China women's national football team

The China women's national football team (Chinese: 中国国家女子足球队; pinyin: Zhōngguó Guójiā Nǚzǐ Zúqiú Duì), recognized as China PR by FIFA, is governed by the Chinese Football Association.[2] The team is colloquially referred to as "Zhōngguó Nǚzú" (Chinese: 中国女足, short for Chinese: 中国国家女子足球队; pinyin: Zhōngguó Guójiā Nǚzĭ Zúqiú Duì; literally: 'Chinese national women's football team').

China PR
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)铿锵玫瑰 Kēngqiāng Méiguī
(Steel Roses)
AssociationChinese Football Association
ConfederationAFC (Asia)
Sub-confederationEAFF (East Asia)
Head coachChina Jia Xiuquan
(Red/A team)
South Korea Park Tae-ha (Yellow/B team)
CaptainWu Haiyan
Most capsPu Wei (219)
Top scorerSun Wen (106)
FIFA codeCHN
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 16 Steady (12 July 2019)[1]
Highest4 (July 2003)
Lowest19 (August 2012)
First international
 United States 2–1 China PR 
(Jesolo, Italy; 20 July 1986)
Biggest win
 China PR 21–0 Philippines 
(Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia; 24 September 1995)
Biggest defeat
 Germany 8–0 China PR 
(Patras, Greece; 11 August 2004)
World Cup
Appearances7 (first in 1991)
Best resultRunners-up (1999)
Asian Cup
Appearances13 (first in 1986)
Best resultWinners (1986, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2006)

Honours

International

Continental

Regional

Competition history

FIFA Women's World Cup

FIFA Women's World Cup record
Year Result GP W D L GF GA GD
China 1991 Quarter-finals 4 2 1 1 10 4 +6
Sweden 1995 Fourth place 6 2 2 2 11 10 +1
United States 1999 Runners-up 6 5 1 0 19 2 +17
United States 2003 Quarter-finals 4 2 1 1 3 2 +1
China 2007 4 2 0 2 5 7 −2
Germany 2011 Did not qualify
Canada 2015 Quarter-finals 5 2 1 2 4 4 0
France 2019 Round of 16 4 1 1 2 1 3 −2
Total 7/8 33 16 7 10 53 32 +21
FIFA Women's World Cup history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
China 1991 Group stage 16 November  Norway W 4–0 Tianhe Stadium, Guangzhou
19 November  Denmark D 2–2 Guangdong Provincial Stadium, Guangzhou
21 November  New Zealand W 4–1 New Plaza Stadium, Foshan
Quarter-finals 24 November  Sweden L 0–1 Tianhe Stadium, Guangzhou
Sweden 1995 Group stage 6 June  United States D 3–3 Strömvallen, Gävle
8 June  Australia W 4–2 Arosvallen, Västerås
10 June  Denmark W 3–1
Quarter-finals 13 June  Sweden D 1–1 (4-3 pen) Olympia Stadion, Helsingborg
Semi-finals 15 June  Germany L 0–1
Third place play-off 17 June  United States L 0–2 Strömvallen, Gävle
United States 1999 Group stage 19 June  Sweden W 2–1 Spartan Stadium, San Jose
23 June  Ghana W 7–0 Civic Stadium, Portland
26 June  Australia W 3–1 Giants Stadium, East Rutherford
Quarter-finals 30 June  Russia W 2–0 Spartan Stadium, San Jose
Semi-finals 4 July  Norway W 5–0 Foxboro Stadium, Foxborough
Final 17 June  United States D 0–0 (4–5 pen) Rose Bowl, Pasadena
United States 2003 Group stage 21 September  Ghana W 1–0 The Home Depot Center, Carson
25 September  Australia D 1–1
28 September  Russia W 1–0 PGE Park, Portland
Quarter-finals 2 October  Canada L 0–1
China 2007 Group stage 12 September  Denmark W 3–2 Wuhan Stadium, Wuhan
15 September  Brazil L 0–4
20 September  New Zealand W 2–0 Tianjin Olympic Centre Stadium, Tianjin
Quarter-finals 23 September  Norway L 0–1 Wuhan Stadium, Wuhan
Canada 2015
Group stage 6 June  Canada L 0–1 Commonwealth Stadium, Edmonton
11 June  Netherlands W 1–0
15 June  New Zealand D 2–2 Winnipeg Stadium, Winnipeg
Round of 16 20 June  Cameroon W 1–0 Commonwealth Stadium, Edmonton
Quarter-finals 23 September  United States L 0–1 Lansdowne Stadium, Ottawa
France 2019 Group stage 8 June  Germany L 0–1 Roazhon Park, Rennes
13 June  South Africa W 1–0 Parc des Princes, Paris
17 June  Spain D 0–0 Stade Océane, Le Havre
Round of 16 25 June  Italy L 0–2 Stade de la Mosson, Montpellier

