Cheshire West and Chester Council

Cheshire West and Chester Council is the local authority of Cheshire West and Chester. It is a unitary authority, having the powers of a non-metropolitan county and district council combined. It provides a full range of local government services including Council Tax billing, libraries, social services, processing planning applications, waste collection and disposal, and it is a local education authority. The council was first elected on 1 May 2008, a year before coming into its legal powers on 1 April 2009. After an election in May 2019, no party holds overall control.[1]

Cheshire West and Chester Council
Logo-cheshire-west
Type
Type
History
Founded1 April 2009[a]
Preceded byCheshire County Council
Leadership
Cllr Mark Williams, Labour
since 3rd May 2019
Chair of Council
Cllr Bob Rudd, Labour
since 2nd May 2019
Leader of the Council
Cllr Louise Gittins, Labour
since 10th May 2019
Chief Executive
Andrew Lewis
Structure
Seats70 councillors
Cheshire West and Chester Council - 2019
Political groups
     Labour (35)
     Conservative (27)
     Independent (5)
     Liberal Democrat (2)
     Green (1)
Committees13 (excluding the cabinet)
Joint committees
Cheshire and Warrington Local Enterprise Partnership
Cheshire Fire Authority
Cheshire Police and Crime Panel
Shared Services Joint Committee (with Cheshire East Council)
Elections
First past the post (single-member wards)
Plurality-at-large (multi-member wards)
Last election
2 May 2019
Meeting place
Chester Town Hall, Chester
Wyvern House, Winsford
Website
www.cheshirewestandchester.gov.uk

Powers and functions

The local authority derives its powers and functions from the Local Government Act 1972 and subsequent legislation. It has a 'general power of competence' as described in the Localism Act 2011, i.e. it is permitted to act in any manner whatsoever which is not unlawful. For the purposes of local government, Cheshire West and Chester is one of the fifty-five unitary authorities in England. This means that is the only principal authority in its territorial jurisdiction, and it has the statutory powers and functions of both a non-metropolitan county and a non-metropolitan district council. The only exceptions to this are the fire and police services, which are still provided on a Cheshire-wide basis by joint boards composed of elected councillors and are funded by a Council Tax precept. Conversely, it is unnecessary for Cheshire West and Chester Council to set a precept for itself as it is also a billing authority.

Political control

Since the first election of the council in 2008, political control has been held by the following parties:[2]

Executive Leader Term of office Elections won
Conservative Mike Jones 15 May 2008 – 21 May 2015 2008, 2011
Labour Samantha Dixon 21 May 2015 – 3 May 2019 2015
No overall control Louise Gittins[1] 3 May 2019 – present 2019

Council seats since 2008

Election Conservative Independent Labour Liberal Democrats Green Party
2008 55 0 13 4 0
2011 42 0 32 1 0
2015 36 1 38 0 0
2019 28 4 35 2 1
Current 28 4 35 2 1

Cabinet[3]

Position Councillor Party
Leader of the Council, including Wellbeing, Culture, Leisure, Heritage and Greenspace Louise Gittins Labour
Deputy Leader of the Council, including Environment, Highways and Strategic Transport Karen Shore
Children and Families Nicole Meardon
Democracy, Workforce and Localities Paul Donovan
Housing, Regeneration and Growth Richard Beacham
Adult Social Care and Public Health Val Armstrong
Finance and Legal Carol Gahan

Committees[4]

Committee Chair Party Deputy Party
Cabinet Louise Gittins[1] Labour Karen Shore Labour
Overview and Scrutiny
Cheshire West and Chester Overview and Scrutiny Martin Barker Independent Robert Cernik Labour
Health Overview and Scrutiny
People Overview and Scrutiny Mark Stocks Conservative Peter Wheeler Labour
Places Overview and Scrutiny Sam Naylor Labour Mike Baynham Conservative
Regulatory
General Licensing Sub-Committee Peter Rooney Labour Andy Williams Labour
Licensing Act (Hearings) Sub-Committee Peter Rooney Labour Andy Williams Labour
Licensing Peter Rooney Labour Andy Williams Labour
Planning Christine Warner Labour Robert Cernik Labour
Other
Appeals Andy Williams Labour Diane Roberts Labour
Audit and Governance Robert Bisset Labour Andrew Cooper Labour
Community Governance Review Paul Donovan Labour Richard Beacham Labour
Health and Wellbeing Louise Gittins Labour Dr Chris Ritchieson N/A (NHS)
Local Plan Working Group Robert Bisset Labour
Staffing Shelia Little Labour Paul Donovan Labour
Standards Dispensation

Notes

  1. ^ The first elections to the then shadow authority were held on 1 May 2008, the first meeting was held on 15 May 2008.

