology is tied to that of astronomy, which came to flourish during the Han Dynasty (2nd century BC to 2nd century AD).

Chinese astrology has a close relation with Chinese philosophy (theory of the three harmony: heaven, earth, and water), and uses the principles of yin and yang and concepts that are not found in Western astrology, such as the Wu Xing teachings, the 10 Celestial stems, the 12 Earthly Branches, the lunisolar calendar (moon calendar and sun calendar), and the time calculation after year, month, day, and shichen (時辰)[1].

Background

Chinese astrology was elaborated during the Zhou dynasty (1046–256 BC) and flourished during the Han Dynasty (2nd century BC to 2nd century AD). During the Han period, the familiar elements of traditional Chinese culture—the Yin-Yang philosophy, the theory of the 5 elements, the concepts of Heaven and Earth, and Confucian morality—were brought together to formalize the philosophical principles of Chinese medicine and divination, astrology and alchemy.[2]

The 5 classical planets are associated with the Wu Xing:

According to Chinese astrology, a person's destiny can be determined by the position of the major planets at the person's birth along with the positions of the Sun, Moon, comets, the person's time of birth, and zodiac Sign. The system of the twelve-year cycle of animal signs was built from observations of the orbit of Jupiter (the Year Star; simplified Chinese: 岁星; traditional Chinese: 歳星; pinyin: Suìxīng). Following the orbit of Jupiter around the sun, Chinese astronomers divided the celestial circle into 12 sections, and rounded it to 12 years (from 11.86). Jupiter is associated with the constellation Sheti (simplified Chinese: 摄提; traditional Chinese: 攝提- Boötes) and is sometimes called Sheti.

A system of computing one's fate and destiny based on one's birthday, birth season, and birth hours, known as Zi Wei Dou Shu (simplified Chinese: 紫微斗数; traditional Chinese: 紫微斗數; pinyin: zǐwēidǒushù), or Purple Star Astrology, is still used regularly in modern-day Chinese astrology to divine one's fortune. The 28 Chinese constellations, Xiu (Chinese: 宿; pinyin: xìu), are quite different from Western constellations. For example, the Big Bear (Ursa Major) is known as Dou (Chinese: ; pinyin: dǒu); the belt of Orion is known as Shen (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: shēn), or the "Happiness, Fortune, Longevity" trio of demigods. The seven northern constellations are referred to as Xuan Wu (Chinese: 玄武; pinyin: xuánwǔ). Xuan Wu is also known as the spirit of the northern sky or the spirit of Water in Taoism belief.

In addition to astrological readings of the heavenly bodies, the stars in the sky form the basis of many fairy tales. For example, the Summer Triangle is the trio of the cowherd (Altair), the weaving maiden fairy (Vega), and the "tai bai" fairy (Deneb). The two forbidden lovers were separated by the silvery river (the Milky Way). Each year on the seventh day of the seventh month in the Chinese calendar, the birds form a bridge across the Milky Way. The cowherd carries their two sons (the two stars on each side of Altair) across the bridge to reunite with their fairy mother. The tai bai fairy acts as the chaperone of these two immortal lovers.

Chinese and East-Asian

Chinese astrology has a close relation with Chinese philosophy which the core values and concepts are originated from Taoism or "Tao".[3]:22,85,176

Luni-solar calendar

The 60-year cycle consists of two separate cycles interacting with each other. The first is the cycle of ten heavenly stems, namely the Five Elements (in order Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal, and Water) in their Yin and Yang forms.

The second is the cycle of the twelve zodiac animal signs (生肖 shēngxiào) or Earthly Branches. They are in order as follows: the Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster, Dog, and Pig. In Vietnam the Rabbit is replaced by the cat.

This combination creates the 60-year cycle due to the fewest number of years (least common multiple) it would take to get from Yang Wood Rat to its next iteration, which always starts with Yang Wood Rat and ends with Yin Water Pig. Since the zodiac animal cycle of 12 is divisible by two, every zodiac sign can occur only as either Yin or Yang: the Dragon is always yang, the Snake is always yin, etc. The current cycle began in 1984 (as shown in "Table of the sixty-year calendar" below).

