Cheshire East Council

Cheshire East Council is the local authority of Cheshire East, Cheshire, England. It is a unitary authority, having the powers of a non-metropolitan county and district council combined. It provides a full range of local government services including Council Tax billing, libraries, social services, processing planning applications, waste collection and disposal, and it is a local education authority. The council was first elected on 1 May 2008, a year before coming into its powers on 1 April 2009. After an election in May 2019, no party holds overall control.[3]

Cheshire East Council
Arms of Cheshire East Council
Type
Type
History
Founded1 April 2009
Preceded byCheshire County Council
Congleton Borough Council
Crewe and Nantwich Borough Council
Macclesfield Borough Council
Leadership
Mayor of Cheshire East
Cllr Barry Burkhill[1]
since 22 May 2019
Leader of the Council
Cllr Sam Corcoran, Labour
since 22 May 2019
Chief executive
Kath O'Dwyer (Acting)
since April 2017
Structure
Seats82 councillors[2]
UK Cheshire East Council 2019
Political groups
Administration
     Labour (25)
     Independent (8)
     Residents of Wilmslow (4)
     Bollington First (2)
     Alderley Edge First (1)
     Handforth Ratepayers (1)
Other parties
     Conservative (34)
     Liberal Democrats (4)
     Independent (3)
Length of term
4 years
Elections
Plurality-at-large
Last election
2 May 2019
Next election
4 May 2023
Website
www.cheshireeast.gov.uk

Powers and functions

The local authority derives its powers and functions from the Local Government Act 1972 and subsequent legislation. For the purposes of local government, Cheshire East is within a non-metropolitan area of England. As a unitary authority, Cheshire East Council has the powers and functions of both a non-metropolitan county and district council combined. In its capacity as a district council it is a billing authority collecting Council Tax and business rates, it processes local planning applications, it is responsible for housing, waste collection and environmental health. In its capacity as a county council it is a local education authority, responsible for social services, libraries and waste disposal.

Political control

Since the first election to the council in 2008 political control of the council has been held by the following parties:[4]

Executive Leader Term of office Elections
Conservative Wesley Fitzgerald 2008–2012[5] 2008, 2011
Conservative Michael Jones 2012–2016 2015
Conservative Rachel Bailey[6] 2016–2019[7]
No Overall Control Sam Corcoran[3] 2019–present 2019

In May 2019, following local elections, the Conservatives lost control of the council for the first time since it was created in 2008. On 22 May 2019, the newly appointed councillors met for the first time and elected Labour's Sam Corcoran as leader, after the party came to an agreement with independent councillors.[3] The following cabinet positions were announced on 22 May 2019:[8]

Cheshire East Council
Post Cabinet Opposition
Leader Sam Corcoran TBC
Deputy Leader Craig Browne TBC
Children and Families Dorothy Flude TBC
Adult Social Care and Health Laura Jeuda TBC
Public Health and Corporate Services Jill Rhodes TBC
Communities Mick Warren TBC
Planning Toni Fox TBC
Highways and Waste Brian Roberts TBC
Environment and Regeneration Nick Mannion TBC
Finance, IT and Communications Amanda Stott TBC

References

  1. ^ "The Mayoral Team". Cheshire East Council. 22 May 2019. Retrieved 23 May 2019.
  2. ^ "Local Democracy- Voting and Elections". Cheshire East Council. Retrieved 2014-08-26.
  3. ^ a b c Phil McCann (22 May 2019). "Cheshire East Council elects first Labour leader". BBC. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  4. ^ "Cheshire East". BBC News Online. 2008-04-19. Retrieved 2009-11-20.
  5. ^ "Cheshire East Council leader Wesley Fitzgerald to resign". Macclesfield Express. Trinity Mirror. 23 February 2012. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  6. ^ "Cabinet Members". Cheshire East Council. Retrieved 2016-03-22.
  7. ^ Howarth, Rachel (29 February 2016). "Cllr Rachel Bailey is Cheshire East Council's new leader after landslide vote". Middlewich Guardian. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  8. ^ "Cabinet members". Cheshire East Council. 22 May 2019. Retrieved 23 May 2019.
2008 Cheshire East Council election

Elections to the newly created Cheshire East Council took place on 1 May 2008. Elections occurred in all 27 wards, with each ward returning three councillors to the council. The wards were identical to the former Cheshire County Council wards.

From May 2008 until April 2009, the elected members formed a "shadow" council, which made preparations for the changeover from the county and borough structure to the new unitary authority structure. Thereafter, the members serve for two years from May 2009 with the next elections are scheduled for May 2011.