AFC Women's Asian Cup

AFC Women's Asian Cup record
Year Result GP W D L GF GA GD
Hong Kong 1975 Did not enter
Taiwan 1977
India 1979
Hong Kong 1981
Flag of Thailand (TIS 982 draft standard).svg 1983
Hong Kong 1986 Champions 4 4 0 0 23 0 +23
Hong Kong 1989 5 5 0 0 16 2 +14
Japan 1991 5 5 0 0 29 1 +28
Malaysia 1993 5 4 1 0 20 2 +18
Malaysia 1995 5 5 0 0 46 0 +46
China 1997 5 5 0 0 39 1 +38
Philippines 1999 6 6 0 0 47 2 +45
Chinese Taipei 2001 Third place 5 4 0 1 40 3 +37
Flag of Thailand (TIS 982 draft standard).svg 2003 Runners-up 5 4 0 1 33 3 +30
Australia 2006 Champions 5 3 1 1 7 3 +4
Vietnam 2008 Runners-up 5 3 0 2 10 5 +5
China 2010 Fourth place 5 2 1 2 6 3 +3
Vietnam 2014 Third place 5 3 1 1 13 3 +10
Jordan 2018 5 4 0 1 19 5 +14
Total 14/19 70 57 4 9 348 33 +315

Olympic Games

Olympic Games record
Year Result GP W D L GF GA GD
United States 1996 Runners-up 5 3 1 1 11 5 +6
Australia 2000 Group stage 3 1 1 1 5 4 +1
Greece 2004 2 0 1 1 1 9 −8
China 2008 Quarter-finals 4 2 1 1 5 4 +1
United Kingdom 2012 Did not qualify
Brazil 2016 Quarter-finals 4 1 1 2 2 4 −2
Japan 2020 TBD - - - - - - -
Total 4/6 18 7 5 6 24 26 –2

Algarve Cup

The Algarve Cup is a global invitational tournament for national teams in women's soccer hosted by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). Held annually in the Algarve region of Portugal since 1994, it is one of the most prestigious women's football events, alongside the Women's World Cup and Women's Olympic Football.

Portugal Algarve Cup
Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA GD
1994 Did not enter
1995
1996 Third place 4 3 0 1 9 5 4
1997 Runners-up 4 3 0 1 6 1 5
1998 5th place 4 3 0 1 6 5 1
1999 Champions 4 4 0 0 10 1 9
2000 Third place 4 3 0 1 9 4 5
2001 4 3 0 1 11 3 8
2002 Champions 4 4 0 0 10 3 7
2003 Runners-up 4 2 1 1 5 3 2
2004 6th place 4 1 2 1 5 2 3
2005 7th place 4 0 1 3 1 6 −5
2006 6th place 4 1 1 2 6 2 4
2007 10th place 4 0 0 4 2 9 −7
2008 9th place 4 0 1 3 2 10 −8
2009 5th place 4 2 1 1 3 4 −1
2010 Fourth place 4 1 1 2 3 8 −5
2011 7th place 4 1 0 3 3 5 −2
2012 9th place 4 1 0 3 1 3 −2
2013 6th place 4 1 1 2 2 7 −5
2014 5th place 4 1 1 2 2 3 −1
2015 12th place 4 0 2 2 3 8 −5
2016 Did not enter
2017 10th place 4 0 1 3 2 5 −3
2018 11th place 4 1 0 3 3 7 −4
Total 22/25 88 35 13 40 104 104 0

