Charlie Batch

Charles D'Donte Batch[1] (born December 5, 1974) is a former American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Detroit Lions in the second round of the 1998 NFL Draft and played 15 seasons in the NFL, most of it as a backup with his hometown Pittsburgh Steelers, with whom he earned two Super Bowl rings (Super Bowl XL and Super Bowl XLIII). He played college football at Eastern Michigan.

Batch currently works for KDKA-TV in Pittsburgh as a pre-game analyst for the Steelers as well as a color commentator for their preseason games. Batch also works with Champs Sports Network as a color analyst for WPIAL high school football and basketball broadcasts.

Charlie Batch
refer to caption
Batch with the Pittsburgh Steelers in August 2007
No. 10, 16
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:December 5, 1974 (age 44)
Homestead, Pennsylvania
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:216 lb (98 kg)
Career information
High school:Munhall (PA) Steel Valley
College:Eastern Michigan
NFL Draft:1998 / Round: 2 / Pick: 60
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
TDINT:61–52
Passing yards:11,085
QB Rating:77.2
Rushing attempts:172
Rushing yards:637
Rushing touchdowns:6
Player stats at NFL.com

College career

Batch is the son of Lynne Settles, a former school teacher, and Nilesh Shah, a former Pittsburgh steel mill operator.[2] Batch had a remarkable career at Eastern Michigan University, owning almost every passing record. He also earned a degree in criminal justice. He was a local favorite when he was drafted by the Detroit Lions in the second round of the 1998 NFL Draft.

Statistics

Year Team Passing Rushing
Cmp Att Pct Yds Y/A TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD
1994 Eastern Michigan 49 78 62.8 617 7.9 7 1 156.3 23 0 0.0 1
1995 Eastern Michigan 244 421 58.0 3,177 7.5 21 17 129.7 61 52 0.9 3
1996 Eastern Michigan 39 65 60.0 518 8.0 2 2 130.9 12 -39 -3.3 0
1997 Eastern Michigan 247 434 56.9 3,280 7.6 23 11 132.8 85 110 1.3 1
Career 579 998 58.0 7,592 7.6 53 31 133.2 181 123 0.7 5

Source:[3]

Professional career

Detroit Lions

Charlie Batch was the Detroit Lions' starter through better parts of the 1998–2001 seasons. After the surprising retirement of running back Barry Sanders in 1999, Detroit struggled to find consistency in its running game,[4] and Batch was asked to assume a "hybrid" quarterback role and assist in the Lions' running game by using various QB sweeps, bootlegs, and QB draws in an attempt to keep defenders off balance. He proved to be effective, but injury prone, in his years with Detroit. In 1999, the year Sanders retired, Batch helped rally Detroit to a surprising wildcard playoff game against the Washington Redskins. Batch did not play in the game, giving way to Gus Frerotte due to injury, and Detroit lost 27–13.

The 2000 season proved to be Batch's last full season as an NFL starter. He was injured (leaving the Week 17 matchup against Chicago with a shoulder injury) in a pivotal game in which Detroit lost on a last-second field goal by Paul Edinger. The game cost the Lions a playoff berth and set into motion a radical turn of events in the Lions' front office, resulting in the hiring of Fox Sports color commentator Matt Millen as the new CEO and general manager. Millen's arrival ultimately resulted in an extreme makeover in Detroit's roster, and Batch became one of the more visible casualties.

He started the 2001 season as Detroit's starter under new head coach Marty Mornhinweg, but was injured late in 2001. Batch was replaced mid-season by Ty Detmer for whom the Cleveland Browns received a fourth round pick, but had already planned to cut him. Detmer immediately came in as a starter only to throw seven interceptions against his former team. Batch was eventually released by the Lions that offseason for stated salary cap reasons. Batch had been deemed expendable due in part to the team's drafting of Joey Harrington with their first-round pick, and Millen had gone on record in his desire to find a starting quarterback other than Batch earlier that year. Still, Batch passed for over 9,000 yards with Detroit, reaching sixth on the Lions' all-time list. Ironically, Batch would ultimately last longer in the NFL than Harrington, who would prove to be a draft bust and was out of the NFL by 2009.

