Chester Marcol

Czesław Bolesław "Chester" Marcol (born October 24, 1949 in Opole, Poland) is a former professional American football player. A placekicker for the Green Bay Packers from 1972 to 1980, he was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1987.

Chester Marcol
No. 13
Born:October 24, 1949 (age 69)
Opole, Poland
Career information
Position(s)Placekicker
CollegeHillsdale College
NFL draft1972 / Round: 2/ Pick 34
Career history
As player
1972–1980Green Bay Packers
1980Houston Oilers
Career highlights and awards
Pro Bowls1972, 1974
Awards1972 NFC Rookie of the Year
HonorsGreen Bay Packers Hall of Fame
RecordsGreen Bay Packers
Attempts, season- 48 (1972)
Field goals, season- 33 (1972)

Early years

Marcol lived in Poland until the age of 14, when his father committed suicide, forcing Marcol's mother to send their family to the United States. He attended Imlay City High School in Michigan without much knowledge of the English language. In Poland, Marcol had great kicking abilities in soccer. His gym teacher discovered his talent and showed him the game of football. He attended Hillsdale College where he was named NAIA All-American and holds the record for longest field goal.[1]

NFL career

Marcol was selected by Green Bay Packers coach Dan Devine in the second round of the 1972 NFL Draft. He scored 128 points his rookie year, leading the league in scoring, and he was named NFC Rookie of the Year and All-Pro.[1]

He may best be known for his game-winning touchdown against the Chicago Bears on 7 September 1980. On opening day of the 1980 NFL season, the Packers were tied 6-6 with the Bears in overtime. A 32-yard pass from Lynn Dickey to James Lofton helped set up a 34-yard field goal attempt to win the game for the Packers. Marcol's kick was blocked and deflected straight back to him. He caught the ball, ran around left end and was able to make it 25 yards into the end zone to give the Packers a 12-6 victory.[2] He later acknowledged that he was high on cocaine during the game's second half.[3]

Marcol was cut by head coach Bart Starr on 8 October 1980 following a rough game against the Cincinnati Bengals. Starr said Marcol was cut because of poor kickoffs, but Marcol felt it was because of his cocaine use.[4] He signed with the Houston Oilers when they came to Green Bay for a game on 14 December 1980. It was determined very late that week that Oilers kicker Toni Fritsch would be unable to play. Marcol was in Green Bay, so the Oilers claimed him off waivers. He kicked one field goal and made only one of three PATs in a 22-3 Houston win.[5] Marcol remained with the Oilers for the rest of the season, but did not play again due to Fritsch's return.[6]

Post-football years

On 14 February 1986, Marcol attempted suicide by drinking a mixture of battery acid, rat poison, and vodka,[7] which severely damaged his esophagus. He has his esophagus stretched as treatment.[1]

Marcol is a resident of the Upper Peninsula community of Dollar Bay, Michigan. He has a wife and three children.[8] He slowly recovered from his addictions, but still suffers from hepatitis C and a heart condition. He works on weekends as a drug and alcohol abuse counselor near his home.

Marcol published a memoir in September 2011 entitled Alive and Kicking: My Journey Through Football, Addiction and Life. He discusses his childhood, immigration to the United States, playing for the Packers, and his fall from grace.

References

  1. ^ a b c Marcol still kickin' despite struggles Archived August 20, 2006, at the Wayback Machine by Gary D'Amato of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, posted 28 October 2002.
  2. ^ Cameron, Steve (1993). The Packers!. Dallas: Taylor Pub. Co. p. 158. ISBN 978-0-87833-133-8.
  3. ^ Marcol, Chester (2011). Alive and Kicking. p. 94.
  4. ^ Marcol, Chester (2011). Alive and Kicking. p. 97.
  5. ^ Houston Oilers 22 at Green Bay Packers 3
  6. ^ Marcol, Chester (2011). Alive and Kicking. p. 103.
  7. ^ Marcol, Chester (2011). Alive and Kicking. p. 125.
  8. ^ Chester Marcol's claim to fame from weht.net posted 8 May 2001.
1972 Green Bay Packers season

The 1972 Green Bay Packers season was their 54th season overall and their 52nd season in the National Football League. The club posted a 10–4 record under second-year head coach Dan Devine, earning them the NFC Central division title. The Packers returned to the playoffs after a four-year drought; their most recent division title was in 1967, completing that postseason with a decisive win in Super Bowl II in January 1968.

