Chicago Hope

Chicago Hope is an American medical drama television series, created by David E. Kelley.[1] It ran on CBS from September 18, 1994 to May 4, 2000. The series is set in a fictional private charity hospital in Chicago, Illinois.[2]

Chicago Hope
Chicago Hope
Chicago Hope cast photo
GenreMedical Drama
Serial drama
Created byDavid E. Kelley
Written byDavid E. Kelley
David Amann
and more...
StarringMandy Patinkin
Héctor Elizondo
Vondie Curtis-Hall
Barbara Hershey
Christine Lahti
Peter Berg
Mark Harmon
Thomas Gibson
Rocky Carroll
Adam Arkin
Lauren Holly
Jayne Brook
E. G. Marshall
Opening theme"Theme from Chicago Hope" by Mark Isham
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons6
No. of episodes141 (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)Henry Bromell
Bill D'Elia
David E. Kelley
John Tinker
Production location(s)Los Angeles
Chicago, IL
CinematographyJames R. Bagdonas
Running timeapprox. 42–44 minutes
Production company(s)David E. Kelley Productions
20th Television
(1994–1995)
(season 1)
20th Century Fox Television
(1995–2000)
(seasons 1-6)
Distributor20th Television
Release
Original networkCBS
TVGN (reruns)
Picture format480i (SDTV)
Original releaseSeptember 18, 1994 –
May 4, 2000
Chronology
Related showsPicket Fences

Premise

The show starred Mandy Patinkin as Dr. Jeffrey Geiger, a hot-shot surgeon with emotional issues stemming from the psychiatric condition of his wife (played by Kim Greist), who drowned their infant son. Adam Arkin plays Dr. Aaron Shutt, a world-renowned neurosurgeon and Dr. Geiger's best friend. Thomas Gibson played Dr. Daniel Nyland, a promiscuous ER doctor and trauma surgeon who was later suspended due to his having an affair with a patient's family member and later was injured in a car crash. Dr. Keith Wilkes played by Rocky Carroll, often clashed with Nyland and was known for his back-to-basics and rough demeanor. He was good friends with Peter Berg's character, Dr. Billy Kronk. Kronk was known for his cowboyish demeanor and known to be very cocky, as showed in an episode where he cuts off a man's injured leg with a chainsaw in a scene where Kronk helps out at an accident site. Peter MacNicol, Héctor Elizondo and Alan Rosenberg feature as the hospital's in-house attorney and chief of staff, respectively. Christine Lahti joined in the second season as a talented cardiac surgeon with a chip on her shoulder, vying with Geiger for the chief of surgery position. She was known fighting in a custody battle with her malicious ex-husband and businessman, Tommy Wilmette, played by Ron Silver. Mr. Wilmette did everything he could to get Austin to lose custody of their daughter. He purchased the hospital at the end of Season 2. Dr. Austin is suspended because she and her daughter go AWOL on a trip to New Zealand. Mr. Wilmette was upset because it took him three months to find his ex-wife and daughter. In Season 3, the doctors want Mr. Wilmette to sell the hospital and the doctors would run it. The doctors viewed that Wilmette didn't know how to run a hospital and cut too many costs that involved patient care. Mr. Wilmette later met with Senator Kennedy at the White House to talk about Healthcare Reform. In Season 2, Geiger resigns from Chicago Hope after trying to save Alan Birch from a deadly gunshot wound to his heart.

Geiger adopted Birch's baby daughter. Geiger later rejoins the doctors at the end of Season 5 when he becomes Chairman of the Board and fires half of the doctors. In Season 4, Dr. Shutt became a psychiatrist and temporarily lost his ability to operate after suffering from a brain aneurysm. In Season 6, Shutt returns to Neurosurgery and works alongside Carla Gugino's character, Dr. Gina Simon.[3]

