Charles T. Saxton

Charles Terry Saxton (July 2, 1846 in Clyde, Wayne County, New York – October 23, 1903 in Rochester, Monroe County, New York) was an American lawyer and politician from New York.

Charles T. Saxton
Charles T. Saxton

Life and Politics

He was the son of Daniel Saxton and Eliza A. Saxton. He was educated at the Clyde High School. He was a member of the Young Men's Debating Club in Cortland (which later became the Delphic Fraternity.)

In 1861, he joined the 19th Regiment of New York Volunteers, and finished the American Civil War as a major. He fought in the Red River Campaign and in the Battle of Port Hudson. Afterwards he studied law and was admitted to the bar. He was a Justice of the Peace, and President of the Village of Clyde.

He was an alternate delegate to the 1884 Republican National Convention, and a delegate to the 1900 Republican National Convention.

He was a member of the New York State Assembly (Wayne Co., 1st D.) in 1887, 1888 and 1889. In 1888, as Chairman of the Judiciary Committee, he took charge of the Ballot Reform Bill and secured its passage in both Assembly and Senate, but it was vetoed by Gov. David B. Hill. The next year, he had the bill passed again, but it was vetoed again by Gov. Hill.

He was a member of the New York State Senate from 1890 to 1894, sitting in the 113th, 114th, 115th, 116th (all four 28th D.) and 117th New York State Legislatures (26th D.); and was President pro tempore in 1894. In 1890, considering the governor's objections, he made a few changes to the Ballot Reform Bill and had it passed again, and it was finally enacted. He also was largely instrumental for the Electric Execution Bill to be passed and enacted.

In 1891, he was Chancellor of Union College, and the College conferred the title of LL.D. on him.

In the session of 1892, he made a strong but unsuccessful fight against the re-apportionment of the state, and for his refusal to vote on an enumeration bill (voting reapportionment) he and two other senators were declared guilty of contempt by Lt. Gov. William F. Sheehan and their names taken from the roll. But they were supported by the judiciary committee in their position, were purged of contempt and their names restored.[1] [2]

He was the Lieutenant Governor of New York from 1895 to 1896, elected on the Republican ticket with Levi P. Morton at the New York state election, 1894. On November 19, 1896, his wife Helen M. Saxton died at Clyde.

On March 30, 1897, he was appointed one of the first judges of the New York Court of Claims, to take office on January 1, 1898, for a six-year term. Until the end of 1897, this body had been the Board of Claims, with three commissioners. He was chosen Chief Judge, and died in office.

Because of his failing health, he went in the fall of 1903 to Clifton Springs, New York, but did not get better. After several weeks, he entered the City Hospital at Rochester, and died a week later.

See also

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  • [3] His career, in NYT on September 19, 1894 (giving birthdate erroneously as July 25)
  • [4] His wife's death notice in NYT on November 20, 1896
  • [5] Appointed to the Court of Claims. in NYT on March 31, 1897
  • [6] Obit in NYT on October 24, 1903
  • [7] Grip's Historical Souvenir of Cortland, 1899.
  • Cortland Evening Standard, Fri., April 12, 1895.
New York Assembly
Preceded by
William Wood
New York State Assembly
Wayne County, 1st District

1887–1889
Succeeded by
John P. Bennett
New York State Senate
Preceded by
John Raines
New York State Senate
28th District

1890–1893
Succeeded by
Cornelius R. Parsons
Preceded by
Thomas Hunter
New York State Senate
26th District

1894
Succeeded by
John Raines
Political offices
Preceded by
Jacob A. Cantor
President pro tempore of the New York State Senate
1894
Succeeded by
Edmund O'Connor
Preceded by
William F. Sheehan
Lieutenant Governor of New York
1895–1896
Succeeded by
Timothy L. Woodruff
110th New York State Legislature

The 110th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 4 to May 26, 1887, during the third year of David B. Hill's governorship, in Albany.

112th New York State Legislature

The 112th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 1 to May 16, 1889, during the fifth year of David B. Hill's governorship, in Albany.

