Charley Johnson

Charley Lane Johnson (born November 22, 1938) is a former American football quarterback and retired professor of chemical engineering. He played in the National Football League (NFL) for 15 years with three teams: the St. Louis Cardinals, Houston Oilers, and Denver Broncos.

Charley Johnson
No. 12
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:November 22, 1938 (age 80)
Big Spring, Texas
Career information
High school:Big Spring (TX)
College:New Mexico State
NFL Draft:1960 / Round: 10 / Pick: 109
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
TDINT:170–181
Yards:24,410
QB Rating:69.2
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

College career

A native of Big Spring, Texas, Johnson initially was set to play football with a scholarship at Schreiner Institute, but the school dropped football the season he arrived. He then transferred to New Mexico State University, but did so with a scholarship to play basketball instead and had to walk-on to play football there, though he eventually won the starting job at quarterback.[1]

During his college football career at New Mexico State he became the only person to date to be named Most Valuable Player of the Sun Bowl in consecutive years, winning the award in 1959 and 1960.[2] He is a member of the NMSU Sports Hall of Fame and is the only player in the history of the NMSU football program to have his jersey number (33) retired.

Professional career

He was a late-round draft pick by both the San Diego Chargers of the AFL and St. Louis Cardinals of the NFL, opting to go to St. Louis. After just 13 attempts his 1961 rookie season, he became the Cardinal's primary starter for the next five years. He was named to the NFL Pro Bowl in 1963 after career-bests 3,280 passing yards and 28 passing touchdowns, and was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated twice, on the December 14, 1964 and November 1, 1965. In 1964, he led the league with 223 completions, 420 attempts, 3,045 passing yards, and 24 interceptions. In 1966, he had a league-leading four 4th quarter comebacks. He played back-up to Jim Hart in 1967, and despite starting just two games, again led the league with two 4th quarter comebacks in 1968. He split time with Hart in 1969 before being traded to Houston. There he started 14 games in two seasons (1970–71), before ending his career with a four-year stint in Denver. He started 9 games for the Broncos in 1972, and all 14 games for the 7–5–2 squad in 1973. In 1974, his 14th season, he led the league for the first time in yards per attempt with 8.1. He began his final year with a 90-yard touchdown pass to Rick Upchurch against the Kansas City Chiefs, the only 90+ yard pass that decade by a Bronco.[3] As of 2017, his 16.45 yards per attempt in the game remains a franchise record, and he is a member of the Denver Broncos Ring of Fame

He retired in 1975 with a 59–57–8 record as a starter, with 1,737 completions (at the time, ranked 13th all-time in professional football) on 3,392 attempts (13th), for 24,410 yards (14th), 170 touchdowns (15th), 181 interceptions (14th) and a passer rating of 69.2 (20th).[4]

Outside of football

An engineering major at NMSU, Johnson obtained his bachelor's degree in chemical engineering at NMSU with a 4.0 GPA in 1961. Johnson then continued his academic pursuits during his NFL career and obtained master's and doctoral degrees in chemical engineering from Washington University in St. Louis while concurrently playing in the NFL. While an undergraduate, Johnson was part of NMSU's Army ROTC; he used his graduate studies to delay his commission until 1967, when he was called into active duty. He was deemed unfit for combat, but was stationed with and worked for NASA as a second lieutenant in the United States Army Reserve for two years (while simultaneously still playing for the Cardinals and working on his doctoral studies).[5][6] After his football career and military service were over, he worked in industry, opening Johnson Compression Services in Houston in 1981 and working as an engineering and product development consultant until 1999.[7] In 2000, he was hired to be the head of his New Mexico State’s chemical engineering department, a position he held until 2004, then becoming a professor in the department until his retirement in May 2012.[6] Johnson was also briefly the interim head coach of the NMSU football team during the off-season, following the firing of Hal Mumme in January 2009.[7]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on December 3, 2017. Retrieved April 25, 2018.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Charley Johnson - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 31, 2018 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org. Archived from the original on December 3, 2017. Retrieved April 25, 2018.
  3. ^ See List Archived December 15, 2017, at the Wayback Machine of 90+ passing TDs by Broncos.
  4. ^ See pro-football-reference.com Archived February 4, 2018, at the Wayback Machine lists.
  5. ^ "NFL legend/engineering professor to retire in May". nmsu.edu. Archived from the original on December 3, 2017. Retrieved April 25, 2018.
  6. ^ a b "Where Are They Now: Charley Johnson". denverbroncos.com. Archived from the original on December 27, 2017. Retrieved April 25, 2018.
  7. ^ a b epopulate. "Ag great continues to support program - Las Cruces Bulletin". www.lascrucesbulletin.com. Archived from the original on December 3, 2017. Retrieved April 25, 2018.
1959 New Mexico State Aggies football team

The 1959 New Mexico State Aggies football team represented New Mexico State University in the Border Conference during the 1959 college football season. In their second year under head coach Warren B. Woodson, the Aggies compiled an 8–3 record (2–2 against conference opponents), finished in third place in the conference, and defeated North Texas State in the 1959 Sun Bowl.The team's statistical leaders included Charley Johnson with 1,449 passing yards, Pervis Atkins with 971 rushing yards, and R. Cassell with 519 receiving yards. For the first time in what proved to be four consecutive years, a New Mexico State back won the NCAA rushing title, Pervis Atkins in 1959, Bob Gaiters in 1960, and Preacher Pilot in 1961 and 1962.