Cast

Name Portrayed by Occupation Season
1 2 3 4 5 6
Aaron Shutt Adam Arkin Neurosurgeon Main
Phillip Watters Hector Elizondo Hospital Chief of Staff Main
Jeffrey Geiger Mandy Patinkin Surgeon Main Recurring Main
Billy Kronk Peter Berg[4] E.R. Doctor Guest Main
Dennis Hancock Vondie Curtis-Hall Clinic Physician Guest Main
Diane Grad Jayne Brook Internal Med/Research Scientist Guest Main
Danny Nyland Thomas Gibson E.R. Doctor Main
Camille Schutt Roxanne Hart Nurse Main
Alan Birch Peter MacNicol Hospital Attorney Main
Arthur Thurmond E.G. Marshall Main
Angela Giandamenicio Roma Maffia Main
Kate Austin Christine Lahti Cardiac surgeon Main
John Sutton Jamey Sheridan OB/GYN Main
Keith Wilkes Rocky Carroll E.R. Doctor Main
Jack McNeil Mark Harmon Orthopedic Surgeon Main
Lisa Catera Stacy Edwards Neurosurgeon Main
Robert Yeats Eric Stoltz Main
Gina Simon Carla Gugino Neurosurgeon Main
Francesca Alberghetti Barbara Hershey Cardiac Surgeon Main
Jeremy Hanlon Lauren Holly Plastic Surgeon Main
Stuart Brickman Alan Rosenberg Hospital Attorney Main

Production

With the exception of some infrequent on-location scenes, the vast majority of Chicago Hope was filmed on sound stages at the studios of Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, located in the Century City area of Los Angeles.

Episodes

Chicago Hope ran six seasons, airing a total of 141 episodes.

SeasonEpisodesOriginally aired
First airedLast aired
122September 18, 1994May 22, 1995
223September 18, 1995May 20, 1996
326September 16, 1996May 19, 1997
424October 1, 1997May 13, 1998
524September 30, 1998May 19, 1999
622September 23, 1999May 4, 2000

Crossovers

Fyvush Finkel and Kathy Baker appeared as their Picket Fences characters in the first season. Likewise, Mandy Patinkin and Hector Elizondo brought their Chicago Hope characters to Picket Fences that year. Both Adam Arkin and Lauren Holly had previously appeared on Picket Fences as a lawyer and as a deputy sheriff, respectively.

Mandy Patinkin appears in an uncredited role as Geiger in a 1995 episode of NBC's Homicide: Life on the Street. Chicago Hope producer John Tinker shot this footage as a favor to his St. Elsewhere colleague Tom Fontana.

Chicago Hope characters crossed over to Early Edition early in that show's run. Rocky Carroll, Jayne Brook, and Héctor Elizondo all guest-starred in scenes taking place in the hospital.

Reception

The pilot episode of Chicago Hope was broadcast the day before NBC's ER in a special Sunday, 8 p.m. time slot. After the first week, however, the two Chicago-based hospital dramas went "head to head" in their primetime 10 p.m. Thursday night slot. ER was the victor: its first season proved a ratings winner. Despite receiving critical acclaim, Chicago Hope was shifted to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and ultimately to Monday nights in 1995 in a bid for higher ratings, while ER remained in its time slot.

Chicago Hope remained in the Monday slot and performed well, with ratings peaking at 11.9, with a 20 share. In the second season, however, Kelley and Patinkin decided to leave the show. The show was moved to Wednesdays at 10 p.m. in 1997 to make room for the Steven Bochco drama, Brooklyn South, on Mondays. In 1999, both Kelley and Patinkin returned, with a revamped cast now including Barbara Hershey and Lauren Holly, but excluding Lahti, Peter Berg, Jayne Brook, Vondie Curtis-Hall, and Stacy Edwards. CBS also moved the show back to Thursday nights, against NBC's Frasier and ABC's Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. The show was canceled in May 2000.

In 2007, former co-stars Rocky Carroll (Dr. Keith Wilkes); Mark Harmon (Dr. Jack McNeil) and Lauren Holly (Dr. Jeremy Hanlon) worked together on the series NCIS. Holly left the show after three seasons, while Harmon and Carroll remain with the cast today. In addition, Carroll has a recurring role as his NCIS character, Director Leon Vance, on that series's spin off, NCIS: Los Angeles. Jayne Brook (Dr. Diane Grad) and Stacy Edwards have also guest starred on NCIS as well.

Thomas Gibson would later star alongside Patinkin in the highly successful Criminal Minds, as well as Shemar Moore who was a guest star on Chicago Hope during Season 4. Patinkin later left the show early in its third season.

Nielsen ratings

Seasonal rankings (based on average total viewers per episode) of Chicago Hope.

Note: Each U.S. network television season starts in late September and ends in late May, which coincides with the completion of May sweeps.