References

  1. ^ a b c Phil McCann (22 May 2019). "Cheshire East Council elects first Labour leader". BBC. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  2. ^ "Cheshire West and Chester". BBC News Online. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 15 February 2013.
  3. ^ "New Cheshire West and Chester Council leader promises 'stronger communities'". Northwich Guardian. Retrieved 2019-06-01.
  4. ^ "Committee structure". cmttpublic.cheshirewestandchester.gov.uk. 2019-06-01. Retrieved 2019-06-01.
2008 Cheshire West and Chester Council election

Elections to the newly created Cheshire West and Chester Council took place on 1 May 2008. Elections occurred in all 24 wards, with each ward returning 3 councillors to the council. The wards are identical to the former Cheshire County Council wards.

From May 2008 until April 2009, the elected members formed a "shadow" council, which made preparations for the changeover from the county and borough structure to the new unitary authority structure. Thereafter, the members will serve for two years from May 2009. The next elections were held in May 2011.

2011 Cheshire West and Chester Council election

The 2011 elections to Cheshire West and Chester Borough Council were the first elections to this Council after it had been re-warded into a mixture of single-, two- and three-member wards. They took place on 5th May alongside the 2011 United Kingdom Alternative Vote referendum. The previous election held for 2008 were based on the old Cheshire County Council electoral divisions each of which returned 3 members. The 2008 elections elected 72 members to serve first on the shadow authority and then, with effect from 1 April 2009, the new Council when it took over responsibility for the delivery of local government services.

Given the re-warding that took place in time for the 2011 elections, direct comparisons between the 2008 and 2011 results are problematic. Superficially the 2011 results give the impression of a dramatic swing to Labour when compared with the 2008 results—however, this is misleading. In 2008 the Labour Party was particularly unpopular, with the local government elections taking place shortly after the '10p tax rate' had been abolished, plunging Labour support to a particular low. This unpopularity, coupled with the then large electoral wards electing 3 councillors per ward, and the first-past-the-post system, very much favoured the then leading party in the opinion polls—the Conservatives—who, in 2008, won a much greater majority than had otherwise been predicted.

The 2011 elections with the re-warding took place one year into the national Conservative–Liberal Democrat coalition at a time when support for the Liberal Democrats was at a particular low. Nationally Labour's support had rallied considerably when compared with 2008.

Before the elections in 2011 the majority Conservative party suffered a small number of defections principally almost certainly associated with existing councillors failing to be selected by the party to fight the seat of their choice.

As noted above the Conservatives had reduced in number from 55 to 50 through resignations, defections and withdrawal of the party whip associated with the processes for selection of candidates to fight the 2011 election.

Four political groups that had unsuccessfully put forward candidates in 2008, did not do so in 2011. Several deselected Conservatives stood without the party whip, but there were no other independent candidates.

2015 Cheshire West and Chester Council election

The 2015 Cheshire West and Chester Council election took place on 7 May 2015, electing members of Cheshire West and Chester Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections across the country as well as the general election.

All 75 seats were contested. Labour won a small majority with a total of 38 seats on a 3.2% swing from the Conservatives, meaning that the council moved from Conservative control to Labour control.

Cheshire West and Chester was the only council to change hands in this way in the 2015 elections, and this unique result has been variously attributed to public dissatisfaction with fracking in the area, local planning issues, the organisation and leadership of the local parties, and to a generally difficult climate for Conservatives in the area. In addition, the only Liberal Democrat (Lib Dem) seat on the council was lost, while an independent was elected to the Parkgate ward. No other minor party won a seat, but both the Green Party and United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) fielded large numbers of candidates and saw significant positive swings. Labour's Samantha Dixon became the first woman to lead the council, while the previous leader Mike Jones survived a Conservative leadership challenge and became Leader of the Opposition.

2019 Cheshire West and Chester Council election

The 2019 Cheshire West and Chester Council election took place on 2 May 2019 to elect members of Cheshire West and Chester Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections. Five fewer seats were contested because of boundary changes. No party gained overall control. The Labour party gained a seat but lost control of the council; the Conservatives lost 8 seats, while the Independents gained 4, the Liberal Democrats gained 2, and the Green party gained one.

Backford

Backford is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. It is situated between Chester and Ellesmere Port on the A41 trunk road, to the north of the Shropshire Union Canal. (Map)

Backford Cross is located about 1.5 miles (2 km) north of Backford. According to the 2001 Census, it had a population of 109.Formerly a township in the Wirral Hundred, it had a population of 138 in 1801, 155 in 1851, 141 in 1901 and 119 in 1951.St Oswald's Church is in the centre of the village, as is Backford Hall, which previously operated as offices for Cheshire West and Chester Council.