When trying to traverse the lunisolar calendar, an easy rule to follow is that years that end in an even number are yang, those that end with an odd number are yin. The cycle proceeds as follows:

  • If the year ends in 0 it is Yang Metal.
  • If the year ends in 1 it is Yin Metal.
  • If the year ends in 2 it is Yang Water.
  • If the year ends in 3 it is Yin Water.
  • If the year ends in 4 it is Yang Wood.
  • If the year ends in 5 it is Yin Wood.
  • If the year ends in 6 it is Yang Fire.
  • If the year ends in 7 it is Yin Fire.
  • If the year ends in 8 it is Yang Earth.
  • If the year ends in 9 it is Yin Earth.

However, since the (traditional) Chinese zodiac follows the (lunisolar) Chinese calendar, the switch-over date is the Chinese New Year, not January 1 as in the Gregorian calendar. Therefore, a person who was born in January or early February may have the sign of the previous year. For example, if a person was born in January 1970, his or her element would still be Yin Earth, not Yang Metal. Similarly, although 1990 was called the year of the Horse, anyone born from January 1 to January 26, 1990, was in fact born in the Year of the Snake (the sign of the previous year), because the 1990 Year of the Horse did not begin until January 27, 1990. For this reason, many online sign calculators (and Chinese restaurant place mats) may give a person the wrong sign if he/she was born in January or early February.

The start of a new zodiac is also celebrated on Chinese New Year along with many other customs.

Table of the sixty-year calendar

The following table shows the 60-year cycle matched up to the Western calendar for the years 1924–2043 (see sexagenary cycle article for years 1804–1923). This is only applied to Chinese Lunar calendar. The sexagenary cycle begins at lichun 'about February 4' according to some astrological sources.[4] Each of the Chinese lunar years are associated with a combination of the ten Heavenly Stems (Chinese: 天干; pinyin: tiāngān) and the twelve Earthly Branches (Chinese: 地支; pinyin: dìzhī) which make up the 60 Stem-Branches (Chinese: 干支; pinyin: gānzhī) in a sexagenary cycle.