Season Timeslot[nb 1] Season premiere Season finale TV season Ranking Viewers
(in millions of households)
1st Thursday, 10:00 p.m. September 18, 1994 May 22, 1995 1994–1995 29 11.2[5]
2nd Monday 10:00 p.m. September 18, 1995 May 20, 1996 1995–1996 24 11.4[6]
3rd Monday 10:00 p.m. September 16, 1996 May 19, 1997 1996–1997 30 10.2[7]
4th Wednesday 10:00 p.m. October 1, 1997 May 13, 1998 1997–1998 39 8.9
5th Wednesday 10:00 p.m. September 30, 1998 May 19, 1999 1998–1999 73 9.9
6th Thursday 9:00 p.m. September 23, 1999 May 4, 2000 1999–2000 62 9.4

Home media

Revelation Films has released all 6 seasons of Chicago Hope on DVD in Region 2 (UK) for the very first time.[8][9][10][11][12][13]

DVD Name Ep# Release dates
Region 1 Region 2 Region 4
Season One 22 N/A March 5, 2012 N/A
Season Two 23 N/A July 23, 2012 N/A
Season Three 26 N/A November 5, 2012 N/A
Season Four 24 N/A March 18, 2013 N/A
Season Five 24 N/A September 16, 2013 N/A
Season Six 22 N/A July 21, 2014 N/A

Firsts

The series broke a network television taboo by showing a teenager's breast after her character underwent reconstructive surgery. This was generally seen as relevant to the subject matter and went relatively uncriticized.[14]

On November 18, 1998, Chicago Hope became the first regular series episode to be broadcast in HDTV.[15] The episode was entitled "The Other Cheek".

Mark Harmon's character uttered the word "shit" during a trauma, little criticism was made.

Awards and nominations

Over its six seasons, Chicago Hope was nominated for many accolades and won several, including seven Emmy Awards and a Golden Globe.

Emmy awards

Year Award Recipient Result
1995 Outstanding Drama Series Nominated
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Mandy Patinkin Won
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Hector Elizondo Nominated
Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series Lou Antonio for "Life Support" Nominated
Outstanding Cinematography for a Series Tim Suhrstedt for the episode "Over The Rainbow" Won
Outstanding Editing for a Series – Single Camera Production Lori Jane Coleman for "Pilot" Nominated
Randy Roberts for "The Quarantine" Nominated
Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama Series David Kirschner, Robert Appere, and Kenneth R. Burton for "Internal Affairs" Nominated
Outstanding Main Title Theme Music Mark Isham Nominated
1996 Outstanding Drama Series Nominated
Outstanding Casting for a Series Debi Manwiller Won
Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series Christine Lahti Nominated
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Hector Elizondo Nominated
Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series Jeremy Kagan for the episode "Leave Of Absence" Won
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Richard Pryor Nominated
Michael Jeter Nominated
Rip Torn Nominated
Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series Carol Kane Nominated
Outstanding Cinematography for a Series Kenneth Zunder for "Leave of Absence" Nominated
Outstanding Editing for a Series – Single Camera Production Jim Stewart for "Leave of Absence" Nominated
Outstanding Hairstyling for a Series Mary Ann Valdes, Dione Taylor for "Right to Life" Nominated
Outstanding Makeup for a Series Norman T. Leavitt, Coree Lear, Bari Dreiband-Burman, & Thomas R. Burman for "Quiet Riot" Nominated
Outstanding Main Title Theme Music Mark Isham Nominated
Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama Series Russell C. Fager, R. Russell Smith, Greg Orloff for "Quiet Riot" Nominated
1997 Outstanding Drama Series Nominated
Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series Christine Lahti Nominated
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Héctor Elizondo Won
Adam Arkin Nominated
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Alan Arkin Nominated
Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series Isabella Rossellini Nominated
Outstanding Cinematography for a Series – Single Camera Production James R. Bagdonas for "A Time To Kill" Nominated
Outstanding Editing for a Series – Single Camera Production Alec Smight, Mark C. Baldwin, Augie Hess for "Days of the Rope" Nominated
Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated
1998 Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series Christine Lahti Won
Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series Bill D'Elia for "Brain Salad Surgery" Nominated
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Hector Elizondo Nominated
Outstanding Editing for a Series – Single Camera Production Alec Smight for "Brain Salad Surgery" Nominated
Outstanding Cinematography for a Series – Single Camera Production James R. Bagdonas for "Brain Salad Surgery" Nominated
Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama Series Russell C. Fager, R. Russell Smith, and William Freesh for the episode "Brain Salad Surgery" Won
1999 Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series Christine Lahti Nominated
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Mandy Patinkin Nominated
Outstanding Cinematography for a Series – Single Camera Production James R. Bagdonas for "Home Is Where The Heartache Is" Nominated

