Charlie Joiner

Charles B. Joiner Jr. (born October 14, 1947) is a former American football wide receiver who played professional football in the American Football League (AFL) and National Football League (NFL) for 18 seasons. He is best known for his career with the San Diego Chargers, with whom he spent 11 seasons. Before joining the Chargers, he played for the Houston Oilers and Cincinnati Bengals each for four seasons. He retired with the most career receptions, receiving yards, and games played of any wide receiver in NFL history. Joiner was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1996.

Charlie Joiner
No. 40, 18
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:October 14, 1947 (age 71)
Many, Louisiana
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:188 lb (85 kg)
Career information
College:Grambling State
NFL Draft:1969 / Round: 4 / Pick: 93
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:750
Receiving yards:12,146
Yards per reception:16.2
Receiving touchdowns:65
Player stats at NFL.com

Early life and college

Born in Many, Louisiana, on October 14, 1947, Joiner attended W. O. Boston High School in Lake Charles, Louisiana. He did not play football until his Junior year, but excelled as an All-State Receiver and earned a scholarship to Grambling State University to play for coach Eddie Robinson. At Grambling, Joiner played with quarterback James Harris and was a three-time All-Southwestern Athletic Conference selection.[1]

Professional football career

Joiner graduated from Grambling State University in 1969 and was drafted in the fourth round by the American Football League's Houston Oilers. He started his career as a defensive back, but he made the switch to wide receiver in his rookie year after being carted off the field from a hit by Denver Broncos running back Floyd Little.[2] Joiner played for Houston until 1972, when he was traded to the Cincinnati Bengals. In 1975, Cincinnati traded Joiner to the San Diego Chargers, with whom he remained for eleven seasons before retiring as a player after the 1986 season. Before leaving the Bengals, he set a franchise record with 200 receiving yards in a single game.[3]

It was with the Chargers' high flying "Air Coryell" offense under coach Don Coryell that Joiner had his most productive years, exceeding 1,000 yards receiving in a season four times and going to three Pro Bowls (1976, 1979–80). Joiner was selected All-Pro in 1980 and 2nd Team All-AFC in 1976. Although he never played in a Super Bowl, Joiner, quarterback Dan Fouts, tight end Kellen Winslow, and fellow receiver John Jefferson helped the Chargers reach the AFC title game in the 1980 and 1981 seasons. In the 1980 AFC championship game, Joiner caught 6 passes for 130 yards and 2 touchdowns. In January 1982, he played a key role in San Diego's 41–38 divisional postseason overtime win over the Miami Dolphins in a game that became known as The Epic In Miami. Joiner caught 7 passes for 108 yards in the game, including 2 key receptions on his team's game-winning drive in overtime. His 29-yard reception on the penultimate play of the game set up the winning field goal.

With Harold Jackson's retirement after 1983, Joiner became the NFL's active leader in receiving yards, then 4th all-time. He remained the league leader for his three remaining seasons, breaking Don Maynard's all-time record of 11,834 yards in Week 5 of 1986.[4]

Joiner finished his 18 AFL/NFL seasons with 750 receptions for 12,146 yards (16.2 average per catch) and 65 touchdowns. He retired as the then-NFL leader in career receptions, yards, and games played by a wide receiver (239).[5] At age 39, Joiner also retired as the oldest wide receiver in NFL history (since surpassed by Jerry Rice among others).[6] Joiner credited his success and longevity to Coryell: "Thanks to Coach Coryell’s offense and his revolutionary passing game, he prolonged my career, from the day I got to the Chargers until the day I retired. I will forever be grateful to him and what he did for the game of football."[7]

Accolades

In addition to good health and longevity, Joiner was an intelligent player and precise pass route runner.[8] Hall of Fame coach Bill Walsh called Joiner "the most intelligent, the smartest, the most calculating receiver the game has ever known."[9] Following his playing career, Joiner successfully transitioned into a receiver's coach with the Kansas City Chiefs and the San Diego Chargers. He was the last former American Football League player to retire from professional football.

Joiner was inducted into the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame in 1990.[10]

In 1999, he was ranked number 100 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Football Players.