  Year Associated
Element
Heavenly
Stem
Earthly
Branch
Stem-Branch

(干支) in Pinyin

Associated
Animal
Year
1924–1983 1984–2043
1 Feb 05 1924–Jan 23 1925 Yang Wood jiǎ-zǐ Rat Feb 02 1984–Jan 21 1985
2 Jan 24 1925–Feb 12 1926 Yin Wood yǐ-chǒu Ox Jan 22 1985–Feb 08 1986
3 Feb 13 1926–Feb 01 1927 Yang Fire bǐng-yín Tiger Feb 09 1986–Jan 28 1987
4 Feb 02 1927–Jan 22 1928 Yin Fire dīng-mǎo Rabbit Jan 29 1987–Feb 16 1988
5 Jan 23 1928–Feb 09 1929 Yang Earth wù-chén Dragon Feb 17 1988–Feb 05 1989
6 Feb 10 1929–Jan 29 1930 Yin Earth jǐ-sì Snake Feb 06 1989–Jan 26 1990
7 Jan 30 1930–Feb 16 1931 Yang Metal gēng-wǔ Horse Jan 27 1990–Feb 14 1991
8 Feb 17 1931–Feb 05 1932 Yin Metal xīn-wèi Goat Feb 15 1991–Feb 03 1992
9 Feb 06 1932–Jan 25 1933 Yang Water rén-shēn Monkey Feb 04 1992–Jan 22 1993
10 Jan 26 1933–Feb 13 1934 Yin Water guǐ-yǒu Rooster Jan 23 1993– Feb 09 1994
11 Feb 14 1934–Feb 03 1935 Yang Wood jiǎ-xū Dog Feb 10 1994–Jan 30 1995
12 Feb 04 1935–Jan 23 1936 Yin Wood yǐ-hài Pig Jan 31 1995–Feb 18 1996
13 Jan 24 1936–Feb 10 1937 Yang Fire bǐng-zǐ Rat Feb 19 1996–Feb 06 1997
14 Feb 11 1937–Jan 30 1938 Yin Fire dīng-chǒu Ox Feb 07 1997–Jan 27 1998
15 Jan 31 1938–Feb 18 1939 Yang Earth wù-yín Tiger Jan 28 1998–Feb 15 1999
16 Feb 19 1939–Feb 07 1940 Yin Earth jǐ-mǎo Rabbit Feb 16 1999–Feb 04 2000
17 Feb 08 1940–Jan 26 1941 Yang Metal gēng-chén Dragon Feb 05 2000–Jan 23 2001
18 Jan 27 1941–Feb 14 1942 Yin Metal xīn-sì Snake Jan 24 2001–Feb 11 2002
19 Feb 15 1942–Feb 04 1943 Yang Water rén-wǔ Horse Feb 12 2002–Jan 31 2003
20 Feb 05 1943–Jan 24 1944 Yin Water guǐ-wèi Goat Feb 01 2003–Jan 21 2004
21 Jan 25 1944–Feb 12 1945 Yang Wood jiǎ-shēn Monkey Jan 22 2004–Feb 08 2005
22 Feb 13 1945–Feb 01 1946 Yin Wood yǐ-yǒu Rooster Feb 09 2005–Jan 28 2006
23 Feb 02 1946–Jan 21 1947 Yang Fire bǐng-xū Dog Jan 29 2006–Feb 17 2007
24 Jan 22 1947–Feb 09 1948 Yin Fire dīng-hài Pig Feb 18 2007–Feb 06 2008
25 Feb 10 1948–Jan 28 1949 Yang Earth wù-zǐ Rat Feb 07 2008–Jan 25 2009
26 Jan 29 1949–Feb 16 1950 Yin Earth jǐ-chǒu Ox Jan 26 2009–Feb 13 2010
27 Feb 17 1950–Feb 05 1951 Yang Metal gēng-yín Tiger Feb 14 2010–Feb 02 2011
28 Feb 06 1951–Jan 26 1952 Yin Metal xīn-mǎo Rabbit Feb 03 2011–Jan 22 2012
29 Jan 27 1952–Feb 13 1953 Yang Water rén-chén Dragon Jan 23 2012–Feb 09 2013