Golden Globe Awards

Year Award Recipient Result
1995 Best TV-Series – Drama Nominated
Best Actor in a Television Drama Series Mandy Patinkin Nominated
1996 Best TV-Series – Drama Nominated
1997 Best TV-Series – Drama Nominated
Best Actress in a Television Drama Series Christine Lahti Nominated
1998 Best TV-Series – Drama Nominated
Best Actress in a Television Drama Series Christine Lahti Won

Screen Actors Guild Award

Year Award Recipient Result
1995 Outstanding Performance by an Emsemble in a Drama Series Nominated
Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series Mandy Patinkin Nominated
Hector Elizondo Nominated
1996 Outstanding Performance by an Emsemble in a Drama Series Nominated
Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series Christine Lahti Nominated
1997 Outstanding Performance by an Emsemble in a Drama Series Nominated
Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series Christine Lahti Nominated
1998 Outstanding Performance by an Emsemble in a Drama Series Nominated
Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series Christine Lahti Nominated
1999 Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series Christine Lahti Nominated

Other awards

Year Award Category Nominee(s) Work Result
1998 ALMA Awards Outstanding Individual Performance in a Television Series in a Crossover Role Hector Elizondo Nominated
1999 Outstanding Drama Series Nominated
Outstanding Individual Performance in a Television Series in a Crossover Role Hector Elizondo Nominated
2000 Outstanding Actor in a Drama Series Hector Elizondo Won
1998 American Choreography Awards Outstanding Achievement in Television – Episodic Kenny Ortega Won
1995 American Cinema Editors Awards Best Edited One-Hour Series for Television Lori Jane Coleman "Pilot" Won
1996 Alec Smight "Love and Hope" Nominated
Randy Roberts "The Quarantine" Nominated
1997 Randy Roberts "Transplanted Affection" Won
1999 Alec Smight "Gun With The Wind" Nominated
1995 American Society of Cinematographers Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography in Regular Series Tim Suhrstedt Nominated
1996 Kenneth Zunder "Leave of Absence" Nominated
1997 James R. Bagdonas "Time to Kill" Nominated
1998 James R. Bagdonas "Hope Against Hope" Nominated
1995 Casting Society of America Best Casting for TV, Dramatic Episodic Steve Jacobs Nominated
1996 Debi Manwiller Nominated
1997 Debi Manwiller Nominated
1997 Cinema Audio Society Awards Outstanding Achievement in Sound Mixing for a Television Series Greg Orloff, R. Russell Smith, Russell C. Fager "Quiet Riot" Nominated
1998 R. Russell Smith, William Freesh, Russell C. Fager "Brain Salad Surgery" Won
1999 R. Russell Smith, William Freesh, Russell C. Fager "100 and One Damnations" Nominated
1995 Directors Guild of America Award Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Dramatic Series' Michael Pressman "Pilot" Nominated
1997 GLAAD Media Award Outstanding TV Drama Series Won
1999 Outstanding TV Drama Series Won
2001 Outstanding TV Individual Episode (In a Series Without A Regular Gay Character) "Boys Will Be Girls" Nominated
1997 Satellite Awards Best Television Series- Drama Nominated
Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Drama Christine Lahti Won
Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama Hector Elizondo Nominated
1999 YoungStar Award Best Performance by a Young Actress in a Drama TV Series Mae Whitman Nominated

International airings

In the UK, seasons 1 and 2 originally aired on BBC One. More recently, all seasons of the show have been shown on ITV3. Starting on September 3, 2007, it began airing on Zone Romantica in the UK and Ireland. In Australia, the series originally aired on The Seven Network. In Germany the first seasons were shown in the 1990s. In Hungary, the series aired on Viasat3.
In Indonesia, the series originally aired on RCTI, starting from October 1998 ended from July 2002. As of November 2013 it is airing on UK Freeview/Freesat/Sky/Eutelsat 28A/Virgin Media/WightFibre television channel True Entertainment.