Coaching career

In 1987, Chargers Head Coach, Al Saunders, hired Joiner as an assistant coach. Joiner was most recently the wide receivers coach of the San Diego Chargers from 2008 to 2012 and he retired with 44 years as a player and coach in football.[11]

References

  1. ^ http://www.profootballresearchers.org/archives/Website_Files/Coffin_Corner/18-02-641.pdf
  2. ^ Jaworski, Ron (2010). The Games That Changed the Game: The Evolution of the NFL in Seven Sundays. Random House. p. 89. ISBN 978-0-345-51795-1.
  3. ^ Regular Season Individual Records - Cincinnati Bengals
  4. ^ Charlie Joiner, game log
  5. ^ "Joiner retires". Merced Sun-Star. Associated Press. January 13, 1987. p. 10. Retrieved November 21, 2011.
  6. ^ "Charlie Joiner highlights". The Oregonian. January 14, 1987. p. D5 (61).
  7. ^ Center, Bill. "Don Coryell, ex-Chargers, Aztecs coach dies at 85". San Diego Union-Tribune. Retrieved July 2, 2010.
  8. ^ Jaworski 2010, p.81
  9. ^ "Charlie Joiner". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 21, 2011.
  10. ^ http://www.nola.com/sports/index.ssf/2014/07/louisianas_all-time_top_51_ath_3.html
  11. ^ http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000129915/article/charlie-joiner-retires-from-san-diego-chargers

External links

1971 Houston Oilers season

The 1971 Houston Oilers season was the team's 12th season, and second with the National Football League. The Oilers improved on their previous season's output of three victories, winning four games in 1971. They missed the playoffs for the second consecutive season.

The 1971 Oilers are the only team in NFL history to throw three-or-more interceptions in ten different games. (The team was 2–7–1 in those games.)

1976 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1976. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1976.

1976 San Diego Chargers season

The 1976 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 7th season in the National Football League (NFL), and its 17th overall.

1979 San Diego Chargers season

The 1979 San Diego Chargers season was the team's 20th season, and 10th in the National Football League. Their 12–4 record was tied for the best in the league in 1979.

The 1979 Chargers finished in first place in the AFC West after having finished 9–7 in 1978. The Chargers made the playoffs for the first time in 14 years. Chargers quarterback Dan Fouts threw for more than 4,000 yards, and wide receivers Charlie Joiner and John Jefferson both gained more than 1,000 yards receiving. The Chargers became the first AFC West champion to run more passing plays (541) then rushing (481).The season ended with a playoff loss to the Houston Oilers.

As part of a marketing campaign, the Chargers created their fight song, "San Diego Super Chargers".The 2006 edition of Pro Football Prospectus, listed the 1979 Chargers as one of their "Heartbreak Seasons", in which teams "dominated the entire regular season only to falter in the playoffs, unable to close the deal." Said Pro Football Prospectus of the team, "the creative [head coach] Don Coryell always designed potent offenses, but the San Diego defense didn't catch up until 1979. ... In their first playoff game, the Chargers hosted a Houston Oilers team missing running back Earl Campbell and quarterback Dan Pastorini and fell on their faces. Fouts threw five interceptions and no touchdowns, and the Chargers blew a third quarter lead and lost 17–14. The Chargers would not have the best record in the NFL again until the 2006 season. They would not have another top ten defense in points allowed until 1989. They would not win 12 games in a season until 2004. Their best shot at glory went horribly awry, thanks to the worst game in the illustrious career of Dan Fouts."

1980 All-Pro Team

The 1980 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1980. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. Pro Football Weekly chose a nose tackle due to the proliferation of 3-4 defenses in the NFL. They, and The Sporting News chose two inside linebackers.

1980 San Diego Chargers season

The 1980 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 11th season in the National Football League (NFL), and its 21st overall. the team failed to improve on their 12–4 record in 1979 and finished 11-5. They won their first playoff game in 17 years. The season ended with loss to the Raiders in the playoffs.

Dan Fouts broke his own record with over 4,500 yards passing, with 30 touchdowns. The Chargers finished #1 in total offense #2 in scoring. The defensive unit finished #6, leading the NFL with 60 QB sacks. The Chargers finished 11-5, winning the tiebreaker with the Oakland Raiders for the AFC West crown.

To help bolster a sagging running game, Running back Chuck Muncie was traded from the New Orleans Saints mid-season.The Chargers Achilles heel that season was turnovers which they led the league in giveaways. In the Divisional Round against Buffalo, a 50-yard touchdown pass from Fouts to Ron Smith in the final 3 minutes of the game lifted the Chargers to a 20-14 win. In the AFC Championship Game, big plays and turnovers got the Chargers down, 28 to 7. The Chargers comeback fell short as the Raiders hung on to win 34-27, with Oakland running out the final 7 minutes of the 4th quarter.

1981 Pro Bowl

The 1981 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 31st annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1980 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 1, 1981, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was NFC 21, AFC 7.Sam Rutigliano of the Cleveland Browns led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Atlanta Falcons head coach Leeman Bennett. The referee was Gordon McCarter.

1981 San Diego Chargers season

The 1981 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 12th season in the National Football League (NFL) and its 22nd overall. The team failed to improve on their 11–5 record from 1980 and finished 10-6. In the playoffs, they beat the Dolphins in a game known as the Epic in Miami and lost to the Bengals in a game known as the Freezer Bowl.

