Charles Scribner's Sons

Charles Scribner's Sons, or simply Scribner's or Scribner, is an American publisher based in New York City, known for publishing American authors including Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Kurt Vonnegut, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Stephen King, Robert A. Heinlein, Thomas Wolfe, George Santayana, John Clellon Holmes, Don DeLillo, and Edith Wharton.

The firm published Scribner's Magazine for many years. More recently, several Scribner titles and authors have garnered Pulitzer Prizes, National Book Awards and other merits. In 1978 the company merged with Atheneum and became The Scribner Book Companies. In turn it merged into Macmillan in 1984.[1]

Simon & Schuster bought Macmillan in 1994.[2] By this point only the trade book and reference book operations still bore the original family name. The former imprint, now simply "Scribner," was retained by Simon & Schuster, while the reference division has been owned by Gale since 1999. As of 2012, Scribner is a division of Simon & Schuster under the title Scribner Publishing Group which also includes the Touchstone Books imprint.[3]

The president of Scribner as of 2017 is Susan Moldow (who also held the position of publisher from 1994 to 2012), and the current publisher is Nan Graham.[4]

Charles Scribner's Sons
Scribner building
Parent companySimon & Schuster (trade), Gale (reference)
Founded1846
FounderCharles Scribner I,
Isaac D. Baker
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters location153-157 Fifth Avenue, New York City
DistributionWorldwide
Publication typesBooks
Fiction genresAmerican literature
Owner(s)CBS Corporation (trade), Cengage Learning (reference)

History

The firm was founded in 1846 by Charles Scribner I and Isaac D. Baker as "Baker & Scribner." After Baker's death, Scribner bought the remainder of the company and renamed it the "Charles Scribner Company." In 1865, the company made its first venture into magazine publishing with Hours at Home.

In 1870, the Scribners organized a new firm, Scribner and Company, to publish a magazine entitled Scribner’s Monthly. After the death of Charles Scribner I in 1871, his son John Blair Scribner took over as president of the company. His other sons Charles Scribner II and Arthur Hawley Scribner would also join the firm, in 1875 and 1884. They each later served as presidents. When the other partners in the venture sold their stake to the family, the company was renamed Charles Scribner's Sons.

The company launched St. Nicholas Magazine in 1873 with Mary Mapes Dodge as editor and Frank R. Stockton as assistant editor; it became well known as a children's magazine. When the Scribner family sold the magazine company to outside investors in 1881, Scribner’s Monthly was renamed the Century Magazine. The Scribners brothers were enjoined from publishing any magazine for a period of five years.

In 1886, at the expiration of this term, they launched Scribner's Magazine. The firm's headquarters were in the Scribner Building, built in 1893, on lower Fifth Avenue at 21st Street, and later in the Charles Scribner's Sons Building, on Fifth Avenue in midtown. Both buildings were designed by Ernest Flagg in a Beaux Arts style.

The children's book division was established in 1934 under the leadership of Alice Dalgliesh. It published works by distinguished authors and illustrators including N.C. Wyeth, Robert A. Heinlein, Marcia Brown, Will James, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, and Leo Politi.

As of 2011 the publisher is owned by the CBS Corporation.[5]

Simon & Schuster reorganized their adult imprints into four divisions in 2012.[3] Scribner became the Scribner Publishing Group and would expand to include Touchstone Books which had previously been part of Free Press.[6] The other divisions are Atria Publishing Group, Simon & Schuster Publishing Group, and the Gallery Publishing Group. The new Scribner division would be led by Susan Moldow as president.[3]

Presidents

Notable authors

Notable authors under Charles Scribner II

Notable authors under Charles Scribner's Sons

Notable authors under Maxwell Perkins and John Hall Wheelock

Notable authors under Simon & Schuster

Simon & Schuster has published thousands of books from thousands of authors. This list represents some of the more notable authors (those who are culturally significant or have had several bestsellers) from Scribner since becoming part of Simon & Schuster. For a more extensive list see List of Simon & Schuster authors.

Names

  • Baker & Scribner, until the death of Baker in 1850
  • Charles Scribner Company
  • Charles Scribner's Sons
  • Scribner

Bookstores

The Scribner Bookstores are now owned by Barnes & Noble.