30 Feb 14 1953–Feb 02 1954 Yin Water guǐ-sì Snake Feb 10 2013–Jan 30 2014
31 Feb 03 1954–Jan 23 1955 Yang Wood jiǎ-wǔ Horse Jan 31 2014–Feb 18 2015
32 Jan 24 1955–Feb 11 1956 Yin Wood yǐ-wèi Goat Feb 19 2015–Feb 07 2016
33 Feb 12 1956–Jan 30 1957 Yang Fire bǐng-shēn Monkey Feb 08 2016–Jan 27 2017
34 Jan 31 1957–Feb 17 1958 Yin Fire dīng-yǒu Rooster Jan 28 2017–Feb 15 2018
35 Feb 18 1958–Feb 07 1959 Yang Earth wù-xū Dog Feb 16 2018–Feb 04 2019
36 Feb 08 1959–Jan 27 1960 Yin Earth jǐ-hài Pig Feb 05 2019–Jan 24 2020
37 Jan 28 1960–Feb 14 1961 Yang Metal gēng-zǐ Rat Jan 25 2020–Feb. 11 2021
38 Feb 15 1961–Feb 04 1962 Yin Metal xīn-chǒu Ox Feb 12 2021–Jan 31 2022
39 Feb 05 1962–Jan 24 1963 Yang Water rén-yín Tiger Feb 01 2022–Jan 21 2023
40 Jan 25 1963–Feb 12 1964 Yin Water guǐ-mǎo Rabbit Jan 22 2023–Feb 09 2024
41 Feb 13 1964–Feb 01 1965 Yang Wood jiǎ-chén Dragon Feb 10 2024–Jan 28 2025
42 Feb 02 1965–Jan 20 1966 Yin Wood yǐ-sì Snake Jan 29 2025–Feb 16 2026
43 Jan 21 1966–Feb 08 1967 Yang Fire bǐng-wǔ Horse Feb 17 2026–Feb 05 2027
44 Feb 09 1967–Jan 29 1968 Yin Fire dīng-wèi Goat Feb 06 2027–Jan 25 2028
45 Jan 30 1968–Feb 16 1969 Yang Earth wù-shēn Monkey Jan 26 2028–Feb 12 2029
46 Feb 17 1969–Feb 05 1970 Yin Earth jǐ-yǒu Rooster Feb 13 2029–Feb 02 2030
47 Feb 06 1970–Jan 26 1971 Yang Metal gēng-xū Dog Feb 03 2030–Jan 22 2031
48 Jan 27 1971–Feb 14 1972 Yin Metal xīn-hài Pig Jan 23 2031–Feb 10 2032
49 Feb 15 1972–Feb 02 1973 Yang Water rén-zǐ Rat Feb 11 2032–Jan 30 2033
50 Feb 03 1973–Jan 22 1974 Yin Water guǐ-chǒu Ox Jan 31 2033–Feb 18 2034
51 Jan 23 1974–Feb 10 1975 Yang Wood jiǎ-yín Tiger Feb 19 2034–Feb 07 2035
52 Feb 11 1975–Jan 30 1976 Yin Wood yǐ-mǎo Rabbit Feb 08 2035–Jan 27 2036
53 Jan 31 1976–Feb 17 1977 Yang Fire bǐng-chén Dragon Jan 28 2036–Feb 14 2037
54 Feb 18 1977–Feb 06 1978 Yin Fire dīng-sì Snake Feb 15 2037–Feb 03 2038
55 Feb 07 1978–Jan 27 1979 Yang Earth wù-wǔ Horse Feb 04 2038–Jan 23 2039
56 Jan 28 1979–Feb 15 1980 Yin Earth jǐ-wèi Goat Jan 24 2039–Feb 11 2040
57 Feb 16 1980–Feb 04 1981 Yang Metal gēng-shēn Monkey Feb 12 2040–Jan 31 2041
58 Feb 05 1981–Jan 24 1982 Yin Metal xīn-yǒu Rooster Feb 01 2041–Jan 21 2042
59 Jan 25 1982–Feb 12 1983 Yang Water rén-xū Dog Jan 22 2042–Feb 09 2043
60 Feb 13 1983–Feb 01 1984 Yin Water guǐ-hài Pig Feb 10 2043–Jan 29 2044

