Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts

Chestnut Hill is a New England village located six miles (9.7 km) west of downtown Boston, Massachusetts, United States. Like all Massachusetts villages, Chestnut Hill is not an incorporated municipal entity. Unlike most Massachusetts villages, it encompasses parts of three separate municipalities, each located in a different county: the town of Brookline in Norfolk County; the city of Boston in Suffolk County (parts of its neighborhoods of Brighton and West Roxbury), and the city of Newton in Middlesex County. Chestnut Hill's borders are roughly defined by the 02467 ZIP Code. Chestnut Hill is not a topographical designation; the name refers to several small hills that overlook the 135-acre (546,000 m2) Chestnut Hill Reservoir rather than one particular hill. Chestnut Hill is best known as the home of Boston College, part of the Boston Marathon route, as well as the Collegiate Gothic canvas of landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted.[1]

Chestnut Hill
Village
Boston College's Gasson Hall building across the Chestnut Hill Reservoir
Coordinates: 42°19′50″N 71°9′58″W / 42.33056°N 71.16611°WCoordinates: 42°19′50″N 71°9′58″W / 42.33056°N 71.16611°W
CountryUnited States
StateMassachusetts
CountyNorfolk County, Suffolk County, and Middlesex County
ZIP Code
02467

History

While most of Chestnut Hill remained farmland well into the early 20th century, the area around the reservoir was developed, in 1870, by landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, designer of Central Park in New York City and of the Emerald Necklace in Boston and Brookline.

Because of the significance of its landscape and architecture, the National Register of Historic Places, in 1986, designated parts of Chestnut Hill as historic districts. Examples of Colonial, Italianate, Shingle, Tudor Revival, and Victorian architectural styles are evident in the village's country estates and mansions. The Boston College campus is itself an early example of Collegiate Gothic architecture.

Parkland

Hammond Pond Reservation, an extensive forest preserve and protected wetlands, goes through Chestnut Hill and Newton.[2]

The Kennard Park and Conservation Area is a post-agricultural forest grown up on 19th century farmland. The mixed and conifer woodlands reveal colonial stone walls, a red maple swamp with century-old trees, and a sensitive fern marsh.[3]

Shopping centers

Transportation

Chestnut Hill is served by three branches of the Green Line of the MBTA, Boston's light rail system. Stations include:

  • B Line: Chestnut Hill Avenue, South Street, Boston College
  • C Line: Cleveland Circle
  • D Line: Reservoir, Chestnut Hill

The area is also served by various MBTA buses.

Registered historic districts

Education

The village is served by the Public School District of Brookline and the Newton Public Schools. There are also a number of private schools including Mount Alvernia Academy (Catholic, K–6), Brimmer and May School (non-denominational, K–12) and The Chestnut Hill School. Children may opt to attend school in neighboring villages or in Boston.

Chestnut Hill is home to Boston College and Pine Manor College.

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-04-03. Retrieved 2011-01-24.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Hammond Pond Reservation". mass.gov.
  3. ^ "Newton Conservators - Kennard Park". www.newtonconservators.org.
  4. ^ "Seth Klarman". Forbes. Retrieved 2017-02-23.
1941 Boston College Eagles football team

The 1941 Boston College Eagles football team represented Boston College during the 1941 college football season. The Eagles were led by first-year head coach Denny Myers, and played their home games at Alumni Field in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts and Fenway Park in Boston. They finished with a record of 7–3.

1944 Boston College Eagles football team

The 1944 Boston College Eagles football team represented Boston College during the 1944 college football season. The Eagles were led by head coach Moody Sarno, who was in his second year covering for Denny Myers while Myers served in the United States Navy. Boston College played their home games at Alumni Field in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts and Braves Field and Fenway Park in Boston. They finished with a record of 4–3.

1959 Boston College Eagles football team

The 1959 Boston College Eagles football team represented Boston College during the 1959 NCAA University Division football season. The Eagles were led by ninth-year head coach Mike Holovak and played their home games at Alumni Stadium in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. At the conclusion of a 5–4 season, Holovak was fired as head coach. He posted a record of 49–29–3 in his nine seasons at Boston College.

1960 Boston College Eagles football team

The 1960 Boston College Eagles football team represented Boston College during the 1960 NCAA University Division football season. The Eagles were led by first-year head coach Ernie Hefferle and played their home games at Alumni Stadium in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts.

1961 Boston College Eagles football team

The 1961 Boston College Eagles football team represented Boston College during the 1961 NCAA University Division football season. The Eagles were led by second-year head coach Ernie Hefferle and played their home games at Alumni Stadium in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. After posting a losing record for the second consecutive year, Hefferle resigned as head coach to join as an assistant at Pittsburgh.

1963 Boston College Eagles football team

The 1963 Boston College Eagles football team represented Boston College during the 1963 NCAA University Division football season. The Eagles were led by second-year head coach Jim Miller and played their home games at Alumni Stadium in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. Boston College finished with a record of 6–3.

