Cheshire West and Chester Council elections

Cheshire West and Chester is a unitary authority in Cheshire, England. It was created on 1 April 2009 replacing Chester, Ellesmere Port and Neston, Vale Royal and Cheshire County Council.

Political control

Since the first election to the council in 2008 political control of the council has been held by the following parties:[1][2][3]

Executive Leader Term of office Elections won
Conservative Mike Jones 15 May 2008 – 21 May 2015 2008, 2011
Labour Samantha Dixon 21 May 2015 – 3 May 2019 2015
No overall control 3 May 2019 – present 2019

Council elections

By-election results

2011

Ellesmere Port Town by-election, 20 October 2011[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Lynn Clare 686 -
Conservative Graham Pritchard 102
Socialist Labour Kenny Spain 65
UKIP Andrew Roberts 64
Liberal Democrat Hilary Chrusciezl 41
Majority 584
Turnout 15.3
Labour hold Swing

2014

Boughton by-election, 10 July 2014[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Martyn Delaney 614 44.8 -7.3%
Conservative Kate Vaughan 469 34.2 -6.2%
UKIP Charles Dodman 131 9.6 +9.6%
Green John McNamara 86 6.3 +6.3%
Liberal Democrat Mark Gant 70 5.1 -2.4%
Majority 145 10.6
Turnout 1,370
Labour hold Swing
Winnington and Castle by-election, 10 July 2014[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Sam Naylor 525 39.5
Conservative Jim Sinar 418 31.4
UKIP Amos Wright 307 23.1
Liberal Democrat Alice Chapman 80 6.0
Majority 107 8.0
Turnout 1,330
Labour hold Swing

2017

Blacon by-election, 20 April 2017[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Ben Powell 1,556 59.1 0%
Conservative Jack Jackson 574 21.8 +4%
Independent Steve Ingram 434 16.5 +16.5%
Liberal Democrat Lizzie Jewkes 70 2.7 +2.7%
Majority 982 37.3
Turnout 2,634 25.4 -35.8%
Labour hold Swing

2018

Ellesmere Port Town by-election, 3 May 2018[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Edwardson, Mike 1,447
Conservative Griffiths, Robert Douglas 239
Green Roberts, Matthew Joseph 60
Majority
Turnout 24.51
Labour hold Swing

References

  1. ^ "Cheshire West & Chester Council Elections 2019". The Standard. 3 May 2019. Retrieved 4 May 2019.
  2. ^ "Council compositions". The Elections Centre. Retrieved 3 May 2016.
  3. ^ "Cheshire West and Chester". BBC News Online. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  4. ^ "Ellesmere Port Town Ward". www.cheshirewestandchester.gov.uk. Cheshire West and Chester Council. Retrieved 5 May 2017.
  5. ^ "Boughton, 2014". www.englishelections.org.uk. Kristofer Keane. Retrieved 2 May 2017.
  6. ^ "Boughton, 2014". www.englishelections.org.uk. Kristofer Keane. Retrieved 3 May 2017.
  7. ^ "By-election - Blacon Ward". www.cheshirewestandchester.gov.uk. Cheshire West and Chester Council. Retrieved 1 May 2017.
  8. ^ "Ellesmere Port Town Ward by-election". www.cheshirewestandchester.gov.uk. Cheshire West and Chester Council. Retrieved 9 May 2018.
2008 Cheshire West and Chester Council election

Elections to the newly created Cheshire West and Chester Council took place on 1 May 2008. Elections occurred in all 24 wards, with each ward returning 3 councillors to the council. The wards are identical to the former Cheshire County Council wards.

From May 2008 until April 2009, the elected members formed a "shadow" council, which made preparations for the changeover from the county and borough structure to the new unitary authority structure. Thereafter, the members will serve for two years from May 2009. The next elections were held in May 2011.

2011 Cheshire West and Chester Council election

The 2011 elections to Cheshire West and Chester Borough Council were the first elections to this Council after it had been re-warded into a mixture of single-, two- and three-member wards. They took place on 5th May alongside the 2011 United Kingdom Alternative Vote referendum. The previous election held for 2008 were based on the old Cheshire County Council electoral divisions each of which returned 3 members. The 2008 elections elected 72 members to serve first on the shadow authority and then, with effect from 1 April 2009, the new Council when it took over responsibility for the delivery of local government services.

Given the re-warding that took place in time for the 2011 elections, direct comparisons between the 2008 and 2011 results are problematic. Superficially the 2011 results give the impression of a dramatic swing to Labour when compared with the 2008 results—however, this is misleading. In 2008 the Labour Party was particularly unpopular, with the local government elections taking place shortly after the '10p tax rate' had been abolished, plunging Labour support to a particular low. This unpopularity, coupled with the then large electoral wards electing 3 councillors per ward, and the first-past-the-post system, very much favoured the then leading party in the opinion polls—the Conservatives—who, in 2008, won a much greater majority than had otherwise been predicted.

The 2011 elections with the re-warding took place one year into the national Conservative–Liberal Democrat coalition at a time when support for the Liberal Democrats was at a particular low. Nationally Labour's support had rallied considerably when compared with 2008.

Before the elections in 2011 the majority Conservative party suffered a small number of defections principally almost certainly associated with existing councillors failing to be selected by the party to fight the seat of their choice.

As noted above the Conservatives had reduced in number from 55 to 50 through resignations, defections and withdrawal of the party whip associated with the processes for selection of candidates to fight the 2011 election.

Four political groups that had unsuccessfully put forward candidates in 2008, did not do so in 2011. Several deselected Conservatives stood without the party whip, but there were no other independent candidates.

2015 Cheshire West and Chester Council election

The 2015 Cheshire West and Chester Council election took place on 7 May 2015, electing members of Cheshire West and Chester Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections across the country as well as the general election.

All 75 seats were contested. Labour won a small majority with a total of 38 seats on a 3.2% swing from the Conservatives, meaning that the council moved from Conservative control to Labour control.

Cheshire West and Chester was the only council to change hands in this way in the 2015 elections, and this unique result has been variously attributed to public dissatisfaction with fracking in the area, local planning issues, the organisation and leadership of the local parties, and to a generally difficult climate for Conservatives in the area. In addition, the only Liberal Democrat (Lib Dem) seat on the council was lost, while an independent was elected to the Parkgate ward. No other minor party won a seat, but both the Green Party and United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) fielded large numbers of candidates and saw significant positive swings. Labour's Samantha Dixon became the first woman to lead the council, while the previous leader Mike Jones survived a Conservative leadership challenge and became Leader of the Opposition.

2019 Cheshire West and Chester Council election

The 2019 Cheshire West and Chester Council election took place on 2 May 2019 to elect members of Cheshire West and Chester Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections. Five fewer seats were contested because of boundary changes. No party gained overall control. The Labour party gained a seat but lost control of the council; the Conservatives lost 8 seats, while the Independents gained 4, the Liberal Democrats gained 2, and the Green party gained one.

Cheshire Council elections in Cheshire
Cheshire East Council
Cheshire West and Chester Council
Halton Borough Council
Warrington Borough Council
Cheshire County Council
Chester City Council
Congleton Borough Council
Crewe and Nantwich Borough Council
Ellesmere Port and Neston Borough Council
Macclesfield Borough Council
Vale Royal Borough Council
Districts
Councils
Local elections

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