Pittsburgh Steelers

The Pittsburgh Steelers signed him to a one-year contract for 2002 as a backup, but he did not play. The move to initially sign Batch was not a surprise, given that Batch was from Pittsburgh and the Steelers' current Director of Football Operations Kevin Colbert initially drafted Batch in Detroit. Despite not playing in 2002 (being third string behind Kordell Stewart and Tommy Maddox, who split the year as the starters), Batch became popular with Steeler fans, partly due to having grown up in nearby Homestead, Pennsylvania but also because of his charity works (see below).

His contract was renewed by the Steelers, and Batch saw some action in 2003. In 2004, Batch spent the season on injured reserve after offseason knee surgery. In 2005, he became the second-string quarterback for the Steelers, playing behind Ben Roethlisberger. During 2005, an injury to Roethlisberger gave Batch two starting opportunities, yielding two victories. In the process, Batch became the first Pittsburgh-area native to start for the team at quarterback since Terry Hanratty, a native of Butler, Pennsylvania, started for a few games during his rookie season in 1969 before becoming a backup the following season to Terry Bradshaw.

He backed up Ben Roethlisberger during Super Bowl XL, and the Steelers' 21-10 victory made Batch a Super Bowl Champion.

On March 14, 2006, Charlie Batch signed a 3-year deal, through the 2008 season.[5]

He also was one of several Pittsburgh Steelers players that visited Ben Roethlisberger in the hospital to hear of his condition after his motorcycle accident on June 12, 2006.

Batch was again tapped to fill in for Roethlisberger to start the Steelers 2006 season when Roethlisberger had to have an emergency appendectomy the week before the season started. Batch had his best game in over 4 years, throwing for 209 yards, 3 touchdowns, and no interceptions. He also threw the first touchdown pass of the 2006 regular season. Batch temporarily replaced Ben Roethlisberger in week 7 in Atlanta when Roethlisberger went down with a concussion. Batch completed 8 of 13 passes for 195 yards and 2 touchdowns, including a 70-yard touchdown pass to Hines Ward.

On August 8, 2008, Batch sustained a broken clavicle in the second quarter of a pre-season game against the Philadelphia Eagles at Heinz Field.[6] The team signed former Jacksonville Jaguars starter Byron Leftwich. Batch was placed on season-ending injured reserve on August 30.

On April 14, 2009, Batch, who was an unrestricted free agent after the 2008 season, re-signed with the Steelers.

On November 22, 2009, Batch took over in a week 11 game against the Kansas City Chiefs in overtime after Ben Roethlisberger was injured. During the overtime drive, he threw 1 pass for 17 yards, putting them 2 yards out of field goal range. However, on third down, the Steelers opted to run (rather than relying on Batch's arm), which resulted in yards lost and a punt. Batch's wrist was injured during the game and required surgery. He missed 6 weeks, ending his regular season.

On March 26, 2010, Batch re-signed with the Steelers for another 2 seasons.

With Roethlisberger being suspended four games by the NFL to start the 2010 season, and with both Dennis Dixon and Byron Leftwich out with injured knees, Batch led the Steelers to a 38-13 win over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in week three. Batch tied a career-high with three touchdown passes. Because of this, Steelers coach Mike Tomlin stated that Batch had earned a starting role in week 4 versus Baltimore (which the Steelers lost 17-14).

Batch signed a one-year contract to remain with the Steelers on April 16, 2012.