Wu Xing

Although it is usually translated as 'element' the Chinese word xing literally means something like 'changing states of being', 'permutations' or 'metamorphoses of being'.[5] In fact, Sinologists cannot agree on one single translation. The Chinese conception of 'element' is therefore quite different from the Western one. The Western elements were seen as the basic building blocks of matter. The Chinese 'elements', by contrast, were seen as ever changing and translation of xing is simply 'the five changes'.

木 Wood

火 Fire

土 Earth

金 Metal

水 Water

Wu Xing Generating Cycle (生 sheng)[6]

(Inter-promoting, begetting, engendering, mothering or enhancing cycle) Generating: Wood makes Fire burn; Fire creates Earth; Earth bears Metal; Off of Metal runs the Water; Water makes Wood grow.

Wu Xing Controlling Cycle (克 kè)

(Destructing, overcoming or inter-restraining or weakening cycle) Fire melts Metal; Metal chops down Wood; Wood breaks the Earth; Earth soaks up Water and blocks its flow; Water controls Fire.

Zang-fu

Logical coherence with twelve things.

Zodiac Tiger Rabbit Dragon Snake Horse Sheep Monkey Phoenix Dog Cat (Pig) Rat Ox
Zang-fu Fei Da Chang Wei Pi Xin Xiao Chang Pang Guang Shen Xin Bao San Jiao Dan Gan
Greek 12 Olympians Hera Zeus Poseidon Ceres Diana Apollo Ares Athena Aphrodite Hermes Dionysus Vesta
360o 150-180 180-210 210-240 240-270 270-300 300-330 330-360 0-30 30-60 60-90 90-120 120-150

See also

References

  1. ^ "Ancient Chinese Astrology – What Sign Are You?; secretserendipity.com". Secret Serendipity. 2017-04-13. Retrieved 2017-11-13.
  2. ^ Xiaochun Sun, Jacob Kistemaker, The Chinese sky during the Han: constellating stars and society, pp.3-4. BRILL, 1997. ISBN 978-90-04-10737-3
  3. ^ Kistemaker, Jacob, Sun, Xiaochun (1997). The Chinese sky during the Han: constellating stars and society. Leiden: Brill. ISBN 978-90-04-10737-3.
  4. ^ ""Almanac" "lunar" zodiac beginning of spring as the boundary dislocation? — China Network". 16 February 2009. Retrieved 5 January 2011.
  5. ^ Wolfram Eberhard, A Dictionary of Chinese Symbols, p. 93, p. 105, p. 309, Routledge and Keegan Paul, London, 1986
  6. ^ "Five Elements(Wu Xing)". YourChineseAstrology.com.

Sources

  • Shelly Wu. (2005). Chinese Astrology. Publisher: The Career Press, Inc. ISBN 1-56414-796-7
Astrology and the classical elements

Astrology has used the concept of classical elements from antiquity up until the present. In Western astrology and Indian astrology four elements are used: Fire, Earth, Air, and Water.

Chinese zodiac

The Chinese zodiac is a classification scheme that assigns an animal and its reputed attributes to each year in a repeating 12-year cycle. The 12-year cycle is an approximation to the 11.85-year orbital period of Jupiter. It and its variations remain popular in many Asian countries and regions including China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Macao, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, Mongolia, Cambodia, Laos, Nepal, Bhutan, and Thailand.

The Chinese zodiac is also called Shēngxiào (生肖) in Mandarin. Identifying this scheme using the generic term "zodiac" reflects several superficial similarities to the Western zodiac: both have time cycles divided into 12 parts, each labels at least the majority of those parts with names of animals, and each is widely associated with a culture of ascribing a person's personality or events in his or her life to the supposed influence of the person's particular relationship to the cycle.

Nevertheless, there are major differences between the two: the animals of the Chinese zodiac are not associated with constellations spanned by the ecliptic plane. The Chinese 12-part cycle corresponds to years, rather than months. The Chinese zodiac is represented by 12 animals, whereas some of the signs in the Western zodiac are not animals, despite the implication of the etymology of the word zodiac.

Cosmic year (Chinese astrology)

According to Jeung San Do, the universe generates and cultivates life through a cyclic process of birth, growth, harvest, and rest (生長殮藏). This is closely related to the fluctuation and interplay of the two polar energies, yin and yang and its cycle appeared in daily, yearly, and cosmically. 129,600 calendar years make up one Cosmic year and it was discovered by Shao Yung.

Earthly Branches

The twelve Earthly Branches or Terrestrial Branches are an ordering system used throughout East Asia in various contexts, including its ancient dating system, astrological traditions, and zodiac.

Hinoe uma

Hinoe uma (Japanese) or bing wu (Chinese; written in both 丙午, meaning "fire horse" in Chinese) is the 43rd combination of the sexagenary cycle. Due to the belief that people born on this year have a bad personality, birthrates in Japan tend to see a sharp decline.

Horse (zodiac)

The Horse (⾺) is the seventh of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. There is a long tradition of the Horse in Chinese mythology. Certain characteristics of the Horse nature are supposed to be typical of or to be associated with either a year of the Horse and its events, or in regard to the personality of someone born in such a year. Horse aspects can also enter by other chronomantic factors or measures, such as hourly.

Metal (Wu Xing)

Metal (Chinese: 金; pinyin: jīn), the fourth phase of the Chinese philosophy of Wu Xing, is the decline of the matter, or the matter's decline stage. Metal is yin in character, its motion is inwards and its energy is contracting. It is associated with the autumn, the west, old age, the planet Venus, the color white, dry weather, and the White Tiger (Bai Hu) in Four Symbols. The archetypal metals are silver and gold.