Backford Hall Golf Club (now defunct) was in existence from the late 1930s until the early 1950s.

Blacon High School

Blacon High School is a coeducational secondary school located in Blacon in the English county of Cheshire.As a foundation school, Blacon is administered by Cheshire West and Chester Council. The school is due to move into new buildings in 2017 as part of the Priority Schools Building Programme.Blacon High School offers GCSEs, BTECs and Cambridge Nationals as programmes of study for pupils. There are also some vocational courses available.

Castle Park House

Castle Park House is a former country house surrounded by extensive grounds in the market town of Frodsham in Cheshire, England. It is reputedly built on the site of Frodsham Castle, and originates from the late 18th century. It was extended in the 1850s, and its gardens were laid out by Edward Kemp. The house and most of the associated park land is held subject to the terms of a charitable trust - the Castle Park Trust. Cheshire West and Chester Council is the sole trustee of this trust. That council owns the 'top field' outright. The house and park land are used for a variety of functions. The house and park land are 'listed' in other words given special protection in planning law.

Cheshire West and Chester

Cheshire West and Chester is a unitary authority with borough status in the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. It was established on 1 April 2009 as part of the 2009 local government changes, by virtue of an order under the Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Act 2007. It superseded the boroughs of Ellesmere Port and Neston and Vale Royal and the City of Chester; its council assumed the functions and responsibilities of the former Cheshire County Council within its area. The remainder of ceremonial Cheshire is composed of Cheshire East, Halton and Warrington.

The decision to create the Cheshire West and Chester unitary authority was announced on 25 July 2007 following a consultation period, in which a proposal to create a single Cheshire unitary authority was rejected.

Cheshire West and Chester Council elections

Cheshire West and Chester is a unitary authority in Cheshire, England. It was created on 1 April 2009 replacing Chester, Ellesmere Port and Neston, Vale Royal and Cheshire County Council.

Chester Castle (parish)

Chester Castle is an area around the castle in Chester. It was historically an extra-parochial area and today remains a civil parish,

although with no inhabitants.

The parish is bounded by Castle Drive to the south, Grosvenor Street (the A483) to the west, and Castle Street and St Mary's Hill to the east. Apart from the castle/prison, the parish also includes the Crown Courts, County Hall, and the Cheshire Military Museum. In April-May 1966, the infamous Moors murders case was tried at Chester Crown Court (referred to as Chester Assizes in 1966).

It was part of the Chester Rural District, despite being in the middle of the city, and did not form part of Chester County Borough. This meant that County Hall was in the administrative county of Cheshire which it administered. The Local Government Act 1972 saw it become part of Chester District, along with the rest of Chester Rural District. Since April 2009 County Hall has been the headquarters of the Cheshire West and Chester Council.

In 1891 it had a population of 249, which had declined to 8 by 1971.

According to the 2001 Census it had no inhabitants at all.

Duddon and Burton

Duddon and Burton is a civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The parish is formed of the villages of Duddon and Burton.

Ellesmere Port Catholic High School

Ellesmere Port Catholic High School is a coeducational secondary school and sixth form located in the Whitby area of Ellesmere Port in the English county of Cheshire.It is a voluntary aided school administered by Cheshire West and Chester Council and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Shrewsbury.

Ellesmere Port Catholic High School offers GCSEs and BTECs as programmes of study for pupils, while students in the sixth form have the option to study from a range of A-levels.

Guilden Sutton

Guilden Sutton is a civil parish and village in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. It is home to 1,525 residents, two churches, a primary school, a Post Office, a pub, a village hall and several local businesses.

Justin Madders

Justin Piers Richard Madders (born 22 November 1972) is a British Labour politician. He has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for Ellesmere Port and Neston since the May 2015 general election.In the 2005 General Election, Madders unsuccessfully stood in the safe Conservative seat of Tatton, coming second to the sitting MP, George Osborne.He was appointed a member of the shadow health team in September 2015. He supported Owen Smith in the failed attempt to replace Jeremy Corbyn in the 2016 Labour Party (UK) leadership election. He resigned from his shadow cabinet position in March 2019, after defying the Labour whip in a vote on a second Brexit referendum.Before election to parliament he was an employment lawyer, and Leader of the Labour opposition on Cheshire West and Chester Council and leader of Ellesmere Port and Neston Borough Council.

List of mayors of Chester

The position of Lord Mayor of Chester was created on 10 March 1992 when the dignity was conferred on the city of Chester, England by Letters Patent as part of celebrations of 40th anniversary of the accession of Queen Elizabeth II. Prior to that the position had been that of Mayor of Chester. The Lord Mayoralty was given to Chester in recognition of its historical and economic importance. In 2009 the role of Lord Mayor of Chester was combined with that of Chairman of Cheshire West and Chester Council, but the two roles were separated again in 2015.The full title of the Mayor is ‘The Right Worshipful, the Lord Mayor of the City of Chester’.