Head coach Warren Woodson was later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

1960 Sun Bowl

The 1960 Sun Bowl featured the New Mexico State Aggies and the Utah State Aggies. This was the 27th Sun Bowl (26th held between college teams), and was played at Kidd Field in El Paso, Texas.

1973 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1973 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 24th in the National Football League. They began the season hoping to improve on their previous years' output of 8–5–1, and looking to make the playoffs for the fourth consecutive season. However, the team finished 5–9 and failed to qualify for the playoffs.

Billy Stevens

Billy Stevens (born William Samuel Stevens) is a former quarterback in the National Football League. Stevens was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the third round of the 1968 NFL Draft. He played two seasons with the team. He was later acquired by the Chicago Bears, but did not appear in a game for them.

During his college football career at Texas Western College (now The University of Texas at El Paso) he became the second player (after Charley Johnson) to be named Most Valuable Player of the Sun Bowl twice, winning the award in 1965 and 1967. He was a two-time All-American, and was the NCAA’s all-time passing yardage leader at the conclusion of his senior season.

Bob Naponic

Robert Andrew Naponic (born March 9, 1947) is a retired professional American football quarterback who played primarily for the Houston Oilers of the National Football League. His NFL career lasted but a single season, 1970. That season was also the first of the Oilers' 40 seasons in the NFL after the AFL–NFL merger. He played at the collegiate level at the University of Illinois. In his sole year with the Oilers, Naponic was third on the depth chart behind Charley Johnson and Jerry Rhome. Up until the final game for the 1970 season, he had thrown only one pass, for an incompletion in a 44–0 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals. His final game took place at the Cotton Bowl against the Dallas Cowboys. With injuries to Rhome and Johnson, Naponic took over the quarterback duties against the Doomsday Defense. He completed 6 of 19 passes for a net of 65 yards 52–10 Oiler loss.His son, Jackson, later played football as a fullback at Texas Christian University while pursuing a finance degree.

Charley Johnson (wrestler)

Charles "Charley" Frithiof Johnson (January 31, 1887 – September 17, 1967) was an American wrestler who competed in the 1920 Summer Olympics. He was born in Göteborg.

In 1920, he won the bronze medal in the freestyle wrestling middleweight class after winning the bronze medal match against Angus Frantz.

Jacky Lee

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Jim Hart (American football)

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List of Arizona Cardinals starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Cardinals.

List of Denver Broncos starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the team.

List of Tennessee Titans starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Tennessee Titans of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Titans.

Mason County War

The Mason County War, sometimes called the Hoodoo War in reference to masked members of a vigilance committee, was a period of lawlessness ignited by a "tidal wave of rustling" in Mason County, Texas in 1875 and 1876. The violence entailed a series of mob lynchings and retaliatory murders involving multiple posses and law enforcement factions, including the Texas Rangers. The conflict took the lives of at least 12 men and resulted in a climate of bitter "national prejudice" against local German-American residents in the following years.

New Mexico State Aggies football

The New Mexico State Aggies football team represents New Mexico State University in NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) college football as an independent. Although New Mexico State remains a member of the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) for other sports, the WAC ceased to offer football as a sport after the 2012 season due to a realignment in which most of its football-playing members left for other conferences.On September 12, 2012, New Mexico State announced that it would stay in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) and become an independent. New Mexico State returned to the Sun Belt Conference (of which it was formerly a full member) for football only in 2014; however, on March 1, 2016, the Sun Belt Conference announced via teleconference that New Mexico State's football associate membership would not be renewed following the 2017 FBS season.

New Mexico State Aggies football statistical leaders

The New Mexico State Aggies football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the New Mexico State Aggies football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Aggies represent New Mexico State University in the NCAA's Sun Belt Conference.Although New Mexico State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1894, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1954. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1954, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

The Aggies haven't played in a bowl game since playing in the 1960 Sun Bowl. However, the Aggies did accumulate many yards of offense during Hal Mumme's four-year stint as head coach from 2005 through 2008.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season.

Paul Smith (defensive end)

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Smith wore number 70 with the Broncos and was inducted into the Denver Broncos' Ring of Fame in 1986 along with quarterbacks Frank Tripucka and Charley Johnson.

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Wrestling at the 1920 Summer Olympics – Men's freestyle middleweight

The men's freestyle middleweight was a Catch as Catch Can wrestling, later freestyle, event held as part of the wrestling at the 1920 Summer Olympics programme. It was the second appearance of the event. Middleweight was the median category, and included wrestlers weighing up to 69 kilograms.

A total of 18 wrestlers from twelve nations competed in the event, which was held from Wednesday, August 25 to Friday, August 27, 1920.

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