1981 was the second straight season in which the Chargers reached the AFC Championship Game, as well as their second consecutive loss.

Running back Chuck Muncie enjoyed his best season, running for 1,144 yards and 19 touchdowns, tying the then-NFL season record for rushing touchdowns.During this season, the Chargers lost two key players by way of trade. Before Week 3, wide receiver John Jefferson was dealt to the Green Bay Packers, while defensive end Fred Dean would be dealt to the eventual Super Bowl champion San Francisco 49ers by Week 5. The season was chronicled on September 18, 2008 for America's Game: The Missing Rings, as one of the five greatest NFL teams to never win the Super Bowl.

1983 San Diego Chargers season

The 1983 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 14th season in the National Football League (NFL), its 24th overall. the team fell from their 6–3 record from 1982 to 6-10. It was their first losing season since 1976, as it is to date the most points the Chargers have surrendered in a sixteen-game season.

Despite San Diego's disappointing 6-10 record, they led the NFL in passing yardage for the sixth consecutive season, which remains an NFL record.

1984 NFL season

The 1984 NFL season was the 65th regular season of the National Football League. The Colts relocated from Baltimore, Maryland to Indianapolis, Indiana before the season. The Colts new home field was the Hoosier Dome. The New York Jets moved their home games from Shea Stadium in New York City to Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

The season ended with Super Bowl XIX when the San Francisco 49ers defeated the Miami Dolphins 38–16 at Stanford Stadium in California. This was the first Super Bowl televised by ABC, who entered into the annual championship game rotation with CBS and NBC. This game marked the second shortest distance between the Super Bowl host stadium (Stanford, California) and a Super Bowl team (San Francisco 49ers).The 49ers became the first team in NFL history to win 15 games in a regular season and to win 18 in an entire season (including the postseason). Additionally, two major offensive records were set this season, with quarterback Dan Marino establishing a new single-season passing yards record with 5,084 (later broken by Drew Brees and Tom Brady in 2011 and by Peyton Manning in 2013), and Eric Dickerson establishing a new single-season rushing yards record with 2,105.

Also during the season, San Diego Chargers wide receiver Charlie Joiner became the all-time leader in career receptions; he set that mark in a game between the Chargers and the Pittsburgh Steelers at Pittsburgh's Three Rivers Stadium.

In a week 10 game against the Kansas City Chiefs the Seattle Seahawks set numerous NFL records for interception returns including most interception return yardage in a game and most interceptions returned for touchdowns in a game with 4 (all touchdowns over 50 yards in length). The Seahawks also tied an NFL record with 63 defensive takeaways on the season.

Salaries increased significantly over the past two seasons in the NFL, up nearly fifty percent; new Houston Oilers quarterback Warren Moon led the list at $1.1 million.

Air Coryell

In American football, Air Coryell is the offensive scheme and philosophy developed by former San Diego Chargers coach Don Coryell. The offensive philosophy has been also called the "Coryell offense" or the "vertical offense".

With Dan Fouts as quarterback, the San Diego Chargers' offense was among the greatest passing offenses in National Football League history. The Chargers led the league in passing yards an NFL record six consecutive years from 1978 to 1983 and again in 1985. They also led the league in total yards in offense 1978–83 and 1985. Dan Fouts, Charlie Joiner, and Kellen Winslow would all be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame from those Charger teams.

Freezer Bowl

In National Football League (NFL) lore, the Freezer Bowl was the 1981 American Football Conference (AFC) Championship Game between the San Diego Chargers and the Cincinnati Bengals. The game, won by the Bengals, 27–7, was played in the coldest temperature in NFL history in terms of wind chill. (The coldest in terms of air temperature was the Ice Bowl.) Air temperature was −9 °F (−22.8 °C), but the wind chill, factoring in a sustained wind of 27 miles per hour (43 km/h), was −37 °F or −38.3 °C (calculated as −59 °F or −50.6 °C using the now outdated wind chill formula in place at the time). The game was played on January 10, 1982 at Cincinnati's Riverfront Stadium, and televised by NBC, with announcers Dick Enberg and Merlin Olsen.

History of the San Diego Chargers

The professional American football team now known as the Los Angeles Chargers previously played in San Diego, California as the San Diego Chargers from 1961 to 2017 before relocating back to Los Angeles where the team played their inaugural 1960. The Chargers franchise relocated from Los Angeles to San Diego in 1961. The Chargers' first home game in San Diego was at Balboa Stadium against the Oakland Raiders on September 17, 1961. Their last game as a San Diego-based club was played at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego on January 1, 2017 against the Kansas City Chiefs, who defeated the host Chargers, 30–13.