After a sternoclavicular (SC) joint and rib injury to Ben Roethlisberger in week 10 of the 2012 season and a rib injury to Byron Leftwich in week 11, Batch was the starting quarterback for the week 12 matchup vs. the Cleveland Browns, during which the Pittsburgh Steelers turned the ball over eight times (three interceptions by Batch and five fumbles by five other players) and lost 20-14. A week later, Batch led the Steelers to victory over the division-leading Baltimore Ravens 23-20 in Baltimore. Batch drove the Steelers down the field, connecting with Heath Miller for a game-tying touchdown late in the fourth quarter. He then led the game-winning drive, which culminated in a Shaun Suisham 42-yard field goal.

With the Steelers drafting Oklahoma quarterback Landry Jones in the 2013 NFL Draft, the team announced that Batch would not be returning to the team for 2013, ending his 11-year tenure with the team. At the time of Batch's departure his tenure was the second-longest in team history for a quarterback, behind only Terry Bradshaw,[7] although this feat has subsequently been surpassed by Roethlisberger.

Statistics

Year Team GP GS Passing Rushing
Cmp Att Pct Yds Y/A TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD
1998 DET 12 12 173 303 57.1 2,178 7.2 11 6 83.5 41 229 5.6 1
1999 DET 11 10 151 270 55.9 1,957 7.2 13 7 84.1 28 87 3.1 2
2000 DET 15 15 221 412 53.6 2,489 6.0 13 15 67.3 44 199 4.5 2
2001 DET 10 9 198 341 58.1 2,392 7.0 12 12 76.8 12 45 3.8 0
2003 PIT 4 0 4 8 50.0 47 5.9 0 0 68.2 1 11 11.0 0
2005 PIT 4 2 23 36 63.9 246 6.8 1 1 81.5 11 30 2.7 1
2006 PIT 8 1 31 53 58.5 492 9.3 5 0 121.0 13 15 1.2 0
2007 PIT 7 1 17 36 47.2 232 6.4 2 3 52.1 12 -7 -0.6 0
2009 PIT 1 0 1 2 50.0 17 8.5 0 0 79.2 0 0 0.0 0
2010 PIT 3 2 29 49 59.2 352 7.2 3 3 76.2 7 30 4.3 0
2011 PIT 4 1 15 24 62.5 208 8.7 0 1 72.9 3 -2 -0.7 0
2012 PIT 2 2 45 70 64.3 475 6.8 1 4 64.9 0 0 0.0 0
Career 81 55 908 1,604 56.6 11,085 6.9 61 52 77.2 172 637 3.7 6

Source:[1]

Broadcasting career

Although Batch did not officially announce his retirement from the NFL, he took a Steelers pre-game studio analyst job with KDKA-TV for the 2013 season alongside KDKA-TV sports anchor Bob Pompeani and ex-Steeler defensive lineman Edmund Nelson, effectively ending his NFL career. He continued in this role for the 2014 season.

In 2015, Batch replaced the retiring Nelson as KDKA-TV's color commentator for preseason games, while becoming the main studio analyst for the Steelers pre-game coverage prior to the national airing of The NFL Today. Former teammate Chris Hoke replaced Nelson for the post-game show.[8]

Charity

In 2006, Batch was presented with the first Jerome Bettis Award for Humanity and Community Service for his work supporting children through his Best of the Batch Foundation and for efforts to upgrade local football fields and basketball courts for area kids.[9] This annual award is presented to a Pittsburgh individual who demonstrates the image of the award title. Batch was chosen because of his commitment to his hometown of Homestead, Pennsylvania, by bringing to the area programs for the children through his Best of the Batch Foundation and upgrading basketball courts and football fields for the kids to use.[9]

Batch has also been recognized for his efforts with underprivileged urban youth. The Schramm-McCracken Prize was bestowed on Charlie Batch in 2002 by the Three Rivers District of the Loyal Order of Moose in large part for his creation and work at the Charlie Batch Urban Pumpkin Patch and Gardens. The CBUPP was a created as a way to help fight hunger, using Urban Agriculture and local gang activity by employing inner city youth in a sustainable, green future.