Reruns

Reruns of Chicago Hope aired on TVGN from 2010 to 2012. OWN (as the now-defunct Discovery Health Channel) had aired reruns of Chicago Hope in a semi-regular basis.

Notes

  1. ^ Times listed are Eastern time

References

  1. ^ Pamela Warrick (1995-04-03). "Some say the exciting plots of 'Chicago Hope' lack medical accuracy. But the drama's creator says caution is exercised-and that people know too much to be fooled. : False Hope?". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2012-06-18.
  2. ^ Howard Rosenberg (1994-09-17). "TV Reviews : 'Chicago Hope' a Medical Melodrama". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2012-06-18.
  3. ^ Howard Rosenberg (1994-10-13). "'ER' vs. 'Hope': Which Medicine Is Easier to Swallow?s". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2012-06-18.
  4. ^ Tom White (1995-04-08). "Peter Berg: A Man of Action and Words : Television: His dual life as actor and screenwriter has put him in a state of enjoyable overload. He is on 'Chicago Hope' and has a production deal for his screenplay". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2012-06-18.
  5. ^ "TV Ratings > 1900s". ClassicTVHits.com. Archived from the original on 2009-10-26. Retrieved 2012-06-18.
  6. ^ "TV Ratings > 1900s". ClassicTVHits.com. Archived from the original on 2009-11-09. Retrieved 2012-06-18.
  7. ^ "TV Ratings > 1900s". ClassicTVHits.com. Archived from the original on 2010-01-06. Retrieved 2012-06-18.
  8. ^ "Chicago Hope- Season 1". Amazon.co.uk. Retrieved 2012-06-18.
  9. ^ "Chicago Hope- Season 2". Amazon.co.uk. Retrieved 2012-06-18.
  10. ^ "Chicago Hope- Season 3". Amazon.co.uk. Retrieved 2012-06-18.
  11. ^ "Chicago Hope- Season 4". Amazon.co.uk. Retrieved 2012-06-18.
  12. ^ "Chicago Hope- Season 5". Amazon.co.uk. Retrieved 2012-06-18.
  13. ^ "Chicago Hope- Season 6". Amazon.co.uk. Retrieved 2012-06-18.
  14. ^ Michael Blowen (1995-03-12). "Television censors use situational standards". Baltimore Sun. Boston Globe. Retrieved 2014-07-02.
  15. ^ CEA: Digital America – HDTV Archived 2006-10-11 at the Wayback Machine

External links

1994–95 United States network television schedule

The 1994–95 network television schedule for the six major English-language commercial broadcast networks in the United States covers prime time hours from September 1994 to August 1995. All times are Eastern and Pacific, with certain exceptions, such as Monday Night Football. This was the first season to feature the United Paramount Network and The WB Television Network, as both launched in January 1995. Both networks would ultimately shutdown and form The CW in September 2006.

New series highlighted in bold.

Each of the 30 highest-rated shows is listed with its rank and rating in parenthesis (#rank / rating), as determined by Nielsen Media Research.

Yellow indicates the programs in the top 10 for the season.

Cyan indicates the programs in the top 20 for the season.

Magenta indicates the programs in the top 30 for the season.PBS is not included; member stations have local flexibility over most of their schedules and broadcast times for network shows may vary.

48th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 48th Primetime Emmy Awards were held at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium in Pasadena, California. The awards were presented over two ceremonies, one untelevised on September 7, 1996, and other televised on September 8, 1996. It was hosted by Michael J. Fox, Paul Reiser, and Oprah Winfrey. Two networks, A&E and AMC, received their first major nominations this year.

Frasier took home Outstanding Comedy Series for the third straight year, and won two major awards overall. In the drama field, ER came into the ceremony as the most nominated drama for the second straight year with eleven major nominations, it defeated defending champion NYPD Blue to win Outstanding Drama Series. This turned out to be the only major award ER won. No show won more than two major awards.

The HBO comedy The Larry Sanders Show made Emmy history when it became the first show outside the Big Three television networks to receive the most major nominations (12). Furthermore, Rip Torn won the Supporting Comedy actor award, the first for HBO.

Another first came with Amanda Plummer for Showtime's The Outer Limits. Not only was it the first time a cable network won in her category (Guest Actress, Drama) but was Showtime's first ever Acting Emmy win.