Asian Games

Asian Games record
Hosts / Year Result GP W D L GS GA GD
China 1990 Champions 5 5 0 0 26 0 +26
Japan 1994 4 3 1 0 10 1 +9
Flag of Thailand (TIS 982 draft standard).svg 1998 5 5 0 0 28 0 +28
South Korea 2002 Runners-up 5 3 2 0 11 3 +8
Qatar 2006 Third place 5 3 0 2 22 4 +18
China 2010 Fourth place 5 2 1 2 11 4 +7
South Korea 2014 5th place 4 2 1 1 9 1 +8
Indonesia 2018 Runners-up 6 5 0 1 31 1 +30
China 2022 TBD
Japan 2026 TBD
Total 8/8 39 28 5 6 149 14 +135

EAFF Women's Football Championship

EAFF Women's Football Championship record
Hosts / Year Result Pld W D L GF GA GD
South Korea 2005 Fourth place 3 0 1 2 0 3 −3
China 2008 Third place 3 1 1 1 3 5 −2
Japan 2010 Runners-up 3 2 0 1 5 3 2
South Korea 2013 Fourth place 6 4 0 2 12 5 7
China 2015 3 0 0 3 2 6 −4
Japan 2017 Third place 3 1 0 2 3 4 −1
South Korea 2019 TBD 3 3 0 0 18 0 18
Total 7/7 21 11 2 11 43 26 17

Team

Current squad

The following 23 players were named to the squad for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Caps and goals as of 25 June 2019 after match against  Italy.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 GK Xu Huan 6 March 1999 (aged 20) 1 0 China Beijing Phoenix
2 DF Liu Shanshan 16 March 1992 (aged 27) 114 1 China Beijing Phoenix
3 DF Lin Yuping 28 February 1992 (aged 27) 17 0 China Wuhan Jianghan University
4 MF Lou Jiahui 26 May 1991 (aged 28) 114 4 China Henan Huishang
5 DF Wu Haiyan 26 February 1993 (aged 26) 118 0 China Wuhan Jianghan University
6 DF Han Peng 20 December 1989 (aged 29) 97 4 China Guangdong Huijun
7 MF Wang Shuang 23 January 1995 (aged 24) 100 26 France Paris Saint-Germain
8 DF Li Jiayue 8 June 1990 (aged 28) 67 1 China Shanghai
9 FW Yang Li 31 January 1991 (aged 28) 63 31 China Jiangsu Suning
10 FW Li Ying 7 January 1993 (aged 26) 111 27 China Guangdong Huijun
11 FW Wang Shanshan 27 January 1990 (aged 29) 136 46 China Dalian Quanjian
12 GK Peng Shimeng 12 May 1998 (aged 21) 19 0 China Jiangsu Suning
13 MF Wang Yan 22 August 1991 (aged 27) 31 0 China Beijing Phoenix
14 DF Wang Ying 18 November 1997 (aged 21) 4 0 China Wuhan Jianghan University
15 FW Song Duan 2 August 1995 (aged 23) 25 7 China Dalian Quanjian
16 MF Li Wen 21 February 1989 (aged 30) 33 3 China Dalian Quanjian
17 MF Gu Yasha 28 November 1990 (aged 28) 121 13 China Beijing Phoenix
18 GK Bi Xiaolin 18 September 1989 (aged 29) 35 0 China Dalian Quanjian
19 MF Tan Ruyin 17 July 1994 (aged 24) 53 1 China Guangdong Huijun
20 MF Zhang Rui 17 January 1989 (aged 30) 149 24 China Changchun Zhuoyue
21 MF Yao Wei 1 September 1997 (aged 21) 18 3 China Wuhan Jianghan University
22 DF Luo Guiping 20 April 1993 (aged 26) 1 0 China Guangdong Huijun
23 MF Liu Yanqiu 31 December 1995 (aged 23) 2 0 China Wuhan Jianghan University

Statistics

Most capped players

As of 25 October 2015, the ten players with the most appearances for China are:
Pos Player Caps Career
1 Pu Wei 219 1997–2013
2 Li Jie 200 1997–2008
3 Fan Yunjie 192 1992–2004
4 Han Duan 188 2000–2011
5 Zhao Lihong 174 1992–2004
6 Wang Liping 173 1992–2004
7 Wen Lirong 170 1986–2001
8 Liu Yali 156 2000–2008
9 Sun Wen 152 1990–2005
9 Ma Xiaoxu 152 2005–present
10 Liu Ailing 150 1987–2000

Top goalscorers

As of 25 October 2015, the five highest goalscorers for China are:
Rank Player Goals Caps Career
1 Sun Wen 106 152 1990–2005
2 Han Duan 101 188 2000–2011
3 Bai Jie 83 139 1997–2003
4 Liu Ailing 80 150 1987–2000
5 Zhao Lihong 68 174 1992–2004

List of managers

Recent and forthcoming fixtures

Results list China's goal tally first.