Joiner (surname)

Joiner is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Alvin Joiner (born 1974), American rapper known as Xzibit

Charles Wycliffe Joiner (1916-2017), American judge

Charlie Joiner (born 1947), American football player and coach

Michael Joiner (born 1981), American basketball player

Rusty Joiner (born 1972), American model

List of NFL 1,000-yard receiving trios

In American football, passing, along with running, is one of the two methods of advancing the ball downfield. In order to advance the ball via passing, the ball must be caught by a receiver, tallying a reception. In addition to six pairs of teammates who have rushed for 1,000 yards each in a season, there are five trios of teammates who have caught 1,000 yards each in a season.

Los Angeles Chargers

The Los Angeles Chargers are a professional American football team based in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The Chargers compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) West division. The team was founded on August 14, 1959, and began play on September 10, 1960, as a charter member of the American Football League (AFL), and spent its first season in Los Angeles, before moving to San Diego in 1961 to become the San Diego Chargers. The Chargers joined the NFL as result of the AFL–NFL merger in 1970, and played their home games at SDCCU Stadium. The return of the Chargers to Los Angeles was announced for the 2017 season, just one year after the Rams had moved back to the city from St. Louis. The Chargers will play their home games at Dignity Health Sports Park until the 2020 opening of the Los Angeles Stadium at Hollywood Park, which they will share with the Rams.

The Chargers won one AFL title in 1963 and reached the AFL playoffs five times and the AFL Championship four times before joining the NFL (1970) as part of the AFL–NFL merger. In the 43 years since then, the Chargers have made 13 trips to the playoffs and four appearances in the AFC Championship game. In 1994, the Chargers won their lone AFC championship and faced the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XXIX, losing 49–26. The Chargers have eight players and one coach enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio: wide receiver Lance Alworth (1962–1970), defensive end Fred Dean (1975–1981), quarterback Dan Fouts (1973–1987), head coach–general manager Sid Gillman (1960–1969, 1971), wide receiver Charlie Joiner (1976–1986), offensive lineman Ron Mix (1960–1969), tight end Kellen Winslow (1979–1987), linebacker Junior Seau (1990–2002), and running back LaDainian Tomlinson (2001–2009).

Los Angeles Chargers Hall of Fame

The Los Angeles Chargers are a professional American football team in the National Football League (NFL) based in the Los Angeles Area. The club began play in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League (AFL), and spent its first season in Los Angeles before moving to San Diego in 1961. They returned to Los Angeles in 2017. The Chargers created their Hall of Fame in 1976. Eligible candidates for the Hall of Fame must have been retired for at least four seasons. Selections are made by a five-member committee chaired by Dean Spanos, Chargers vice-chairman. As of 1992, other committee members included Bob Breitbard, founder of the San Diego Hall of Champions; Ron Fowler, president of the Greater San Diego Sports Association; Jane Rappoport, president of the Charger Backers; and Bill Johnston, the team's director of public relations.The initial four members—former players Emil Karas, Frank Buncom, Bob Laraba, and Jacque MacKinnon—were inducted posthumously in 1976. From 1986 through 1992, there were no new inductions. The Los Angeles Times wrote in 1992, "The Chargers have not done a good job in recent years of recognizing their former players." Dan Fouts and Charlie Joiner were inducted in 1993. "It embarrasses me to go into the Hall of Fame before Don Coryell, because if it wasn't for Don Coryell, I wouldn't be in the Hall of Fame for the Chargers," said Fouts of his former head coach. Coryell was inducted the following year. The Chargers allowed the 2012 inductee to be determined by fans, who selected punter Darren Bennett.The members of the Hall of Fame were honored in San Diego at the Chargers Ring of Honor, founded in 2000 and viewable above the visiting team's sideline of Qualcomm Stadium on the press level. Before its introduction in 2000, the Chargers and the Oakland Raiders were the only NFL teams without a Ring of Honor. In 2013, the Chargers also inducted their 1963 AFL Championship team into their Ring of Honor; 15 members of the team were already in the team's Hall of Fame.

Many, Louisiana

Many is a town and the parish seat of Sabine Parish in western Louisiana, United States. The population was 2,706 at the 2010 census, a decrease of 183 or 6 percent from 2000.

San Diego Chargers 40th Anniversary Team

The San Diego Chargers announced their 40th Anniversary Team in 2000 to honor the top players and coaches in the history of the National Football League team. The Chargers began play in 1960 as part of the American Football League. The anniversary team included 31 players and coaches voted on by fans and a media panel. The team became the Los Angeles Chargers after relocating in 2017.

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