Charley Taylor

Charles Robert Taylor (born September 28, 1941) is a former American football player, a wide receiver in the National Football League for fourteen seasons, all with the Washington Redskins. Taylor was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1984.

With Taylor, the Redskins made the playoffs five times (19711974, 1976) and reached the Super Bowl once (VII), after the 1972 season.

Charley Taylor
Charley-Taylor-Golf
No. 42
Position:Wide receiver, halfback
Personal information
Born:September 28, 1941 (age 77)
Grand Prairie, Texas
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school:Grand Prairie (TX) Dalworth
College:Arizona State
NFL Draft:1964 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3
AFL draft:1964 / Round: 2 / Pick: 9
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:649
Receiving yards:9,110
Yards per reception:14.0
Receiving touchdowns:79
Rushing yards:1,488
Rushing touchdowns:11
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early life

Born in Grand Prairie, Texas, Taylor was the second of seven children—four girls and three boys.[1] He was raised by his mother Myrtle and step father James Stevenson. Myrtle was a domestic, a chef, a butcher, and an owner of a restaurant and Stevenson constructed parts for airplanes.[1]

Taylor started playing sports while in junior high school and by the eighth grade he was playing football, baseball, basketball and competing in track.[1]

High school career

Taylor played high school football at Dalworth High School (the former segregated black high school, now an elementary school by the name of David Daniels. Dalworth High students moved to Grand Prairie High School).[1] He also ran the high hurdles, threw the discus and shot put, and competed in the long jump for the track team. The school did not have a baseball team, but Taylor played baseball in a summer league. He was named All-State in track and football.[1]

College career

Taylor played college football at Arizona State University in Tempe as a halfback and defensive back.[2] He was selected as an All-American two years in a row and was also selected to the All-Western Athletic Conference team.[2] Following his final season, Taylor played in the East-West Shrine Game, the Hula Bowl, and the All-American Bowl.[2] He also played in the College All-Star Game against the Chicago Bears in August 1964 and was named the Most Valuable Player of the game.[3][4][5][6]

Taylor also pitched and played third base for the Sun Devils baseball team. However, during baseball practice, he was hit on a knee by a line drive, which ended his baseball career.[1]

Taylor was inducted into the Arizona State Sports Hall of Fame as a charter member in 1975.[6]

Professional career

Taylor was the third overall selection of the 1964 NFL draft, taken by the Washington Redskins.[2] He was also selected in the AFL draft, taken ninth by the Houston Oilers. Taylor signed with Washington and won the UPI rookie of the year award as a running back,[7] and became the first rookie in 20 years to finish in the NFL's top 10 in both rushing (sixth with 755 yards) and receiving (eighth with 53 catches for 814 yards).[2] His 53 receptions were a record for running backs at that time.[2]

Although known as a successful running back, Taylor was switched to wide receiver in 1966 and led the NFL in receiving in both 1966 and 1967.[2] He played that position for the rest of his career and had a record-tying seven seasons with 50 or more receptions.[2] In the season finale in 1975, Taylor passed Don Maynard and became the NFL's all-time receptions leader with his 634th career catch on December 21 against the Philadelphia Eagles.[8][9] Following Maynard's retirement in 1973, Taylor was the league's active leader in receiving yards for four seasons. He began 1974 with 7,470 yards, then 11th all-time,[10] and climbed up to 4th.[11]

Taylor retired in June 1978 as the NFL's all-time leading receiver with 649 receptions,[12] for 9,110 yards and 79 touchdowns.[2] With 1,488 yards rushing and some kick return yardage, he totaled 10,803 combined net yards. With 11 rushing touchdowns and 79 on receptions, Taylor scored 540 points in his career.[2] He earned first- or second-team All-NFL honors six times and was selected to play in eight Pro Bowls.[2]

Taylor was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1984 and was selected as one of the 70 Greatest Redskins of all time.[13] In 1999, he was ranked number 85 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Football Players.[14]

Coaching career

After retiring, Taylor was hired to work in the Redskins' front office with Bobby Mitchell as a scout.[1] When Joe Gibbs became head coach in 1981, he selected Taylor to be the receivers coach.[1] He served on the coaching staff through 1993 under Richie Petitbon, but was not retained by new head coach Norv Turner in March 1994, ending three decades with the franchise.[15]

After football

After he left coaching, Taylor worked for Jerry’s Ford in the Washington metropolitan area and sold boats for Fountain Boats in Annapolis, Maryland. He now does speaking engagements and serves as a consultant to the Redskins.[1] In addition, the Charley Taylor Recreation Center in his native Grand Prairie, Texas has his namesake.