2011 Cheshire East Council election

Elections to Cheshire East Council took place on Thursday 5 May 2011. Elections occurred in all 52 wards, with each ward returning between one and three councillors to the council.

The wards were all new, having been created in a boundary review which took effect in January 2011. They replaced the previous 27 three-seat wards used in the 2008 election, which were identical to the former Cheshire County Council wards.

2015 Cheshire East Council election

The 2015 Cheshire East Council election took place on 7 May 2015 to elect members of the Cheshire East Council in England. They occurred on the same day as other local elections.

2019 Cheshire East Council election

Elections to Cheshire East Council took place on Thursday 2 May 2019 in all 52 wards, with each ward returning between one and three councillors to the council. The Conservative party party lost overall control of the council, losing 17 seats; the Labour party gained 9 seats, independents gained 6 and the Liberal Democrats gained 2.

Calveley

Calveley is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The village lies at SJ591589, 5½ miles to the north west of Nantwich. The parish also includes parts of the settlements of Barrets Green and Wardle Bank. The total population is 280 people. The area is largely agricultural and includes a short stretch of the Shropshire Union Canal. There is an Anglican parish church, a primary school and a public house. Nearby villages include Alpraham, Bunbury, Haughton and Wardle.

Cheshire East

Cheshire East is a unitary authority area with borough status in the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The local authority is Cheshire East Council.

Cheshire East Council elections

Cheshire East is a unitary authority in Cheshire, England. It was created on 1 April 2009 replacing Congleton, Crewe and Nantwich, Macclesfield and Cheshire County Council.

Cholmondeston

Cholmondeston ( CHUM-stən) is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The village lies 5 miles (8 km) to the northwest of Nantwich. Nearby villages include Aston juxta Mondrum, Barbridge, Calveley and Wettenhall. The Middlewich Branch of the Shropshire Union Canal and the Crewe–Chester railway line run through the civil parish. The area is predominantly rural, with a total population of around 150 in 2001, increasing to 175 at the 2011 Census.

Macclesfield Town Council

Macclesfield Town Council is the town council for Macclesfield which was established in 2015. Created following a Local Governance Review carried out by Cheshire East Council, the new council adopted town council status on 5 May 2015, allowing it to appoint its chairman as Mayor of Macclesfield.

Middlewich First

Middlewich First is a minor English political party based in the town of Middlewich, Cheshire. It currently holds 0 seats on the unitary Cheshire East Council. after losing 3 seats in the 2019 local elections as well as losing all 7 seats they held on Middlewich Town council.The party was registered in 2003, and won a majority on Middlewich Town Council in May 2003 by standing 8 unopposed candidates. All three borough seats in Middlewich were won in 2008. Cllr Mike Parsons said of their success that "I think it is certainly fair to say this result reflects the Middlewich public's genuine dislike of all politicians. They are sick of party politics and squabbling."

Poynton

Poynton is a town in Cheshire, England, on the easternmost fringe of the Cheshire Plain 11 miles (18 km) southeast of Manchester, 7 miles (11 km) north of Macclesfield, and 5 miles (8 km) south of Stockport.

The first mention of the manor of Poynton is in 1289. Coal was mined in Poynton from the 16th century, and the collieries, under the ownership of the Lords Vernon from 1832 until their closure in 1935, were the largest in Cheshire. Consequent urbanisation and socioeconomic development necessitated better transport links; these came with the completion of the Macclesfield Canal through Poynton in 1831 and the arrival of the Manchester and Birmingham Railway in 1845 and the Macclesfield, Bollington and Marple Railway in 1869. In the late 20th century, Poynton became a commuter town for Manchester. The population has nearly trebled since 1945, to 14,260 in 2011.

Ridley, Cheshire

Ridley is a civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England, which lies to the north east of Malpas and to the west of Nantwich. The parish is largely rural with scattered farms and buildings and no significant settlements. In 2001, the population was a little over 100. Nearby villages include Bulkeley, Bunbury, Faddiley, Peckforton and Spurstow. At the 2011 Census the population had fallen less than 100. Details are included in the civil parish of Peckforton.

Shavington Academy

Shavington Academy (formerly Shavington High School) is a coeducational secondary school, located in Rope Lane, Shavington, Cheshire East, England. It is adjacent to the Shavington Leisure Centre.

Previously a foundation school administered by Cheshire East Council, Shavington High School converted to academy status in September 2015 and was renamed Shavington Academy. However the school continues to coordinate with Cheshire East Council for admissions.