Pig (zodiac)

The Pig (豬) is the twelfth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in Chinese zodiac, in relation to the Chinese calendar and system of horology, and paralleling the system of ten Heavenly Stems and twelve Earthly Branches. Although the term "zodiac" (etymologically referring to a "[circle of] little animals") is used in the phrase "Chinese zodiac", there is a major difference between the Chinese usage and Western astrology: the zodiacal animals (including the zodiacal Pig) do not relate to the zodiac as the area of the sky that extends approximately 8° north or south (as measured in celestial latitude) of the ecliptic, the apparent path of the Sun, the Moon, and visible planets across the celestial sphere's constellations, over the course of the year.

In Chinese astrology, "zodiacal" animals refer to fixed cycles of twelve animals. The same cycle of twelve is used for cycles of years and cycles of hours. In the case of years, the cycle of twelve corresponds to the twelve-year cycle of Jupiter. In the case of the hours, the twelve hours represent twelve double-hours for each period of night and day. In the continuous sexagenary cycle of sixty years, every twelfth year corresponds to hai, 亥 (the twelfth of the twelve Earthly Branches); this re-recurring twelfth year is commonly called the Year of the Pig (豬年).

There are five types of Pigs, named after the Chinese elements. In order, they are: Metal, Water, Wood, Fire, and Earth. These correspond to the Heavenly Stems. Thus, there are five pig years in every sexegenary cycle. For example, in the year 2019, the Earthly Branch is the twelfth, hài, and the Heavenly Stem is the sixth, jǐ 己. The Chinese New Year in 2019 is February fifth: this corresponds with the beginning of both the sexegenary year of jǐ hài and also the zodiac year of the Earth Pig.

In the Japanese zodiac and the Tibetan zodiac, the Pig is replaced by the boar. In the Dai zodiac, the Pig is replaced by the elephant. In the Gurung zodiac, the Pig is replaced by the deer.

Purple Forbidden enclosure

The Purple Forbidden enclosure (紫微垣 Zǐ wēi yuán) is one of the San Yuan (三垣 Sān yuán) or Three Enclosures. Stars and constellations of this group lie near the north celestial pole and are visible all year from temperate latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere.

Radical 102

Radical 102 (田 Unicode U+7530 meaning "rice paddy" or "field") is number 102 out of 214 Kangxi radicals. It is one of 23 radicals composed of five strokes. With 192 signs derived from this character in the Kangxi dictionary, it has a frequency somewhat below average.

The character 田 is a pictograph of a rice field with irrigation channels. There are several variants of the radical, which may also have other meanings. Signs derived from this character mostly belong to the agricultural sphere, such as 亩, a unit of area, 男, a field worker, or 畜 "cattle".

In Chinese astrology, 申 represents the ninth Earthly Branch and corresponds to the Monkey in the Chinese zodiac. In other signs such as 钿 "coin", the radical has merely phonetic significance. In other cases, it is present due to assimilation of a similar but originally distinct radical, as in 胃 "stomach". In the ancient Chinese cyclic character numeral system tiāngān, 甲 represents the first Celestial stem.

Radical 161

Radical 161 meaning "morning" is 1 of 20 Kangxi radicals (214 radicals total) composed of 7 strokes.

In the Kangxi Dictionary there are 15 characters (out of 49,030) to be found under this radical.

In Chinese astrology, 辰 represents the fifth Earthly Branch and corresponds to the Dragon in the Chinese zodiac.

Radical 164

Radical 164 meaning "wine" or "alcohol" is 1 of 20 Kangxi radicals (214 radicals total) composed of 7 strokes.

In the Kangxi Dictionary there are 290 characters (out of 49,030) to be found under this radical.

In Chinese astrology, 酉 represents the tenth Earthly Branch and corresponds to the Rooster in the Chinese zodiac.

Radical 39

Radical 39 meaning "child" or "seed" is 1 of 31 Kangxi radicals (214 radicals total) composed of three strokes.

In the Kangxi Dictionary there are 83 characters (out of 49,030) to be found under this radical.