Personal life

Taylor and his wife Patricia have been married since 1965 and live in Reston, Virginia. They have three children, Elizabeth, Erica, and Charles, Jr., and three grandchildren, Robyn, Jordyn, and Nathan.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Whatever Happened To.... Charley Taylor". Capital News Services. Archived from the original on November 4, 2006. Retrieved June 20, 2008.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Charley Taylor's HOF Profile". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved June 20, 2008.
  3. ^ Lea, Bud (August 8, 1964). "Bears rally for 28-17 win". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 2, part 2.
  4. ^ McHugh, Roy (August 8, 1964). "Mira, Taylor real all-stars, Bears find". Pittsburgh Press. p. 6.
  5. ^ "Chicago dumps All-Stars, 28-17". Eugene Register-Guard. Oregon. Associated Press. August 8, 1964. p. 1B.
  6. ^ a b "Arizona State Sun Devils - History". College Football History. Retrieved June 20, 2008.
  7. ^ Ragsdale, W.B., Jr. (December 10, 1964). "Redskins' Charley Taylor selected 'rookie of year'". Gettysburg Times. Associated Press. p. 5.
  8. ^ Seppy, Tom (December 22, 1975). "Turnovers topple Redskins". Free Lance-Star. Fredericksburg, Virginia. Associated Press. p. 10.
  9. ^ "Washington Redskins: 1970s". Washington Redskins. Archived from the original on June 13, 2008. Retrieved June 20, 2008.
  10. ^ Career receiving yards, 1973 leaderboard
  11. ^ Career receiving yards, 1977
  12. ^ "Charley Taylor retires". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. Florida. Associated Press. June 2, 1978. p. 2F.
  13. ^ "History: 70 Greatest Redskins". Washington Redskins. Archived from the original on May 31, 2008. Retrieved June 20, 2008.
  14. ^ "Football's 100 Greatest Players". The Sporting News. Archived from the original on June 1, 2008. Retrieved June 19, 2008.
  15. ^ "Redskins fire Charley Taylor". New York Times. Associated Press. March 2, 1994. Retrieved March 10, 2016.

External links

1961 Arizona State Sun Devils football team

The 1961 Arizona State Sun Devils football team was an American football team that represented Arizona State University in the Border Conference during the 1961 college football season. In their fourth season under head coach Frank Kush, the Sun Devils compiled a 7–3 record (3–0 against Border opponents), won the conference championship, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 287 to 163.The team's statistical leaders included Joe Zuger with 879 passing yards, Nolan Jones with 411 rushing yards, and Charley Taylor with 235 receiving yards.

1962 Arizona State Sun Devils football team

The 1962 Arizona State Sun Devils football team was an American football team that represented Arizona State University in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) during the 1962 college football season. In their fifth season under head coach Frank Kush, the Sun Devils compiled a 7–2–1 record (1–1 against WAC opponents), finished in second place in the WAC, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 304 to 126.The team's statistical leaders included John Jacobs with 1,263 passing yards, Tony Lorick with 704 rushing yards, and Dale Keller with 358 receiving yards.Gene Felker, Bill Kajikawa, Paul Kemp, Dick Mansperger, and Dick Tamburo were assistant coaches. The team captain was tight end Roger Locke. The Sun Devils finished 6-1-1 at home and 1-1 on the road. Home games were played at Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, Arizona.