1964 Boston College Eagles football team

The 1964 Boston College Eagles football team represented Boston College during the 1964 NCAA University Division football season. The Eagles were led by third-year head coach Jim Miller and played their home games at Alumni Stadium in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. Boston College finished with a record of 6–3.

1965 Boston College Eagles football team

The 1965 Boston College Eagles football team represented Boston College during the 1965 NCAA University Division football season. The Eagles were led by fourth-year head coach Jim Miller and played their home games at Alumni Stadium in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. Boston College finished with a record of 6–4.

1966 Boston College Eagles football team

The 1966 Boston College Eagles football team represented Boston College during the 1966 NCAA University Division football season. The Eagles were led by fifth-year head coach Jim Miller and played their home games at Alumni Stadium in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. Boston College finished with a record of 4–6.

1967 Boston College Eagles football team

The 1967 Boston College Eagles football team represented Boston College during the 1967 NCAA University Division football season. The Eagles were led by sixth-year head coach Jim Miller and played their home games at Alumni Stadium in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. Boston College finished with a record of 4–6 for the second consecutive year. Head coach Jim Miller resigned at the end of the season, finishing with an overall record of 34–24 in six seasons at Boston College.

1968 Boston College Eagles football team

The 1968 Boston College Eagles football team represented Boston College during the 1968 NCAA University Division football season. The Eagles were led by first-year head coach Joe Yukica and played their home games at Alumni Stadium in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. Boston College finished with a record of 6–3 and were not invited to a bowl game.

1972 Boston College Eagles football team

The 1972 Boston College Eagles football team represented Boston College during the 1972 NCAA University Division football season. The Eagles were led by fifth-year head coach Joe Yukica and played their home games at Alumni Stadium in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. Boston College finished with a record of 4–7.

1973 Wightman Cup

The 1973 Wightman Cup was the 45th edition of the annual women's team tennis competition between the United States and Great Britain. It was held at Longwood Cricket Club in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts in the United States.

Boston College Main Campus Historic District

Boston College Main Campus Historic District encompasses the historic heart of the campus of Boston College in the Chestnut Hill area of Newton, Massachusetts. It consists of a collection of six Gothic Revival stone buildings, centered on Gasson Hall, designed by Charles Donagh Maginnis and begun in 1909.The district has been ambiguously listed in the National Park Service's NRIS database (the official repository for listings on the National Register of Historic Places) as "pending" since January 9, 1990 (1990-01-09).

Chestnut Hill Reservation

Chestnut Hill Reservation is a public recreation area and historic preserve surrounding the Chestnut Hill Reservoir in the Allston-Brighton neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. The reserve is part of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir Historic District, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and is a City of Boston Landmark. It is managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation.

Chestnut Hill Reservoir

Chestnut Hill Reservoir is a reservoir created in 1870 on existing marshes and meadowland to supplement the city of Boston's water needs. It is surrounded by Chestnut Hill, a neighborhood which consists of parts of Boston, Brookline, and Newton. The reservoir, though, is located entirely within the city limits of Boston. A 1.56 mile jogging loop abuts the reservoir. Chestnut Hill Reservoir was taken offline in 1978 as it was no longer needed for regular water supply distribution, but is maintained in emergency backup status. It is recognized today on the National Register of Historic Places and it has designation as a City of Boston Landmark.

On May 1, 2010, the Chestnut Hill Reservoir was temporarily brought back online during a failure of a connecting pipe at the end of the MetroWest Water Supply Tunnel. The Sudbury aqueduct was also activated to feed Chestnut Hill from the Foss and Sudbury reservoirs to keep the supply going. Separately the Spot Pond reservoir, also an emergency source, was tapped during the pipe break incident. Though a boil-water order was issued for fear that the water would not be safe to drink, following heavy treatment with chlorine later tests showed the water to be completely safe for drinking.In mid April 2012, the body of a Boston College student who had been missing for seven weeks was found in the reservoir. Initial autopsy results were consistent with the student having accidentally drowned.

General Cinema Corporation

General Cinema Corporation, also known as General Cinema, GCC, or General Cinema Theatres, was a chain of movie theaters in the United States. At its peak the company operated approximately 621 screens, some of which were among the first cinemas certified by THX. The company operated for approximately 67 years, from 1935 until 2002.

The Shops at Chestnut Hill

The Shops at Chestnut Hill is a two-level enclosed shopping mall, located in the Chestnut Hill section of Newton, Massachusetts on Boylston Street (Route 9). It is managed by Simon Property Group, who owns 94.4% of it, and is anchored by Bloomingdale's in two locations, with the Women's store located at the west end and the Men's Home & Furnishing store anchoring the east end. Free parking

The Street Chestnut Hill

The Street at Chestnut Hill is an open-air shopping center on Route 9 in the Newton portion of Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. The shopping center contains 640,090 sq. feet of fashion retailers, restaurants, and entertainment options. The architecture and design of the new shopping center mimics modern village-like streetscapes and overlooks neighboring Hammond Pond. The center contains a Showcase SuperLux and a Star Market.

Municipalities and communities of Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States
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