Date Location Opponent Result Competition Scorers
17 August 2018 Palembang, Indonesia  Hong Kong 7–0 2018 Asian Games Wang Shanshan, Wang Shuang, Li Ying, Li Jiayue, Gu Yasha (2), Chan Wing Sze (o.g.)
20 August 2018 Palembang, Indonesia  Tajikistan 16–0 2018 Asian Games Wang Shanshan (9), Zhao Rong (5), Wang Shuang, Li Tingting
22 August 2018 Palembang, Indonesia  North Korea 2–0 2018 Asian Games Wang Shuang, Wang Shanshan
25 August 2018 Palembang, Indonesia  Thailand 5–0 2018 Asian Games Wang Shuang (3), Xiao Yuyi, Gu Yasha
28 August 2018 Palembang, Indonesia  Chinese Taipei 1–0 2018 Asian Games Wang Shanshan
31 August 2018 Palembang, Indonesia  Japan 0–1 2018 Asian Games
4 October 2018 Chongqing, China  Portugal 0–0 2018 Yongchuan International Tournament
6 October 2018 Chongqing, China  Finland 2–1 2018 Yongchuan International Tournament Yang Lina, Zhang Rui
8 October 2018 Chongqing, China  Thailand 2–0 2018 Yongchuan International Tournament Li Ying, Ren Guixin
1 December 2018 Dededo, Guam  Mongolia 10–0 2019 EAFF E-1 Football Championship 2nd Round Wang Shanshan (4), Li Jiayue, Zhang Rui, Li Ying, Lou Jiahui, Yang Lina, Yao Wei
3 December 2018 Dededo, Guam  Hong Kong 6–0 2019 EAFF E-1 Football Championship 2nd Round Yao Wei, Wang Shanshan, Yang Man, Huang Yini, He Wei, Li Ying
5 December 2018 Dededo, Guam  Chinese Taipei 2–0 2019 EAFF E-1 Football Championship 2nd Round Wang Shanshan, Xiao Yuyi
17 January 2019 Meizhou, China  Nigeria 3–0 2019 Meizhou Four Nations Tournament Zhang Rui, Li Ying (2)
20 January 2019 Meizhou, China  South Korea 1–0 2019 Meizhou Four Nations Tournament Gu Yasha
1 March 2019 Algarve, Portugal  Norway 1–3 2019 Algarve Cup Wang Shanshan
4 March 2019 Algarve, Portugal  Denmark 0–1 2019 Algarve Cup
6 March 2019 Algarve, Portugal  Netherlands 1–1 (2–4 p) 2019 Algarve Cup Yao Wei
4 April 2019 Wuhan, China  Russia 4–1 2019 Wuhan International Tournament Yang Li, Wang Shanshan (2), Song Duan
7 April 2019 Wuhan, China  Cameroon 1–0 2019 Wuhan International Tournament Wang Shanshan
31 May 2019 Creteil, France  France 1–2 Friendly Wang Shanshan
8 June 2019 Rennes, France  Germany 0–1 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
13 June 2019 Paris, France  South Africa 1–0 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Li Ying
17 June 2019 Le Havre, France  Spain 0–0 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
25 June 2019 Montpellier, France  Italy 0–2 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
10 December 2019 Busan, South Korea  South Korea 2019 EAFF E-1 Football Championship Final Round
14 December 2019 Busan, South Korea  Japan 2019 EAFF E-1 Football Championship Final Round
17 December 2019 Busan, South Korea  North Korea 2019 EAFF E-1 Football Championship Final Round