1963 Arizona State Sun Devils football team

The 1963 Arizona State Sun Devils football team was an American football team that represented Arizona State University in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) during the 1963 college football season. In their sixth season under head coach Frank Kush, the Sun Devils compiled an 8–1 record (3–0 against WAC opponents), won the WAC championship, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 249 to 122.The team's statistical leaders included John Torok with 600 passing yards, Tony Lorick with 805 rushing yards, and Herman Harrison with 371 receiving yards.Gene Felker, Bill Kajikawa, Paul Kemp, Jack Stovall, and Dick Tamburo were assistant coaches. The Sun Devils finished 5–1 at home and 3–0 on the road. Home games were played at Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, Arizona.

1964 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in the NFL in 1964. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1966 All-Pro Team

The Associated Press (AP), United Press International (UPI), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and New York Daily News selected All-Pro players following the 1966 NFL season.

1967 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1967. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1971 Washington Redskins season

The 1971 Washington Redskins was the team's 40th in the National Football League, and their 35th in Washington, D.C.. The 1971 was the first with the Redskins for coach George Allen, who had been the head coach of the Los Angeles Rams for the previous five seasons.

Coming into the 1971 season, the team had not made it to the post-season for 26 seasons. The Redskins had had only four winning seasons since their last playoff berth in 1945, the most recent a 7-5-2 campaign in 1969 under Vince Lombardi, who died of colon cancer in September 1970.Allen was Washington's fourth coach in as many seasons. Lombardi succeeded Otto Graham, and Bill Austin took over when Lombardi fell mortally ill.

Despite a broken left ankle suffered by leading receiver Charley Taylor in their week six loss to the Kansas City Chiefs which forced him to miss the remainder of the season, the Redskins went 9–4–1, good for second place in the NFC East, and a wild card berth, where they would ultimately fall to San Francisco, 24–20.

1974 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1974. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1974.

1974 Washington Redskins season

The 1974 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 43rd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 38th in Washington, D.C.. the team matched on their 10–4 record from 1973. It's also notable for being Deacon Jones' first and only season with the Redskins; as well as being his final year in the NFL.

Arizona State Sun Devils football

The Arizona State Sun Devils football team represents Arizona State University in the sport of American football. The Sun Devils team competes in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the South Division of the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12). Arizona State University has fielded a football team since 1897. The Sun Devils are currently led by head coach Herm Edwards and play their home games at Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, Arizona. The Sun Devils have won seventeen conference titles, including three Pac-12 titles.A number of successful and professional football players once played for ASU. The school has 3 unanimous All-Americans and 16 consensus selections. Among the most lauded players the school has produced are Pat Tillman, Terrell Suggs, Mike Haynes, Darren Woodson, Charley Taylor, and John Henry Johnson.

In addition to its players, ASU's football program has had several notable head coaches, including Hall of Famers Dan Devine and John Cooper and national champion Dennis Erickson. The all-time school wins leader is Hall of Fame coach Frank Kush, for whom Frank Kush Field at Sun Devil Stadium is named. Kush also consistently led the Sun Devils to victory against the Arizona Wildcats, ASU's traditional rival, losing to the Wildcats only twice between 1963 and 1979.

Bill McPeak

William Patrick McPeak (July 24, 1926 – May 7, 1991) was an American football player and National Football League coach.

Ishmon Bracey

Ishmon Bracey (January 9, 1899 or 1901 – February 12, 1970), sometimes credited as Ishman Bracey, was an American Delta blues singer-guitarist. Alongside his contemporary Tommy Johnson, Bracey was a highly influential bluesman in Jackson, Mississippi, and was one of the area's earliest figures to record blues material. Bracey's recordings included "Trouble Hearted Blues" and "Left Alone Blues", both of which appear on several compilation albums.

List of National Football League annual receptions leaders

This is a list of National Football League players who have led the regular season in receptions each year.