For the twelfth and final season of Murder, She Wrote, Angela Lansbury was once again nominated for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series, she had been nominated for every season of the show, but she was defeated once again. In the process she set records for being the most nominated actress in the category (18), as well as the most nominated actress without winning. Both of these records still stand.

49th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 49th Primetime Emmy Awards were held at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium in Pasadena, California in 1997. They were presented in two ceremonies hosted by Bryant Gumbel, one on Saturday, September 13 and another on Sunday, September 14. The September 14th ceremony was televised on CBS.

Frasier became the first series to win Outstanding Comedy Series four consecutive years, it joined Hill Street Blues which won Outstanding Drama Series four straight years a decade earlier. For the first time since 1979, James Burrows did not receive a Directing nomination, ending his run at 17 consecutive years. Beginning the following year, Burrows would begin a new streak that lasted another six years. In the drama field perennial nominee Law & Order won for its seventh season, the only time a show has won for this specific season. In winning Law & Order became the first drama series that did not have serialized story arcs since Hill Street Blues perfected the formula. Law & Order remains the only non-serialized winner since 1981.

Ratings champion ER also made Emmy history on the night, but not in the way it had hoped. ER came into the ceremony with 17 major nominations, the most on the night and, at that point, second most ever for a comedy or drama series. However, the series did not hear its name called, going 0/17 in major categories, smashing the record for largest shutout in major categories set by Northern Exposure in 1993, which went 0/11. ER won three Creative Arts awards to bring its total output to 3/21, this meant that Northern Exposure still held the title for worst total shutout with an 0/16 tally.

For the first time, not only did the Fox Network win the Lead Actress, Drama award, with Gillian Anderson, for The X-Files, but hers was also the network's first win in any of the Major Acting categories. (Laurence Fishburne and Peter Boyle won for Fox in only guest performances. The latter of which was for The X-Files just the year before.)

This ceremony marked the end of a 20-year residency for the Primetime Emmy Awards at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium dating back to the 29th Primetime Emmy Awards in 1977 ceremony.

Adam Arkin

Adam Arkin (born August 19, 1956) is an American television, film and stage actor, and director. He played the role of Aaron Shutt on Chicago Hope. He has been nominated for numerous awards, including a Tony (Best Actor, 1991, I Hate Hamlet) as well as three primetime Emmys, four SAG Awards (Ensemble, Chicago Hope), and a DGA Award (My Louisiana Sky). In 2002, Arkin won a Daytime Emmy for Outstanding Directing in a Children's Special for My Louisiana Sky. He is also one of the three actors to portray Dale "The Whale" Biederbeck on Monk. Between 2007 and 2009, he starred in the NBC drama Life. Beginning in 1990 he had guest role on Northern Exposure playing the angry paranoid Adam, for which he received an Emmy nomination. In 2009, he portrayed villain Ethan Zobelle, a white separatist gang leader, on the FX original series Sons of Anarchy.

Christine Lahti

Christine Ann Lahti (born April 4, 1950) is an American actress and filmmaker. She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for the 1984 film Swing Shift. Her other film roles include ...And Justice for All (1979), Housekeeping (1987), Running on Empty (1988), and Leaving Normal (1992). For her directorial debut with the 1995 short film Lieberman in Love, she won the Academy Award for Best Live Action Short Film.

Lahti made her Broadway debut in 1980 as a replacement in Loose Ends, and went on to star in the Broadway productions of Present Laughter (1982) and The Heidi Chronicles (1989). An eight-time Golden Globe nominee and six-time Emmy Award nominee, she won a Golden Globe for the 1989 TV movie No Place Like Home, and won a Golden Globe and an Emmy in 1998 for her role as Kate Austin in the CBS series Chicago Hope (1995–99). She returned to Broadway in 2009 to star in God of Carnage. She also had a recurring role as Sonya Paxton in the NBC series Law and Order: Special Victims Unit (2009–11), as Doris McGarrett in the CBS series Hawaii Five-0 (2012–16), and Laurel Hitchin in NBC's The Blacklist (2015–17).

David E. Kelley

David Edward Kelley (born April 4, 1956) is an American television writer and producer, known as the creator of Picket Fences, Chicago Hope, The Practice, Ally McBeal, Boston Public, Boston Legal, Harry's Law, Big Little Lies, and Mr. Mercedes, as well as several films. Kelley is one of very few screenwriters to have created shows aired on all four top commercial U.S. television networks (ABC, CBS, Fox, and NBC).