113th New York State Legislature

The 113th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 7 to May 9, 1890, during the sixth year of David B. Hill's governorship, in Albany.

114th New York State Legislature

The 114th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 6 to April 30, 1891, during the seventh year of David B. Hill's governorship, in Albany.

115th New York State Legislature

The 115th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 5 to April 26, 1892, during the first year of Roswell P. Flower's governorship, in Albany.

117th New York State Legislature

The 117th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 2 to April 27, 1894, during the third year of Roswell P. Flower's governorship, in Albany.

118th New York State Legislature

The 118th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 2 to May 16, 1895, during the first year of Levi P. Morton's governorship, in Albany.

119th New York State Legislature

The 119th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 1 to April 30, 1896, during the second year of Levi P. Morton's governorship, in Albany.

1888 New York state election

The 1888 New York state election was held on November 6, 1888, to elect the Governor, the Lieutenant Governor and a judge of the New York Court of Appeals, as well as all members of the New York State Assembly.

1894 New York state election

The 1894 New York state election was held on November 6, 1894, to elect the Governor, the Lieutenant Governor and a judge of the New York Court of Appeals, as well as all members of the New York State Assembly. Besides, a new State Constitution and four other constitutional amendments were proposed to the electorate, and were all accepted. Furthermore, the inhabitants of New York County and adjacent communities were asked if they wanted to join the proposed enlarged New York City, a project known as The Consolidation.

Charles Saxton

Charles Saxton is the name of:

Charles Saxton (sportsman) (1913–2001), New Zealand rugby and cricket player

Charles T. Saxton (1846–1903), Lieutenant-Governor of New York

Cornelius R. Parsons

Cornelius R. Parsons (May 22, 1842 in York, New York – January 30, 1901 in Rochester, New York) was Mayor of Rochester for seven consecutive two-year terms between 1876 and 1890.

He was the son of State Senator Thomas Parsons (1814–1873). He was a lumber mill co-owner. He was elected to City Council in 1867. He was a member of the New York State Assembly (Monroe Co., 2nd D.) in 1891. He was a member of the New York State Senate from 1892 until his death in 1901, sitting in the 115th, 116th (both 29th D.), 117th, 118th (both 28th D.), 119th, 120th, 121st, 122nd, 123rd and 124th New York State Legislatures (all six 43rd D.).

Delphic Fraternity

The Delphic Fraternity, Inc., also known as Delphic of Gamma Sigma Tau, is a historic multicultural fraternity originally founded in New York State in 1871 and re-established in 1987. The fraternity can trace its origin back to the Delphic Society founded in 1850.

Edmund O'Connor

Edmund O'Connor (November 1848 near Mallow, County Cork, Ireland – July 15, 1898, Binghamton, Broome County, New York) was an American lawyer and politician from New York. He was President pro tempore of the New York State Senate in 1895.

Fremont Cole

Fremont Cole (September 18, 1856 Covert, Seneca County, New York – November 15, 1915 Little Neck, Queens, New York City) was an American lawyer and politician.

Jacob A. Cantor

Jacob Aaron Cantor (December 6, 1854, New York City – July 2, 1921, Manhattan, New York City) was an American lawyer and politician from New York. He was a United States Representative from 1913 to 1915.

John Raines

John Raines (May 6, 1840, Geneva, Ontario County, New York – December 16, 1909, Canandaigua, Ontario County, New York) was an American lawyer and politician from New York. He authored the 1896 Raines Law, which prohibited liquor sales on Sundays, except in hotels, which had the unintended consequence of fostering prostitution.

Timothy L. Woodruff

Timothy Lester Woodruff (August 4, 1858 – October 12, 1913) was an American businessman and politician. A leader of the Republican Party in the state of New York, Woodruff is best remembered for having been elected three terms as the Lieutenant Governor of the state, serving in that capacity from 1897 to 1902.

William F. Sheehan

William Francis Sheehan (November 6, 1859 – March 14, 1917) was an American lawyer and politician.

Governors
Lieutenant
governors

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