Smallwood, Cheshire

Smallwood is a civil parish and small village in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The village is approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) east of Sandbach and 3 miles south-west of Congleton. It is based in a rural area and is largely agricultural. At the 2001 census, the parish had a population of 491, increasing to 614 at the 2011 Census.There is a primary school (Smallwood Church of England Primary Academy) within the village, and also a children's day nursery attached to a farm. St John's Parish Church, built between 1843 and 1846, is Grade II listed.A Village Design Statement was created by Smallwood Parish Council, residents of Smallwood and Cheshire East Council. It gives a full description of the village, including its history. In addition it is also a planning document adopted by Cheshire East Council on 14 October 2010.

The Oaks Academy

The Oaks Academy (formerly King’s Grove High School) is a mixed secondary school located on Buchan Grove in Crewe, Cheshire, England.Previously a foundation school administered by Cheshire East Council, King’s Grove High School converted to academy status in January 2016 and was renamed the Oaks Academy. However the school continues to coordinate with Cheshire East Council for admissions.

Walgherton

Walgherton is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The village lies at SJ697489 by the junction of the A51 and B5071 roads, 3½ miles to the south east of Nantwich and 4½ miles to the south of Crewe. The civil parish also includes the small settlement of Hussey's Nook. The total population is just under 130 people. Sand has been extracted at Hough Mill Quarry. The remainder of the parish is predominantly agricultural. Nearby villages include Hatherton, Stapeley and Wybunbury.

Wardle, Cheshire

Wardle is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The village lies on the Shropshire Union Canal, north west of Barbridge Junction (at SJ610570), and is 4 miles to the north west of Nantwich, and the parish also includes part of the small settlement of Wardle Bank. The total population is around 250. RAF Calveley was a flight-training station during the Second World War, and the Mark III radio telescope stood on the airfield site in 1966–96. The modern civil parish includes Wardle Industrial Estate and is otherwise largely agricultural. Nearby villages include Barbridge, Calveley and Haughton.

Weston, Cheshire

Weston is a village (at SJ730522) and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The village lies 3 miles to the south east of Crewe. The parish also includes the small settlements of Carters Green, Gorstyhill, Rose Hill, Snape, Stowford and part of Englesea Brook, as well as the new settlements of Wychwood Park and Wychwood Village. Plans in 2015 to develop a golf course surrounding Wychwood Village for residential housing have been opposed by some residents. The plans were refused planning permission by Cheshire East Council; the developer was later unsuccessful in an appeal to the Secretary of State and the Council’s refusal was upheld. Nearby villages include Basford, Hough and Shavington.

Wilmslow Town Council

Wilmslow Town Council is the town council for the Cheshire market town of Wilmslow and was established in May 2011 following a community governance review. It is the lowest tier of local government for the town and comprises 15 Councillors, all of whom work on a purely voluntary basis, supported by a Town Clerk and an Assistant Town Clerk.

The Town is split into four wards: Wilmslow East, Wilmslow West, Lacey Green and Dean Row. Each ward is represented by multiple Councillors who are elected by the residents every four years. In the May 2015 elections three of the wards were contested. Dean Row was uncontested.

Operating within the borough of Cheshire East Council, which retains the statutory responsibilities of a principle authority, Wilmslow Town Council works within the legal framework set out for town and parish councils to enhance and supplement services and to recognise and promote local initiatives.

The primary roles for the Town Council are to enhance and supplement services provided by the primary authority, to provide services and facilities that Cheshire East Council would not otherwise provide but which Wilmslow residents value, and to support and promote local initiatives and community groups. The Town Council also has a significant role in voicing the views and concerns of residents.

The Town Council duties include:

To support and encourage community initiatives.

To support the economic vibrancy of the town

Review and comment on planning applications within the Parish

Liaise with relevant authorities regarding infrastructure/policing/community issues to represent your views and get the best advantage for the local area

Engage with all interested parties regarding current and future shape of life in the local areaDuring the financial year 2014-15 Wilmslow Town Council paid a number of grants to local charities, voluntary groups and organisations to support their work and projects.

Friends of Lacey Green Park

Incredible Edible Wilmslow

The Wilmslow Trust

Cheshire A Capella

Citizens Advice Bureau

Dean Row Guides

Food Friend

Wilmslow Clean Team

The Clink Charity

Wilmslow Show

Transition Wilmslow

Wilmslow Business Group Events Team

CoderDojoWilmslow Town Council is funded via a precept collected with the Council Tax, with Cheshire East Council passing this funding down to the Town Council. In 2014-15 this precept was £21.47 for a band D property in Wilmslow, compared to the £1,437.30 paid by a band D property to support Cheshire East Council.

Local authorities in Cheshire
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