Competitive record

All-time results

As of 7 April 2019; counted for the FIFA A-level matches only.
Nations First Played P W D L GF GA GD Confederation
 Argentina 2007 5 3 1 1 9 1 +8 CONMEBOL
 Australia 1988 43 19 11 13 71 50 +21 AFC
 Brazil 1986 11 1 5 5 9 22 −13 CONMEBOL
 Cameroon 2015 2 2 0 0 2 0 +2 CAF
 Canada 1987 28 14 5 9 50 28 +22 CONCACAF
 Chile 2009 2 1 0 1 2 1 +1 CONMEBOL
 Chinese Taipei 1989 16 16 0 0 48 0 +48 AFC
 Colombia 2018 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 CONMEBOL
 Costa Rica 2016 2 1 1 0 3 2 +1 CONCACAF
 Croatia 2017 2 2 0 0 4 1 +3 UEFA
 Czech Republic 2004 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 UEFA
 Denmark 1991 17 10 4 4 32 14 +18 UEFA
 England 2005 5 3 1 1 6 3 +3 UEFA
 Finland 1989 16 13 2 1 43 8 +35 UEFA
 France 1990 10 4 3 3 11 10 +1 UEFA
 Germany 1991 30 8 6 16 30 55 −25 UEFA
 Ghana 1999 4 4 0 0 12 2 +10 CAF
 Guam 1999 2 2 0 0 24 0 +24 AFC
 Guatemala 2000 1 1 0 0 14 0 +14 CONCACAF
 Hong Kong 1989 10 10 0 0 80 0 +80 AFC
 Hungary 2007 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4 UEFA
 Iceland 2007 8 2 1 5 8 13 −5 UEFA
 India 1998 2 2 0 0 28 0 +28 AFC
 Indonesia 1986 1 1 0 0 9 0 +9 AFC
 Italy 1986 7 2 2 3 6 8 −2 UEFA
 Ivory Coast 1988 1 1 0 0 8 1 +7 CAF
 Japan 1986 37 16 6 15 51 34 +17 AFC
 Jordan 2006 4 4 0 0 35 2 +33 AFC
 Kazakhstan 1995 2 2 0 0 16 0 +16 UEFA
 North Korea 1989 36 11 8 17 36 38 −2 AFC
 South Korea 1990 40 29 5 6 102 26 +76 AFC
 Malaysia 1986 2 2 0 0 17 0 +17 AFC
 Mexico 2000 11 8 3 0 17 4 +13 CONCACAF
 Mongolia 2018 1 1 0 0 10 0 +10 AFC
 Myanmar 2004 3 3 0 0 16 0 +16 AFC
 Netherlands 1988 12 6 5 2 16 11 +5 UEFA
 New Zealand 1991 17 13 1 3 42 12 +30 OFC
 Nigeria 2000 6 4 1 1 14 7 +7 CAF
 Norway 1987 27 9 3 16 30 40 −10 UEFA
 Philippines 1995 4 4 0 0 50 0 +50 AFC
 Portugal 1996 8 4 3 1 18 6 +12 UEFA
 Romania 1991 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 UEFA
 Russia 1991 13 11 2 1 23 8 +15 UEFA
 Scotland 2003 2 2 0 0 4 0 +4 UEFA
 Serbia 1989 1 1 0 0 6 1 +5 UEFA
 South Africa 2003 4 4 0 0 28 0 +28 CAF
 Spain 2015 2 0 0 2 2 5 −3 UEFA
 Sweden 1987 26 7 9 10 24 33 −9 UEFA
  Switzerland 2009 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 UEFA
 Tajikistan 2018 1 1 0 0 16 0 +16 AFC
 Thailand 1989 16 15 1 0 67 7 +60 AFC
 United States 1986 58 9 13 36 37 99 −62 CONCACAF
 Ukraine 2017 1 1 0 0 5 0 +5 UEFA
 Uzbekistan 1997 4 4 0 0 34 1 +33 AFC
 Vietnam 2002 13 13 0 0 50 2 +48 AFC
 Wales 2011 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 UEFA
 Zimbabwe 2016 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 CAF
Total 1986 582 311 101 170 1285 551 +734 All

References

  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  2. ^ Joshua Frank (1 March 1986). "Missing from the World Cup? China". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 31 October 2012.
  3. ^ JERE LONGMANPublished: 10 July 1999 (10 July 1999). "SOCCER: WOMEN'S WORLD CUP; Soccer's Move: Grass Roots to Grand Stage – New York Times". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 31 October 2012.
  4. ^ GEORGE VECSEYPublished: 2 August 1996 (2 August 1996). "Women's Soccer: 76,481 Fans, 1 U.S. Gold – New York Times". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 1 November 2012.

