Chilton Chine

Chilton Chine is a geological feature on the south west coast of the Isle of Wight, England. It lies to the west of the village of Brighstone. It is a small coastal gully, one of a number of such chines on the island created by stream erosion of soft Cretaceous rocks.

It runs from the hamlet of Chilton Green down to the A3055 Military Road where it passes under the road and continues for about 200m to the beach at Brighstone Bay. The sides of the gully are fairly shallow and allow the growth of hardy bushes, scrub and rough grasses.

The Chine drains water off the mainly flat agricultural land that surrounds Chilton Green.

To the east of Chilton Chine is the Isle of Wight Pearl Centre, a tourist attraction which overlooks the chine.

The Isle of Wight Coastal Path follows the top of the chine from the cliff edge to the carpark next to the A3055.

Chilton Chine is located in Isle of Wight
Chilton Chine
Chilton Chine
Chilton Chine on the Isle of Wight
Chilton Chine
Chilton Chine

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Brook Chine

Brook Chine is a geological feature on the south west coast of the Isle of Wight, England. It lies just to the west of the village of Brook. The hamlet of Brookgreen runs along its southern edge.

It is a small coastal gully, one of a number of such chines on the island created by stream erosion of soft Cretaceous rocks. It runs from the A3055 Military Road about 300m due West to the beach at Brook Bay just south of Hanover Point. The sides of the gully are fairly shallow and allow the growth of hardy bushes, scrub and rough grasses.

The Chine drains water from fairly flat agricultural land that extends from Mottistone Down in the north to the coast in the south and almost to the next chine, Chilton Chine to the east.

The Isle of Wight Coastal Path crosses the chine via the road bridge on the A3055 bridge.

Calamosaurus

Calamosaurus (meaning "reed lizard") was a genus of small theropod dinosaur from the Barremian-age Lower Cretaceous Wessex Formation of the Isle of Wight, England. It is based on two cervical vertebrae (BMNH R901), collected by Reverend William Fox.

Chine

A chine ( ) is a steep-sided coastal gorge where a river flows to the sea through, typically, soft eroding cliffs of sandstone or clays. The word is still in use in central Southern England—notably in East Devon, Dorset, Hampshire and the Isle of Wight—to describe such topographical features. The term 'bunny' is sometimes used to describe a chine in Hampshire. The term chine is also used in some Vancouver suburbs in Canada to describe similar features.

Grange Chine and Marsh Chine

Grange Chine and Marsh Chine form a geological feature on the south west coast of the Isle of Wight, England. They lie to the south of the village of Brighstone.

These two chines form the largest chine feature on the Isle of Wight. Grange Chine starts at the southern edge of Brighstone and runs south-west, crosses under the A3055 Military Road at the hamlet of Marsh Green then continues for about 500m to reach the beach at Brighstone Bay. Marsh Chine starts to the east of Marsh Green alongside the A3055 and runs west where it joins the larger Grange Chine before it reaches the beach.

Both chines have much shallower sides than other chines on the Isle of Wight and are extensively covered with hardy bushes, stunted trees and scrub.

The Chines drain water from the southern slopes of Brighstone Down and from as far as Shorwell to the east. The stream ( the Buddle Brook) formed is significant enough to power two mills, Yafford Mill and Brighstone Mill, and where it finally drains into the sea the stream is at least 4m wide and is crossed by a small wooden footbridge. Once the stream reaches the pebble beach it soaks in and disappears.

To the west of Grange Chine is a holiday park consisting of a campsite and a small number of static caravans. The beach here is often covered in litter.

The Isle of Wight Coastal Path crosses Grange Chine via a wooden footbridge near the beach.

Wessex Formation

The Wessex Formation is a fossil-rich English geological formation that dates from the Berriasian to Barremian stages (about 145–125 million years ago) of the Early Cretaceous. It forms part of the Wealden Group and underlies the younger Vectis Formation and overlies the Durlston Formation. The dominant lithology of this unit is mudstone with some interbedded sandstones.

Around the Chines of the Isle of Wight

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