References

  1. ^ a b "Charlie Batch". pro-football-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 17, 2016.
  2. ^ Kovacevic, Dejan (November 26, 1998). "Homestead cheers native son Batch". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
  3. ^ "Charlie Batch". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on October 11, 2016. Retrieved September 17, 2016.
  4. ^ Trotter, Jim. "Bolts miss starters but not plays as defense stars". San Diego Union-Tribune. Archived from the original on November 29, 1999.
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 6, 2008. Retrieved August 10, 2008.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ Bouchette, Ed (August 8, 2008). "Batch exits Eagles game with fractured collarbone". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved August 9, 2008.
  7. ^ Kyle Curry. "Charlie Batch says that Steelers are in a rebuilding phase". Pittsburgh Sporting News. Retrieved May 5, 2015.
  8. ^ Former Steelers Charlie Batch and Chris Hoke join KDKA-TV broadcasts Archived May 7, 2015, at the Wayback Machine Steelers.com (May 5, 2015)
  9. ^ a b "Batch brings some joy to a joyless place". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. December 20, 2008.

External links

1995 Eastern Michigan Eagles football team

The 1995 Eastern Michigan Eagles football team represented Eastern Michigan University in the 1995 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their first season under head coach Rick Rasnick, the Eagles compiled a 6–5 record (5–3 against conference opponents), finished in fifth place in the Mid-American Conference, and outscored their opponents, 363 to 335. The team's statistical leaders included Charlie Batch with 3,177 passing yards, Savon Edwards with 732 rushing yards, and Steve Clay with 999 receiving yards. Batch went on to play 15 years in the National Football League.

1997 Eastern Michigan Eagles football team

The 1997 Eastern Michigan Eagles football team represented Eastern Michigan University in the 1997 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their third season under head coach Rick Rasnick, the Eagles compiled a 4–7 record (4–5 against conference opponents), finished in fourth place in the West Division of the Mid-American Conference, and were outscored by their opponents, 352 to 329. The team's statistical leaders included Charlie Batch with 3,280 passing yards, Savon Edwards with 627 rushing yards, and Ta-if Kumasi with 710 receiving yards. Batch went on to play 15 years in the National Football League.

1998 Detroit Lions season

The 1998 Detroit Lions season was their 69th in the league. The team failed to improve upon their previous season's output of 9–7 and did not make a repeat playoff appearance, instead posting their third 5–11 mark in seven seasons. This was the last year Barry Sanders would ever play in the NFL.

1999 Detroit Lions season

The 1999 Detroit Lions season was their 70th in the league. The team improved upon their previous season's output of 5–11 and qualified for the playoffs, with a .500 record at 8-8. It would be their sixth playoff appearance of the decade, capping one of the most successful 10-year stretches in franchise history.

In 2004, Football Outsiders' Mike Tanier named the 1999 Lions as one of the "worst playoff teams ever":The Lions had just lost Barry Sanders to an abrupt retirement and started the season with second-year pro Charlie Batch at quarterback before he was lost to an injury and replaced by Gus Frerotte.

The team got out to a 6–2 start, including a win over the eventual Super Bowl Champion St. Louis Rams, that made the Lions a surprise contender at the midway point in the season. After topping out at 8-4, however, the Lions collapsed and lost their final four games.

2000 Detroit Lions season

The 2000 Detroit Lions season was the team’s 71st season in the National Football League. Coming off of a Wildcard playoff appearance with an 8–8 record in 1999, the Lions improved to finish 9–7, but missed the playoffs thanks to a Christmas Eve home loss to the 4-11 Chicago Bears.

This would be the Lions' sixth winning season, and seventh season at .500 or better, in 10 years -- capping one of the best decades in the franchise's history. It was also the franchise's last winning season until 2011.