List of Washington Redskins first-round draft picks

In American football, the Washington Redskins joined the National Football League in 1932 as the Boston Braves. In 1933, the name was changed to the Boston Redskins, and finally, in 1937 the Redskins moved to Washington, D.C. The Redskins' first selection as an NFL team was Riley Smith, a blocking back from Alabama. The team's most-recent first-round selection was Jonathan Allen, a defensive lineman from Alabama.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft known as the "NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting", which is more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.The Redskins have selected number one overall twice: Harry Gilmer and Ernie Davis. The team has also selected number two overall three times and number three overall five times. The Redskins have selected players from the University of Alabama four times, the University of Miami three times, and Penn State University three times. Four eventual Hall of Famers were selected by the Redskins in the first round: Sammy Baugh, Darrell Green, Art Monk, and Charley Taylor.Two Washington Redskins first-round draft picks have died during their football careers. The first was Ernie Davis, who was chosen as the first overall pick in 1962. After being traded to the Cleveland Browns for Bobby Mitchell and Leroy Jackson, Davis was diagnosed with leukemia and died before playing a game with the Browns. The other was Sean Taylor, the Redskins' first round pick in 2004, who was fatally shot in November 2007 during his fourth season with the team.

List of Washington Redskins receiving leaders

The list of Washington Redskins receiving leaders includes single-season and career records for each of three statistics: yardage, number of receptions, and receiving touchdowns, as well as single-game records for receptions and receiving yards. The Redskins compete in the East Division of the National Football Conference. The franchise was founded as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise. The team changed their name to the Redskins in 1933 and moved to Washington, D.C. in 1937.The Redskins have played over one thousand games. In those games, the club won five professional American football championships including two NFL Championships and three Super Bowls. The franchise captured ten NFL divisional titles and six NFL conference championships.The Redskins won the 1937 and 1942 Championship games, as well as Super Bowl XVII, XXII and XXVI. They also played in and lost the 1936, 1940, 1943 and 1945 Championship games, as well as Super Bowl VII and XVIII. They have made 22 postseason appearances, and have an overall postseason record of 23 wins and 17 losses. Only five teams have appeared in more Super Bowls than the Redskins: the Pittsburgh Steelers (eight), Dallas Cowboys (eight), Denver Broncos (eight), New England Patriots (eight) and San Francisco 49ers (six); the Redskins' five appearances are tied with the Oakland Raiders and Miami Dolphins.

List of Washington Redskins rushing leaders

The List of Washington Redskins football rushing leaders includes lists of Washington Redskins rushing single–season and career records for yardage, carries and touchdowns by Washington quarterbacks and running backs. The Redskins compete in the East Division of the National Football Conference. The franchise was founded as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise. The team changed their name to the Redskins in 1933 and moved to Washington, D.C. in 1937.The Redskins have played over one thousand games. In those games, the club won five professional American football championships including two NFL Championships and three Super Bowls. The franchise captured ten NFL divisional titles and six NFL conference championships.The Redskins won the 1937 and 1942 Championship games, as well as Super Bowl XVII, XXII and XXVI. They also played in and lost the 1936, 1940, 1943 and 1945 Championship games, as well as Super Bowl VII and XVIII. They have made twenty-two postseason appearances, and have an overall postseason record of 23 wins and 17 losses. Only four teams have appeared in more Super Bowls than the Redskins: the Dallas Cowboys (eight), Pittsburgh Steelers (six), Denver Broncos (six), and New England Patriots (six); the Redskins' five appearances are tied with the San Francisco 49ers, Oakland Raiders and Miami Dolphins.

Super Bowl VII

Super Bowl VII was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Miami Dolphins and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Washington Redskins to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1972 season. The Dolphins defeated the Redskins by the score of 14–7, and became the first and still the only team in NFL history to complete a perfect undefeated season. They also remain the only Super Bowl team to be shut out in the second half and still win. The game was played on January 14, 1973, at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, the second time the Super Bowl was played in that city. At kickoff the temperature was 84 °F (29 °C), making the game the warmest Super Bowl.This was the Dolphins' second Super Bowl appearance after losing Super Bowl VI. They posted an undefeated 14–0 regular season record before defeating the Cleveland Browns and the Pittsburgh Steelers in the playoffs. The Redskins were making their first Super Bowl appearance after posting an 11–3 regular season record and playoff victories over the Green Bay Packers and the Dallas Cowboys. Despite being undefeated, the Dolphins were actually one point underdogs, largely based on the weakness of their regular season schedule.Super Bowl VII was largely dominated by the Dolphins, and is the second lowest-scoring Super Bowl to date with a total of only 21 points (3 touchdown and 3 extra points), behind the 13–3 score in Super Bowl LIII. The only drama was during the final minutes of the game, in what was later known as "Garo's Gaffe". Miami attempted to cap off their 17–0 perfect season with a 17–0 perfect score shutout with a 42-yard field goal by Garo Yepremian, but instead the game and the season was jeopardized when his kick was blocked. Instead of falling on the loose ball, the Dolphins kicker picked it up, attempted a forward pass, but batted it in the air, and Redskins' cornerback Mike Bass (who was Garo's former teammate on the Detroit Lions years earlier) caught it and returned it 49 yards for a touchdown. This remains the longest period in a Super Bowl for one team to be shut out, as Washington was held scoreless until 2:07 remained in the fourth quarter. Because of Garo's Gaffe, what was a Miami-dominated game became close, and the Dolphins ended up having to stop Washington's final drive for the tying touchdown as time expired.