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
1983 Thailand 
AFC Women's Champions
1986 (First title)
1989 (Second title)
1991 (Third title)
1993 (Fourth title)
1995 (Fifth title)
1997 (Sixth title)
1999 (Seventh title)
Succeeded by
2001 North Korea 
Preceded by
2003 North Korea 
AFC Women's Champions
2006 (Eighth title)
Succeeded by
2008 North Korea 
1999 FIFA Women's World Cup Final

The final of the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup was an association football match that took place on 10 July 1999, to determine the winner of the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup. The host United States and China played to a scoreless draw following double golden goal extra time. After that, the United States won the title 5–4 with a penalties victory.The match represented one of the most important events in the history of American athletics. It was played before over 90,000 fans in what remains the largest crowd ever to watch a women's sporting event. The well-known image of Brandi Chastain celebrating the winning spot kick that was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated became one of the defining images of women's athletics in the United States.

Bruno Bini

Bruno Bini (born 1 October 1954) is a former French footballer and who managed of the French women's national team.

Under his charge, his team finished in fourth position in both the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup and 2012 Summer Olympics.

In 2015, he became Chinese women's national team coach.

China at the FIFA Women's World Cup

The China women's national football team has represented China at the FIFA Women's World Cup on seven occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They were runners-up once.

China women's national football team results and fixtures

This article lists the results and fixtures for the China women's national football team.

China women's national under-17 football team

The China women's national under-17 football team represents the People's Republic of China in international football competitions in the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup and the AFC U-16 Women's Championship, as well as any other under-17 women's international football tournaments. It is governed by the Chinese Football Association.

China women's national under-20 football team

The China women's national under-20 football team represents the People's Republic of China in international football competitions in the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup and the AFC U-19 Women's Championship, as well as any other under-20 women's international football tournaments. It is governed by the Chinese Football Association.

Hao Wei

Hao Wei (Chinese: 郝伟; pinyin: Hǎo Wěi; Mandarin pronunciation: [xàu wèi]; born December 27, 1976) is a Chinese soccer coach and former international footballer. He is the assistant coach of the Chinese Super League side Shandong Luneng.

Jia Xiuquan

Jia Xiuquan (simplified Chinese: 贾秀全; traditional Chinese: 賈秀全; pinyin: Jiǎ Xiùquán; born 23 March 1963 in Dalian, Liaoning) is a Chinese football Manager and former international player.

Li Jiayue

Li Jiayue (Chinese: 李佳悦; pinyin: Lǐ Jiāyuè; born 8 June 1990) is a Chinese football defender who plays on the China women's national football team.

Marika Domanski-Lyfors

Marika Susan Domanski-Lyfors (born 17 May 1960), née Marika Susan Domanski, is a Swedish football coach and former player. She was head coach of the Sweden women's national football team from September 1996 until June 2005 and also coached the China women's national football team during 2007. She is nicknamed Mackan.

As a Jitex BK player Domanski-Lyfors won two League Championships (1981 and 1984) and three Swedish Cups (1981, 1982 and 1984). All of Jitex's regular players except left-back Domanski-Lyfors were capped at international level, because national team coach Ulf Lyfors did not rate her as a player. Marika disputed Ulf's judgement, but forgave him to the extent that the two were later married and had son Joakim.Her own nine-year spell in charge of the senior Sweden women's national football team was considered a success. The team were runners-up in UEFA Women's Euro 2001 and the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, beaten by Germany in the final of both competitions.After returning to a role with the Sweden women's national under-21 team, Domanski-Lyfors accepted an offer to become head coach of the China women's national football team in March 2007. She oversaw an improvement in the team's results and guided the hosts to the quarter finals of the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup.At the tournament, the Chinese hosts engaged in surveillance and intimidation of first round opponents Denmark. Domanski-Lyfors and her assistant Pia Sundhage were unaware of the incidents and Danish coach Kenneth Heiner-Møller absolved them of any blame, although he refused to shake hands after the match.The Chinese wanted Domanski-Lyfors to stay on for the 2008 Olympics, but she decided against extending her contract. In November 2007 she was appointed a technical director of the Swedish Football Association (SvFF).Marika Domanski-Lyfors can be seen in the 2013 Sveriges Television documentary television series The Other Sport.