The Lions’ home attendance was 606,716 while their attendance on the road was 523,383 for a total attendance of 1,130,099. Bobby Ross resigned after the ninth game of the season and was replaced by Gary Moeller.

2005 Pittsburgh Steelers season

The 2005 Pittsburgh Steelers season was the franchise's 73rd season as a professional sports franchise and as a member of the National Football League. It was the 6th season under the leadership of general manager Kevin Colbert and the 14th under head coach Bill Cowher. The Steelers failed to improve upon their 15–1 record from 2004 and in 2005, the Steelers struggled. At one point, they were 7–5 and in danger of missing the playoffs but rose to defeat the Bears on December 11 eventually finishing the season at 11–5.

The Steelers qualified for the playoffs as a wild-card team as the #6 seed and became just the second team ever (and the first in 20 years), and beat the #3 seed Bengals (11–5), the top-seeded Colts (14–2), and the #2 seed Broncos (13–3) to become the American Football Conference representative in Super Bowl XL. They defeated the NFC Champion Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XL to secure their league-tying fifth Super Bowl title. In doing so, they also became the first team since the 1970 AFL-NFL merger to win a Super Bowl without playing a single home playoff game until the 2007 Giants.

Central Michigan–Eastern Michigan football rivalry

The Central Michigan–Eastern Michigan football rivalry is an annual college football game between Central Michigan University (CMU) and Eastern Michigan University (EMU). The football series between the two universities dates back to 1902 and is the oldest rivalry in the Mid-American Conference (MAC), having begun five years before the Central Michigan–Western Michigan rivalry and six years before the Miami–Ohio rivalry. With 95 games having been played, it is also the most frequently-played series between MAC schools.Michigan State Normal, as EMU was then known, dominated the series in the first 25 meetings, compiling a record of 14–8–3 from 1902 to 1936. The tide then shifted to CMU which compiled a 37–5–3 from 1937 to 1992. From 1993 to 2017, CMU has won 15 games to 10 for EMU.

Chris Hoke

Christopher L. "Chris" Hoke (born April 6, 1976) is a former American football defensive lineman in the National Football League. He spent his entire eleven-year professional career with the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Eastern Michigan Eagles football statistical leaders

The Eastern Michigan Eagles football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Eastern Michigan Eagles football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Eagles represent Eastern Michigan University in the NCAA's Mid-American Conference.

Although Eastern Michigan began competing in intercollegiate football in 1891, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1951. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1951, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

However, the effect isn't as extreme for Eastern Michigan as it is in many other schools. While the NCAA only recognizes bowl game statistics as part of single-season and career statistics in 2002 and later, the Eagles have only played in one bowl game since then (the 2016 Bahamas Bowl). Similarly, the Eagles are the only MAC school not to have played in the MAC Football Championship Game.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season.

George Izo

George William Izo (born September 20, 1937) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Washington Redskins, as well as the St. Louis Cardinals, Detroit Lions, and the Pittsburgh Steelers. He played college football at the University of Notre Dame.

List of Detroit Lions starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Detroit Lions of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Lions.

List of Eastern Michigan Eagles in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Eastern Michigan Eagles in the NFL Draft.

List of Pittsburgh Steelers figures in broadcasting

The Steelers franchise has a rich history of producing well-known sportscasters over the years: the most famous of which is Myron Cope, who served as a Steelers radio color commentator for 35 seasons (1970-2004).

Additionally, several former players for the Pittsburgh Steelers picked up the broadcast microphone:

Lynn Swann (wide receiver, 1974-1982) - Starting in 1978 was a sideline reporter for ABC Sports. Over the 2005 and 2006 NFL seasons, he had taken a leave of absence to unsuccessfully pursue the governor's office of Pennsylvania. Swann has also had several Hollywood roles, making cameos in 1998's The Waterboy, 1993's The Program and 1991's The Last Boy Scout. His TV cameos include Saturday Night Live and The Drew Carey Show.