Dawn Prestwich

Dawn Prestwich is an American television writer and producer. She attended The Hockaday School in Dallas, Texas and Stanford University. In 1997, she shared an Emmy nomination with several producers of Chicago Hope in the category "Outstanding Drama Series". In 2003, she and Nicole Yorkin won a Writers Guild of America award for the pilot episode of the episodic drama The Education of Max Bickford.

In 2009 Prestwich and Yorkin joined the crew of new ABC science fiction drama FlashForward as consulting producers and writers. The series was co-created by David S. Goyer and Brannon Braga. The show follows a team of FBI agents investigating a global blackout that gave victims a vision of their future. Prestwich and Yorkin co-wrote the teleplay for the episode "Gimme Some Truth" based on a story by Barbara Nance. They also co-wrote the episodes "Believe" and "Goodbye Yellow Brick Road".She co-created the period drama Z: The Beginning of Everything with Nicole Yorkin in 2015.

Discovery Health Channel

Discovery Health Channel was a U.S. cable television specialty channel. Launched in July 1998, it was owned by Discovery Communications as a spin-off of Discovery Channel, focusing on health and wellness-oriented programming.

In the beginning, DHC's programming consisted of reruns of medical- and health-themed programming from other Discovery networks, particularly TLC. As the network matured, it began producing its own reality series, mostly dealing with babies (Babies: Special Delivery, Birth Day), bodies (Plastic Surgery: Before and After, National Body Challenge), and medicine (The Critical Hour, Dr. G: Medical Examiner). DHC also showed episodes of the CBS medical drama series Chicago Hope on a semi-regular basis. DHC also aired fitness-related programming, most of which later spun off to its sister network FitTV. DHC won its first Daytime Emmy in 2004 for its original series about adoptive families, Adoption Stories.

On January 15, 2008, Discovery announced a joint venture with Oprah Winfrey's Harpo Productions to re-launch Discovery Health as OWN: The Oprah Winfrey Network, in 2009. After multiple delays, OWN officially launched on January 1, 2011, replacing Discovery Health.On February 1, 2011, FitTV was rebranded as Discovery Fit & Health. The network initially took on Discovery Health's programming with FitTV's fitness programming as a compliment. It was relaunched in 2015 as Discovery Life, to reflect a generalization of its scope to include life events and family stories.

Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series – Drama

The Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series – Drama is one of the annual Golden Globe Awards given to the best drama television series. Documentary series and mini-series are also eligible for this award, as shown by the consecutive awards to Rich Man, Poor Man, Roots, and 60 Minutes.

Héctor Elizondo

Héctor Elizondo (born December 22, 1936) is an American actor. Elizondo is best known for his television roles playing Dr. Phillip Watters on Chicago Hope and Ed Alzate on Last Man Standing, and movie roles like Mr. Grey in The Taking of Pelham One Two Three, Detective Sunday in American Gigolo, Barnard Thompson in Pretty Woman, and Jon Flint in Beverly Hills Cop III.

Elizondo's awards and accolades include a Golden Globe Award nomination, an Emmy Award (five nominations), two ALMA Awards (eight nominations), and five Screen Actors Guild Award nominations.

Jayne Brook

Jayne Brook (born Jane Anderson, September 16, 1960) is an American actress, best known for her role as Dr. Diane Grad on the medical drama Chicago Hope, as a series regular for five of the show's six seasons. Since 2017, Brook currently has a recurring role as Starfleet Vice Admiral Katrina Cornwell in the series Star Trek: Discovery.

Mandy Patinkin

Mandel Bruce Patinkin (; born November 30, 1952) is an American actor and singer.Patinkin is well known for his portrayal of Inigo Montoya in the 1987 movie The Princess Bride. His other film credits include Yentl (1983), Alien Nation (1988), Dick Tracy (1990), and Wish I Was Here (2014). He has appeared in major roles in television series such as Chicago Hope, Dead Like Me, and Criminal Minds, and currently plays Saul Berenson in the Showtime series Homeland.

He is a noted interpreter of the musical works of Stephen Sondheim and is known for his work in musical theater, originating iconic roles such as Georges Seurat in Sunday in the Park with George and Ché in the original Broadway production of Evita.