In 1972, Green Bay entered the penultimate regular season game at Minnesota on December 10 with an 8–4 record. The Vikings (7–5) had won the season's earlier game at Lambeau Field in Green Bay by breaking a fourth quarter tie with two interceptions for touchdowns. This time, the Packers overcame a 7–0 halftime deficit at Metropolitan Stadium with 23 unanswered points to clinch the division title. Running back John Brockington became the first in NFL history to rush for 1,000 yards in each of his first two seasons, and did it again the following season.

Placekicker Chester Marcol established an NFL rookie record for field goals in a season (since broken). It was the fifteenth and final season of hall of fame linebacker Ray Nitschke.

The Packers' next division title came 23 years later, in 1995.

1973 Chicago Bears season

The 1973 Chicago Bears season was their 54th regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 3–11 record, the second worst showing in franchise history.

1973 Green Bay Packers season

The 1973 Green Bay Packers season was their 55th season overall and their 53rd season in the National Football League. The defending division champions posted a 5–7–2 record under third-year head coach Dan Devine, earning them a third-place finish in the NFC Central division.

1974 Detroit Lions season

The 1974 Detroit Lions season was the 45th season in franchise history. It was the Lions' final season playing at Tiger Stadium; the team moved to the Pontiac Silverdome the following season and played home games there until the end of their 2001 season. Prior to the start of training camp, tragedy would strike the Lions, as Head Coach Don McCafferty died of a fatal heart attack at age 53. He would later be replaced by Lions assistant Rick Forzano, who would guide the Lions to a 7–7 record in their final season at Tiger Stadium. This would also be the last season until 2011 when Monday Night Football would air in the city of Detroit as a result of the Lions playing in Pontiac from 1975 to 2001, following by sub par seasons while playing home games at Ford Field during its first eight years.

1974 Green Bay Packers season

The 1974 Green Bay Packers season was their 56th season overall and their 54th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–8 record under fourth-year head coach Dan Devine, a consecutive third-place finish in the NFC Central division. The Packers lost their last three games, all to non-playoff teams.

With a year remaining on his five-year contract, Devine resigned a day after the last game of the regular season and returned to college football at Notre Dame, following the sudden retirement of Ara Parseghian. Devine was succeeded as head coach at Green Bay by hall of fame quarterback Bart Starr, hired on Christmas Eve.

1980 Green Bay Packers season

The 1980 Green Bay Packers season was their 62nd season overall and their 60th in the National Football League. The club posted a 5–10–1 record under coach Bart Starr, earning them a fifth-place finish in the NFC Central division.

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List of Hillsdale College alumni

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Will Carleton (1869), poet

Cyrus Cline (1876), member of the United States House of Representatives from Indiana

Solomon Robert Dresser (1865), member of the United States House of Representatives from Pennsylvania; founder and president of S.R. Dresser Manufacturing Co., now Dresser Industries

Spencer O. Fisher (c. 1865), member of the United States House of Representatives from Michigan's 10th congressional district

Clinton B. Fisk (c. 1844), Civil War soldier and statesman; namesake of Fisk University; Prohibition Party candidate for president in 1888; first inductee into the Hillsdale County, Michigan Veteran's Hall of Fame in 2001

Washington Gardner (1870), Civil War soldier and statesman

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Moses A. Luce (1866), lawyer; Medal of Honor recipient for service in the Civil War

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May Gorslin Preston Slosson (BS 1878, MS 1879), educator and suffragist, first woman Philosophy PhD in the U.S.