Merril Hoge (running back, 1987-1993) - Has hosted sports shows on ESPN and ESPN2 since 1996 most notably NFL Matchup, Football Friday and NFL 2Night/ NFLLive. He has also had hosting duties on ABC/ESPN's Great Outdoor Games. He also served as an analyst for the Steelers radio network alongside Bill Hillgrove and the late Myron Cope.

Mark Malone (quarterback, 1980-1987) - Began his career as a sports reporter for Pittsburgh's WPXI-TV from 1991–1994, from 1994 to 2004 he hosted nationally-televised sports shows for ESPN, including NFL 2Night, NFL Matchup and the X-Games. From 2004-2008 he was director of sports broadcasting at CBS2 Chicago. Now Hosts his own program weeknights from 7 PM - 10 PM on NBC Sports Radio.

Jerome Bettis (running back, 1998-2011) - Formerly an analyst of NBC Sunday Night Football's Football Night in America pre-game with Bob Costas 2006–2009, also is host of the Pittsburgh broadcast The Jerome Bettis Show 1998–2007 on KDKA-TV and 2007-Present on WPXI-TV.

Hines Ward (wide receiver, 1996-2005) - Former analyst of NBC Sunday Night Football's Football Night in America. Pregame/halftime analyst for Notre Dame Football on NBC (2013–2015), Now is a Sports Analyst for CNN since 2016 and hosts The Hines Ward Show 2013–Present on WPXI-TV.

Bill Cowher (head coach, 1992-2006) - Co-host of CBS Sports NFL Today on CBS as a studio analyst, joining Dan Marino, Shannon Sharpe, and Boomer Esiason. Cowher had a cameo in 1998's The Waterboy, and in 2007 Cowher appeared in the ABC reality television series Fast Cars and Superstars: The Gillette Young Guns Celebrity Race, featuring a dozen celebrities in a stock car racing competition. Cowher matched up against Gabrielle Reece and William Shatner. Cowher has also made a cameo in The Dark Knight Rises with several other Steelers players, as the coach of the Gotham Rogues.

Terry Bradshaw (quarterback, 1970-1983) - Started as a Guest commentator for CBS NFL Playoff broadcasts from 1980–1982, after retirement he joined Verne Lundquist at CBS full-time as a game anaylst on what would become one of the top rated sports broadcasts. In 1990, he went from the broadcast booth to the pre-game studio shows anchoring the NFL Today pre-game shows on CBS and later on Fox NFL Sunday. He has in recent years started to host regular features in addition to the show, "Ten yards with TB" and the "Terry Awards". In addition to broadcasting Bradshaw has had appearances in several major motion pictures (most notably Smokey and the Bandit II, Black Sunday, and Failure to Launch) as well as spokesman for Radio Shack and SaniKing among others in commercials. He also has made many guest appearances on sitcoms from Married... with Children to Evening Shade and Wee Willie Winkie.

Kordell Stewart (quarterback 1998-2003) - Currently an ESPN Analyst for all NFL shows and an Analyst for TuneIn's NFL Coverage.

Tunch Ilkin (offensive tackle, 1980–1992) - current Steelers radio color commentator; Pittsburgh CW Network In the Locker Room Host 2006–Present.

Craig Wolfley (offensive lineman, 1980-1989) - current Steelers radio sideline reporter; Pittsburgh CW Network In the Locker Room Host 2006–Present.

Rod Woodson (defensive back, 1987–1996), (1997 with 49ers), (1998-2001 with Ravens), & (2002-2003 with Raiders) - current Analysts for NFL Network 2003–Present.

Jack Ham (linebacker, 1971–1982) - did color commentary for the Steelers on KDKA-TV during the NFL Preseason into the early 2000s before leaving and being replaced by former teammate Edmund Nelson. Ham also co-hosted some pregame and postgame shows on the station, but was replaced by Nelson in those roles as well. Since 2000, Ham has been the color analyst on the Penn State football radio network.