During her first international game as Swedish head coach, Sweden won against Italy, 1–0, in Torino on 9 October 1996.

Pan Lina

Pan Lina (born (1977-07-18)18 July 1977) is a Chinese former football midfielder who played the China women's national football team. She participated at the 2000 Summer Olympics, but did not play. She participated at the 2003 Women's World Cup, and 2007 Women's World Cup.

Park Tae-ha

Park Tae-ha (also known as Pu Taixia, born 29 May 1968) is a South Korean association football coach and former player; he was formerly an assistant coach of the South Korean national team.

He played as winger and spent at his entire career with the Pohang Steelers. He managed Yanbian Fude from 2015 to 2018 before being hired to manage the Yellow/B team for China women's national football team.

Pei Encai

Pei Encai (Chinese: 裴恩才; pinyin: Péi ēncái; born 1 December 1953) is a Chinese football manager and a former player.

Sigurður Ragnar Eyjólfsson

Sigurður "Siggi" Ragnar Eyjólfsson (born 1 December 1973) is an Icelandic football manager and former player. He was a professional forward in England and Belgium. From 2007 until 2013 he served as the head coach of Iceland women's national team, guiding them to the 2009 and 2013 editions of the UEFA Women's Championship.

Sigurður secured his place in Walsall history by scoring the third goal in the team's 3–1 win over Oldham Athletic in 1999, to secure promotion to the second tier of English football.

In August 2013 Sigurður resigned as coach of Iceland's women's team after seven years. He continued in his role as head of education at the Football Association of Iceland (KSÍ) and was looking to move into coaching men's football.In January 2017, Sigurður joined Chinese side Jiangsu Suning women's team. He was then appointed by Chinese Football Association as the coach of China women's national football team in November.

Wang Shanshan

Wang Shanshan (Chinese: 王珊珊; pinyin: Wáng Shānshān; born 27 January 1990) is a Chinese football defender who plays on the China women's national football team.

Xu Meishuang

Xu Meishuang (born 28 May 1986) is a Chinese women's international footballer who plays as a goalkeeper. She is a member of the China women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup. On club level she plays for Changchun Yatai in China.

Zhang Haitao

Zhang Haitao (simplified Chinese: 张海涛; traditional Chinese: 張海濤; pinyin: Zhāng Hǎitāo; born April 11, 1970 in Jinan, Shandong, China) is a Chinese football coach and a former player. He spent his whole career with the Shandong Team before he retired and moved into youth management with the Shandong Luneng youth team. He then moved into senior management with the Chinese women's football team before returning to Shandong, where he is the assistant manager.

Zhang Rui (footballer)

Zhang Rui (simplified Chinese: 张睿; traditional Chinese: 張睿; pinyin: Zhāng Ruì; born 17 January 1989) is a Chinese footballer who plays as a midfielder for the China women's national football team and the football team of the People's Liberation Army.

Élisabeth Loisel

Élisabeth Loisel is a French former football player and manager. Throughout her career she played for Stade de Reims and VGA Saint-Maur. She was a member of the French national team between 1980 and her retirement in 1989 at 26.In 1997 she was appointed the French national team's new manager. Under her tenancy France qualified for the 2003 World Cup and the 2001 and 2005 European Championships. She was sacked after France failed to qualify for the 2007 World Cup. That same year she was signed by the Chinese Football Association as China's manager for the 2008 Summer Olympics. However, she was sacked five months from the tournament, following a disappointing performance in the 2008 Algarve Cup.She currently leads the Committee for Women's Football and the FIFA Women's World Cup in the French Football Federation.

China squads – FIFA Women's World Cup
China women's football squads – Summer Olympics
China at the FIFA Women's World Cup
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League system
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Former
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