Bion J. Arnold (1884), expert in mass transportation, called the "Father of the Third Rail"

Jared Maurice Arter (1885), slavery-born African-American pastor and educator

Chester Hardy Aldrich (1888), one-term governor of Nebraska; justice on the Nebraska Supreme Court

Ulysses Grant Baker Pierce (1891), Unitarian minister and Chaplain of the Senate from 1909 to 1913

Leroy Waterman (1898), archaeologist, scholar, and Biblical translator

Henry M. Kimball (c. 1900), member of the United States House of Representatives from Michigan's 3rd congressional district

Lynn Bell (1906), minor-league professional baseball player, college football coach

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Harry Bidwell Ansted (1913), US Army chaplain; first president of the Seoul National University

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Walter R. Nickel (1929), dermatologist, a founder of the field of dermatopathology

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Wayne Schurr (1959), relief pitcher for the Chicago Cubs during the 1964 season

Bob Clark (1963), filmmaker, most famous for directing A Christmas Story and Porky's

Spanky McFarland (1976), college baseball coach at Northern Illinois and James Madison

Howard Mudd (1963), offensive line coach for Philadelphia Eagles

Bud Acton (c. 1964), NBA player with the San Diego Rockets in the 1967-68 season

David L. Cornwell (1964), former member of the United States House of Representatives from Indiana

David Pringle (1965), president of Luminys Systems Corp., chief technology officer of Imagility, Inc., winner of two Academy Awards and one Emmy Award for technical achievement

Bruce McLenna (1966), former halfback for the Detroit Lions and Kansas City Chiefs

Chuck Liebrock (1967), former offensive lineman in the Canadian Football League with the Toronto Argonauts and the Winnipeg Blue Bombers

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Manuel Ayau (1973), Guatemalan-born politician, humanitarian, and founder of the "Universidad Francisco Marroquín"

Ron Tripp (c. 1975), expert in Sambo and Judo and current general secretary of USA Judo

Peter Leithart (1981), reformed theologian

Chris Chocola (1984), former member of the United States House of Representatives from Indiana's 2nd congressional district and board member of the Club for Growth

Beth Walker (1987), Justice of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals

Ruta Sepetys (1989), author of New York Times bestseller Between Shades of Gray

Tom Heckert (1990), former general manager for the Cleveland Browns

Erik Prince (1992), former U.S. Navy Seal, founder and former owner and CEO of private-security firm Blackwater, renamed Xe in 2009

David Viviano (1994), justice on the Michigan Supreme Court

Thomas Morrison (1997), representative for the 54th District in the Illinois General Assembly

Robert P. Murphy (1998), economist and author

Brent Weeks (2000), author of The Night Angel Trilogy and the Lightbringer series

Peter Leeson (2001), economist

Aric Nesbitt (2001), member of Michigan House of Representatives, 66th district

Tyler Blanski (2006), author and musician

Hans Zeiger (2007), author and representative for the 25th Legislative District of Washington

Michael Sessions (2010), former mayor of Hillsdale, Michigan, one of the youngest mayors ever elected in the U.S.

Katherine Timpf (2010), journalist and comedian

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Rich Szaro

Ryszard "Rich" Szaro (March 7, 1948 – April 7, 2015) was a Polish-born professional American football player who played placekicker for six seasons for the Philadelphia Bell of the WFL, New Orleans Saints and New York Jets.Szaro moved with his family at age 14 to the United States in 1962 settling in New York City and studying at St. Francis Preparatory School in Brooklyn, NY. A natural athlete, he ran track and played football, tennis, soccer and volleyball. As a senior. the 5'11" 185lb. running back and kicker broke the New York City single season scoring record with 164 points. Szaro was named a Parade All-American, and later was inducted in the school’s Inaugural Ring of Honor.

After graduating from Harvard University in 1971 with a degree in economics Szaro participated in a track meet in Paris, and he decided to stay in Europe and work as an export manager for Colgate-Palmolive. However, he missed playing football and saw other foreign- born soccer-style kickers making NFL rosters including fellow Pole, Chester Marcol of the Green Bay Packers. He returned to the USA in 1974 to pursue a career in Professional Football.

After his playing career, Szaro returned to international trade with a clothing firm based in New York but traveling extensively throughout South America, Europe, and the Far East. He was very adept at fitting in with other cultures helped by the fact that he spoke six languages, and his English had barely a trace of an accent. Szaro worked as liaison between skilled Jewish professionals emigrating from Russia and American businesses, many emigrants whom he place through Harvard connections.Szaro returned to Poland to live and work in the 1990s. He died in at his home in Warsaw at the age of 67.

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