Mark Tinker

Mark Tinker (born January 16, 1951) is an American television producer and director. Tinker was an executive producer and regular director on the HBO series Deadwood. Prior to Deadwood, Tinker served as a director/producer on NYPD Blue, which was co-created by Deadwood writer David Milch. Tinker has also directed episodes of The White Shadow, St. Elsewhere, Capital News, Civil Wars, Chicago Hope, L.A. Law, Grey's Anatomy, Private Practice, Scandal, and Chicago P.D.

Patrick Norris

Patrick R. Norris is an American television director.

His directing credits include Chuck, Friday Night Lights, Gossip Girl, The Vampire Diaries, Hidden Palms, Related, Bones, North Shore, The Division, The O.C., Boston Public, Star Trek: Enterprise, The Twilight Zone, American Dreams, Roswell, V.I.P., Once and Again, Jack & Jill, Xena: Warrior Princess, Wasteland, Cupid, The Net, Dawson's Creek, The Visitor, Relativity, Malibu Shores, Second Noah, The Marshal, My So-Called Life, Chicago Hope and Party of Five.In 1989 and 1991, Norris won two Primetime Emmy Awards for "Outstanding Achievement In Costuming For a Series" for his work on the series Thirtysomething.

Peter Berg

Peter Berg (born March 11, 1964) is an American director, producer, writer, and actor. His directorial film works include the black comedy Very Bad Things (1998), the action comedy The Rundown (2003), the sports drama Friday Night Lights (2004), the action thriller The Kingdom (2007), the superhero comedy-drama Hancock (2008), the military science fiction war film Battleship (2012), the war film Lone Survivor (2013), the disaster drama Deepwater Horizon (2016), the Boston Marathon bombing drama Patriots Day (2016) and the action thriller Mile 22 (2018), the latter four all starring Mark Wahlberg. In addition to cameo appearances in the last six of these titles, he has had prominent acting roles in films including The Great White Hype (1996), Cop Land (1997), Corky Romano (2001), Collateral (2004), Smokin' Aces (2006), and Lions for Lambs (2007).

In television, Berg developed Friday Night Lights (2006–2011), adapted from his film, earning two Primetime Emmy Award nominations. As an actor, he is best known for his role as Dr. Billy Kronk on the CBS medical drama Chicago Hope (1995–1999).

Peter MacNicol

Peter MacNicol (born April 10, 1954) is an American actor. He received a Theatre World Award for his 1981 Broadway debut in the play Crimes of the Heart. His film roles include Galen in Dragonslayer (1981), Stingo in Sophie's Choice (1982), Janosz Poha in Ghostbusters II (1989), camp organizer Gary Granger in Addams Family Values (1993), and David Langley in Bean (1997).

MacNicol won the 2001 Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series for his role as the eccentric lawyer John Cage in the FOX comedy-drama Ally McBeal (1997–2002). He is also known for his television roles as attorney Alan Birch in the medical drama Chicago Hope (1994–98), Tom Lennox in the sixth season of action-thriller 24 (2007), as physicist Dr. Larry Fleinhardt on the CBS crime drama Numbers (2005–10), Dr. Stark on Grey's Anatomy (2010–11), Jeff Kane on the political satire series Veep (2016–17), and Nigel the Advisor on Tangled: The Series.

Rocky Carroll

Roscoe "Rocky" Carroll (born July 8, 1963) is an American actor. He is best known for his roles as Joey Emerson on the FOX comedy-drama Roc (1991–94) as Dr. Keith Wilkes on the CBS medical drama Chicago Hope, and as NCIS Director Leon Vance on the CBS drama NCIS and its spinoffs Los Angeles and New Orleans. He also played a supporting role in the 1995 thriller film Crimson Tide.

Thomas Gibson

Thomas Ellis Gibson (born July 3, 1962) is an American actor and director. He portrayed Daniel Nyland in the CBS series Chicago Hope, Greg Montgomery on the ABC series Dharma & Greg, and Aaron Hotchner on the CBS series Criminal Minds (2005–2016).

Vondie Curtis-Hall

Vondie Curtis-Hall (born September 30, 1950) is an American actor, screenwriter, film director and television director. As an actor, he is known for his role as Dr. Dennis Hancock on the CBS medical drama Chicago Hope created by David E. Kelley and as Ben Urich in the Netflix TV series Marvel's Daredevil. He wrote, directed and starred in the cult film Gridlock'd.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.