Edmund Nelson (defensive lineman, 1982-1988) - served as the color analyst for Pittsburgh Steelers pre-season games and participated as a co-host to Bob Pompeani in KDKA-TV's regular season pre-game program Steelers Kickoff until retiring in 2015.

Charlie Batch (quarterback, 2002-2012) - took a Steelers pre-game studio analyst job with KDKA-TV for the 2013 season alongside KDKA-TV sports anchor Bob Pompeani and ex-Steeler defensive lineman Edmund Nelson, effectively ending his NFL career. He continued in this role for the 2014 season. In 2015, Batch replaced the retiring Nelson as KDKA-TV's color commentator for preseason games, while becoming the main studio analyst for the Steelers pre-game coverage prior to the national airing of The NFL Today. Former teammate Chris Hoke replaced Nelson for the post-game show.

Tony Dungy (defensive back, 1977-1979) - as an analyst on NBC's Football Night in America.

List of Pittsburgh Steelers starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League.

Scott Mitchell (quarterback)

William Scott Mitchell (born January 2, 1968) is a former professional American football player who was a quarterback in the National Football League for 12 seasons. He played for the Miami Dolphins, Detroit Lions, Baltimore Ravens and Cincinnati Bengals of the NFL, and also the Orlando Thunder of the World League of American Football. Mitchell played college football for the University of Utah.

Stoney Case

Stoney Jarrod Case (born July 7, 1972 in Odessa, Texas) is a former quarterback for three teams in the National Football League and three teams in the Arena Football League.

Terry Hanratty

Terrence Hugh Hanratty (born January 19, 1948) is a former American football quarterback who played in the National Football League during the 1960s and 1970s. He earned two Super Bowl rings as the backup quarterback for the Pittsburgh Steelers. Terry's son Conor also plays football for Notre Dame as an offensive guard.

Todd Hons

Todd Hank Hons (born September 5, 1961) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League and Arena Football League. He played for the Detroit Lions and Detroit Drive. He played college football for the Arizona State Sun Devils.

Tom Bradley (American football)

Not to be confused with Tom Brady.Thomas Mark Bradley is an American football coach and former collegiate player. He currently serves as the defensive backs coach for the Pittsburgh Steelers. Before joining the Steelers, he was the defensive coordinator for the UCLA Bruins football team.Previously, Bradley was the Senior Associate Head Coach of the West Virginia Mountaineers football team. He is best known for his four-decade association with Penn State Nittany Lions football as a player and coach. Bradley served as the interim head coach of Penn State following Joe Paterno's dismissal nine games into his 46th season as head coach and left the Penn State program in 2012.

Bradley has been recognized for his defense’s outstanding performances. He was named the Associated Press Defensive Coordinator of the Year in 2005 and was named Rivals.Com Defensive Coordinator of the Year in 2008. Additionally Rivals.com had Bradley ranked as the 2nd best defensive coordinator in the nation before he was named interim head coach in 2011.

From 2004 to 2011 Penn State’s defense ranked 3rd in the nation in scoring defense (16.4 ppg) and was 5th in total defense (298.7 ypg). In 2009, the Nittany Lions ranked in the top 15 nationally in the six primary defensive categories. Additionally, from 2004 to 2009 Penn State finished in the top 15 in total and scoring defense. From 2004 through most of the 2011 season, Penn State held 53 of its 88 opponents to 17 points or fewer. 10 of those 53 came in Penn State’s illustrious 2009 campaign.

Bradley was inducted into the Cambria County Hall of Fame in 1998, and served as the honorary chair of the Special Olympics in 2006. He was inducted into the Western Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame in May 2014. Inducted classmates included longtime Steeler Charlie Batch and former Nike employee Sonny Vaccaro. He was also inducted into the Pittsburgh Athletic Association Hall of Fame in January 2015, where he is one of only four collegiate football coaches to receive this honor.

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