In Chinese astrology, 子 represents the first Earthly Branch and corresponds to the Rat in the Chinese zodiac.

Radical 49

Radical 49 meaning "oneself" is 1 of 31 Kangxi radicals (214 radicals total) composed of three strokes.

In the Kangxi Dictionary there are 20 characters (out of 49,030) to be found under this radical.

In Chinese astrology, 巳 represents the sixth Earthly Branch and corresponds to the Snake in the Chinese zodiac. In the ancient Chinese cyclic character numeral system tiāngān, 己 represents the sixth Celestial stem.

Sha Po Lang

Sha Po Lang (traditional Chinese: 殺破狼; simplified Chinese: 杀破狼; pinyin: Shā Pò Láng) is a collective term for three stars in Chinese astrology used in the Zi wei dou shu 紫微斗數 method of fortune-telling.

The three stars are:

Qi Sha (traditional Chinese: 七殺; simplified Chinese: 七杀; pinyin: Qī Shā; literally: 'Seven Killings'), symbolising power

Po Jun (traditional Chinese: 破軍; simplified Chinese: 破军; pinyin: Pò Jūn; literally: 'Vanquisher of Armies'), symbolising destruction

Tan Lang (traditional Chinese: 貪狼; simplified Chinese: 贪狼; pinyin: Tān Láng; literally: 'Greedy Wolf'), symbolising lust.

Symbolic stars

In Chinese astrology, the symbolic stars (Chinese: Shen Sha 神煞, pinyin: shén shā) represent different relations of the specific positions and interactions of the heavenly stems and earthly branches.

"The symbolic stars" is sometimes translated literally, as "gods and devils"; but in fact, the symbolic stars do not relate to any ghosts or celestial beings— in this case, "shen (神)" means beneficial influence, and "sha (煞)" means baneful influence of the cyclical signs of the heavenly stems and earthly branches.

The calculation of the symbolic stars is logically connected to the theory of Yin and Yang, Five Elements, Ten Gods theory, Na Yin melodic elements theory, Twelve Energy States, etc. The symbolic stars are like the “leaves” of the heavenly stems and earthly branches in the big tree of Chinese astrology and can provide a very specific information in the horoscope analysis.

The symbolic stars are used in many methods of Chinese astrology and metaphysics: Four Pillars of Destiny, Zi wei dou shu, Da Liu Ren, and Feng Shui.

In Chinese astrology, there are more than 180 symbolic stars.

Tibetan astrology

Tibetan astrology (Tibetan: དཀར་རྩིས, Wylie: dkar rtsis) is a traditional discipline of the Tibetan peoples that has dialogued with both Chinese astrology and Indian astrology. Tibetan astrology is one of the 'Ten Sciences' (Wylie: rig-pa'i gnas bcu; Sanskrit: daśavidyā) in the enumeration honoured by this cultural tradition.

Treatise on Astrology of the Kaiyuan Era

The Treatise on Astrology of the Kaiyuan Era is a Chinese astrology encyclopedia compiled by the lead editor Gautama Siddha and numerous scholars from 714 to 724 AD during the Kaiyuan era of Tang Dynasty. The compilation is attributed to the author by 729. Its full title is regarded as the Great Tang Treatise on Astrology of the Kaiyuan Era. It is also referred to as the Kaiyuan Star Observations.

Twenty-Eight Mansions

The Twenty-Eight Mansions (Chinese: 二十八宿; pinyin: Èrshíbā Xiù), hsiu, xiu or sieu are part of the Chinese constellations system. They can be considered as the equivalent to the zodiacal constellations in Western astronomy, though the Twenty-eight Mansions reflect the movement of the Moon through a sidereal month rather than the Sun in a tropical year.

The lunar mansion system was in use in other parts of East Asia, such as ancient Japan; the Bansenshukai, written by Fujibayashi Yasutake, mentions the system several times and includes an image of the twenty-eight mansions.Another similar system, called Nakshatra, is used in traditional Indian astronomy.

Core Zodiac Members
Other Zodiac Members

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