Dolphins safety Jake Scott was named Most Valuable Player. He recorded two interceptions for 63 return yards, including a 55-yard return from the end zone during the 4th quarter. Scott became the second defensive player in Super Bowl history (after linebacker Chuck Howley in Super Bowl V) to earn a Super Bowl MVP award.

Tony Lorick

William Anthony Lorick (May 25, 1941 – February 17, 2013) was a professional American football running back in the National Football League (NFL) for six seasons with the Baltimore Colts and New Orleans Saints. He played college football at Arizona State University. He was a teammate of future Hall of Fame player Charley Taylor. He died in 2013 at the age of 71.

Washington Redskins

The Washington Redskins are a professional American football team based in the Washington metropolitan area. The Redskins compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member of the National Football Conference (NFC) East division. The team plays its home games at FedExField in Landover, Maryland; its headquarters and training facility are at Inova Sports Performance Center at Redskins Park in Ashburn, Virginia and the Redskins Complex in Richmond, Virginia, respectively.

The Redskins have played more than one thousand games since their founding 87 years ago in 1932, and are one of only five franchises in the NFL to record over six hundred regular season and postseason wins, reaching that mark in 2015. The Redskins have won five NFL Championships (the latter three in Super Bowls), and have captured fourteen divisional titles and six conference championships. It was the first NFL franchise with an official marching band and the first with a fight song, Hail to the Redskins.The team began play in Boston as the Braves in 1932, and became the "Redskins" the following year. In 1937, the team relocated to Washington, D.C. The Redskins won the 1937 and 1942 NFL championship games, as well as Super Bowls XVII, XXII, and XXVI. They have been league runner-up six times, losing the 1936, 1940, 1943, and 1945 title games, and Super Bowls VII and XVIII. With 24 postseason appearances, the Redskins have an overall postseason record of 23–18. Their three Super Bowl wins are tied with the Oakland Raiders and Denver Broncos, behind the Pittsburgh Steelers and New England Patriots (six each), San Francisco 49ers and Dallas Cowboys (five each), and the Green Bay Packers and New York Giants (four each).All of the Redskins' league titles were attained during two 10-year spans. From 1936 to 1945, the Redskins went to the NFL Championship six times, winning two of them. The second period lasted between 1982 and 1991 where the Redskins appeared in the postseason seven times, captured four Conference titles, and won three Super Bowls out of four appearances. The Redskins have also experienced failure in their history. The most notable period of general failure was from 1946 to 1970, during which the Redskins posted only four winning seasons and did not have a single postseason appearance. During this period, the Redskins went without a single winning season during the years 1956–1968. In 1961, the franchise posted their worst regular season record with a 1–12–1 showing. Since their last Super Bowl victory following the end of the 1991 season, the Redskins have only won the NFC East three times, made five postseason appearances, and had nine seasons with a winning record.

According to Forbes, the Redskins are the fourth most valuable franchise in the NFL and the tenth most valuable overall in the world as of 2018, valued at approximately US$3.1 billion. They also set the NFL record for single-season attendance in 2007, and have the top ten single-season attendance totals in the NFL. Over the team's history, the name and logo have drawn controversy, with many criticizing it as offensive to Native Americans.

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