Charlie Jamieson

Charles Devine "Cuckoo" Jamieson (February 7, 1893 – October 27, 1969) was an American baseball player, an outfielder for the Washington Senators (1915–17), Philadelphia Athletics (1917–18) and Cleveland Indians (1919–32).[1]

Charlie Jamieson
Charlie Jamieson
Left fielder
Born: February 7, 1893
Paterson, New Jersey
Died: October 27, 1969 (aged 76)
Paterson, New Jersey
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
September 20, 1915, for the Washington Senators
Last MLB appearance
July 17, 1932, for the Cleveland Indians
MLB statistics
Batting average.303
Home runs18
Runs batted in552
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Professional career

Jamieson helped Cleveland win the 1920 American League pennant, batting .319 with 69 runs scored in 108 games. He went 5 for 15 with two runs scored in the 1920 World Series as the Indians beat the Brooklyn Robins. In 1921 he batted .310 with 94 runs scored, and in 1922 raised his average to .323 while leading the team with 183 hits. 1923 was an even better year for Jamieson, who led the American League with a career-high 222 hits while also setting personal bests in runs (130, 3rd best in the league), on-base percentage (.422), doubles (36), and triples (12) while batting .345. Jamieson hit a career-high .359 in 1924, second in the league behind Babe Ruth, while also finishing second in the league with 213 hits. He scored 98 runs and was 5th in the league with 21 stolen bases, finishing 6th in the MVP balloting. In 1925, his 109 runs scored were the 6th most in the league. Jamieson is the only outfielder who initiated triple plays twice in the same year. On May 23, 1928, his triple play helped the Indians defeat the Chicago White Sox, and he repeated the feat in a 7–3 loss to the New York Yankees on June 9.[2]

He finished his career with a .303 batting average and 1,062 runs scored over 18 major league seasons. Jamieson topped the .300 mark 8 times.

See also

References

  1. ^ Pero, Scott. "Charlie Jamieson". sabr.org. Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved 3 October 2017.
  2. ^ http://research.sabr.org/journals/fielding-feats

External links

1917 Washington Senators season

The 1917 Washington Senators won 74 games, lost 79, and finished in fifth place in the American League. They were managed by Clark Griffith and played home games at National Park.

1918 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1918 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 52 wins and 76 losses.

1919 Cleveland Indians season

The 1919 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 84–55, 3.5 games behind the Chicago White Sox.

1920 Cleveland Indians season

The 1920 Cleveland Indians season was the 20th season in franchise history. The Indians won the American League pennant and proceeded to win their first World Series title in the history of the franchise. Pitchers Jim Bagby, Stan Coveleski and Ray Caldwell combined to win 75 games. Despite the team's success, the season was perhaps more indelibly marked by the death of starting shortstop Ray Chapman, who died after being hit by a pitch on August 17.

1921 Cleveland Indians season

The 1921 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 94–60, 4 games behind the New York Yankees.

1922 Cleveland Indians season

The 1922 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 78–76, 16 games behind the New York Yankees.

1923 Cleveland Indians season

The 1923 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 82–71, 16½ games behind the New York Yankees.

1924 Cleveland Indians season

The 1924 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 67–86, ​24 1⁄2 games behind the Washington Senators.

1925 Cleveland Indians season

The 1925 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 70–84, ​27 1⁄2 games behind the Washington Senators.

1926 Cleveland Indians season

The 1926 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 88–66, 3 games behind the New York Yankees.

1927 Cleveland Indians season

The 1927 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 66–87, 43½ games behind the New York Yankees.

1928 Cleveland Indians season

The 1928 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the American League with a record of 62–92, 39 games behind the New York Yankees.

1929 Cleveland Indians season

The 1929 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 81–71, 24 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1930 Cleveland Indians season

The 1930 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 81–73, 21 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1931 Cleveland Indians season

The 1931 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record 78–76, 30 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1932 Cleveland Indians season

The 1932 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 87–65, 19 games behind the New York Yankees.

Cleveland Indians award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Cleveland Indians professional baseball team.

List of Major League Baseball career fielding errors as a left fielder leaders

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

In baseball, a left fielder (LF) is an outfielder who plays defense in left field. Left field is the area of the outfield to the left of a person standing at home plate and facing towards the pitcher's mound. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the left fielder is assigned the number 7.

Goose Goslin and Zack Wheat are the all-time leaders in errors committed by a left fielder with 183 career. Lou Brock (168), Bobby Veach (146), Duffy Lewis (123), Bob Johnson (121), Jack Graney (114), Rickey Henderson (113), Ken Williams (109), and Charlie Jamieson (104) are the only other left fielders to commit over 100 career errors.

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.