Neston High School

Neston High School is a coeducational secondary school and sixth form with academy status located in Neston in the English county of Cheshire.Previously a community school administered by Cheshire West and Chester Council, Neston High School converted to academy status on 1 June 2012. However the school continues to coordinate with Cheshire West and Chester Council for admissions. The school moved into its brand new modern building in September 2017 which was built on the other side of Neston Receation Center to the original building. The original building has now been demolished and modern all-weather pitches have been installed along with a car-park and school drop off point.

Neston High School offers GCSEs and Cambridge Nationals as programmes of study for pupils, while students in the sixth form have the option to study from a range of A-levels and BTECs.

Newton, Chester

This article is about a suburb of Chester. See also Newtown, which lies just outside Chester city walls.

Newton is a suburb in the north-east of Chester, in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. Including the locale of Plas Newton, the area is contiguous with Upton to the north and Hoole to the south. The electoral ward involved had a population taken at the 2011 census was 9,556.Newton is made up of some privately owned residential properties, but mainly comprises a large council estate now co-owned with Cheshire West and Chester Council and run by Chester and District Housing Trust (C&DHT).

Wardle, Cheshire

Wardle is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The village lies on the Shropshire Union Canal, north west of Barbridge Junction (at SJ610570), and is 4 miles to the north west of Nantwich, and the parish also includes part of the small settlement of Wardle Bank. The total population is around 250. RAF Calveley was a flight-training station during the Second World War, and the Mark III radio telescope stood on the airfield site in 1966–96. The modern civil parish includes Wardle Industrial Estate and is otherwise largely agricultural. Nearby villages include Barbridge, Calveley and Haughton.

Whitby Park

Whitby Park is the main urban park in Ellesmere Port, Cheshire, England. It is managed by Cheshire West and Chester Council.

Ward Councillor Political party Council profile
Blacon Carol Gahan Labour Party Profile
Sheila Little Profile
Trish Richards Profile
Central and Grange Karen Shore Profile
Robert Bisset Profile
Chester City and The Garden Quarter Samantha Dixon Profile
Bob Rudd Profile
Martyn Delaney Profile
Christleton and Huntington Mark Williams Conservative Party Profile
Stuart Parker Profile
Davenham, Moulton and Kingsmead Helen Weltman Profile
Elton Watson Profile
Farndon Paul Roberts Liberal Democrats Profile
Frodsham Andrew Dawson Conservative Party Profile
Lynn Riley Profile
Gowy Rural Margaret Parker Conservative Party
Graham Heatley
Great Boughton Steve Collings Labour Party
Keith Boards Conservative Party
Handbridge Park Razia Daniels
Neil Sullivan
Hartford and Greenbank Phil Herbert Independent
Patricia Parkes Conservative Party
Helsby Paul Bowers Green
Lache Val Armstrong Conservative Party
Ledsham and Manor Peter Wheeler Labour Party
Christine Warner
Malpas Rachel Williams Conservative Party
Marbury Lynn Gibbon
Norman Wright
Phil Marshall
Neston Andy Williams Labour Party
Netherpool Diane Roberts
Newton and Hoole Richard Beacham
Adam Langan
Gill Watson
Northwich Winnington and Castle Kate Cernik
Robert Cernik
Northwich Witton Sam Naylor
Parkgate Martin Barker Independent
Rudheath Helen Treeby Conservative Party
Sandstone Hugo Deynem Conservative Party
Saughall and Mollington Simon Eardley
Shakerley Mark Stocks
Strawbery Gareth Gould Labour Party
Sutton Villages Paul Donovan
Nicole Meardon
Tarporley Eveleigh Moore Dutton Independent
Tarvin and Kelsall John Leather Conservative Party
Harry Tonge
Tattenhall Mike Jones
Upton Matt Bryan Labour Party
Jill Houlbrook Conservative Party
Weaver and Cuddington Gillian Edwards Independent
Paul Williams Conservative Party
Charles Fifield
Westminster Lisa Denson Labour Party
Whitby Groves Brian Jones
Whitby Park Peter Rooney
Willaston and Thornton Myles Hogg Conservative Party
Winsford Dene Mandy Clare Labour Party
Winsford Gravel Joanne Moorcroft
Winsford Over and Verdin Tommy Blackmore
Gina Lewis
Mike Baynham Conservative Party
Winsford Swanlow Mal Gaskill Liberal Democrats
Winsford Wharton Nathan Pardoe Labour Party
Wolverham Michael Edwardson
Local authorities in Cheshire
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Local elections

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