See also

References

  1. ^ Mitgang, Herbert (1984-04-26). "MACMILLAN ACQUIRES SCRIBNER". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-03-22.
  2. ^ Fabrikant, Geraldine (1993-11-11). "Paramount To Acquire Macmillan". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-03-22.
  3. ^ a b c "S&S Reorganizes Adult Group; Levin to Leave Free Press". PublishersWeekly.com. Retrieved 2017-01-16.
  4. ^ "Scribner | Meet the Team | From Simon & Schuster". www.simonandschusterpublishing.com. Retrieved 2017-01-16.
  5. ^ "Columbia Journalism Review - CJR's guide to what the major media companies own". Retrieved 2011-11-28.
  6. ^ Sisario, Ben. "After Consolidation at Simon & Schuster, Top Two at Free Press Are Leaving". Media Decoder Blog. Retrieved 2017-01-16.
  7. ^ "Charles Scribner" (PDF). The New York Times. August 28, 1871. Retrieved 2008-07-24. The sad news was received on Saturday evening of the death from fever on that day at Lucerne, Switzerland, of Mr. Charles Scribner, head of the eminent publishing house Charles Scribner & Company...
  8. ^ "Charles Scribner Dies suddenly at 76. Publisher Succumbs to Heart Disease at Home Here. Was at Desk Thursday. Entered Firm as Youth. Directed Business His Father Founded. Fostered Work of American Authors. Firm Founded in 1846. Received Honorary Degree". The New York Times. April 20, 1930. Retrieved 2008-07-24. Charles Scribner, chairman of the Board of Directors of the publishing house of Charles Scribner's Sons, 597 Fifth Avenue, which was founded by his father, died suddenly at 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon of heart ...
  9. ^ Pace, Eric (November 13, 1995). "Charles Scribner Jr., Who Headed Publishing Company, Dies at 74". The New York Times. Retrieved 2008-07-24. Charles Scribner Jr., the longtime head of the Charles Scribner's Sons book publishing company, died on Saturday at the Mary Manning Walsh nursing home on York Avenue in Manhattan. He was 74 and lived on the Upper East Side of Manhattan for half a century. The cause was pneumonia, and he had suffered for a decade from a degenerative neurological disorder, said his son Charles Scribner 3d.
  10. ^ Bailey, Jr., Herbert S. (1997). "Charles Scribner, Jr. (13 July 1921-11 November 1995)". Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, Vol. 141, No. 2. 141 (2): 233–237. JSTOR 987306.
  11. ^ https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/newsbrief/index.html?record=451

Further reading

  • Roger Burlingame, Of Making Many Books: A Hundred Years of Reading, Writing and Publishing, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1946; Pennsylvania State University Press, 1996 (Penn State Series in the History of the Book).

External links

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A Dictionary of Hymnology

A Dictionary of Hymnology: Origin and History of Christian Hymns and Hymnwriters of All Ages and Nations, Together with Biographical and Critical Notices of Their Authors and Translators by John D. Julian, first published in 1892, is a standard historical reference for early Christian hymns, with more than 40,000 entries.The work contains biographical and historical notes about the history of hymns and hymn writers. It is not a collection of hymn texts or hymn tunes, though brief quotations and references are included. Originally published in 1892 in London by John Murray and in New York City by Charles Scribner's Sons, it was reprinted in 1907-1908 by John Murray, in 1957 by Dover Publications (in two volumes) and in 1985 by Kregel Publications. It was not revised after 1902, but remains an important source for early Christian hymns, such as Latin ones.The new Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology, edited by J.R. Watson and Emma Hornby, was published on-line by Canterbury Press in October 2013.

Alan Villiers

Alan John Villiers (23 September 1903 – 3 March 1982) was an author, adventurer, photographer and mariner.

Born in Melbourne, Australia, Villiers first went to sea at age 15 and sailed on board traditionally rigged vessels, including the full-rigged ship Joseph Conrad. He commanded square-rigged ships for films, including Moby Dick and Billy Budd. He also commanded the Mayflower II on its voyage from the United Kingdom to the United States.Villiers wrote 44 books, and served as the Chairman (1960-70) and President (1970-74) of the Society for Nautical Research, a Trustee of the National Maritime Museum, and Governor of the Cutty Sark Preservation Society. He was awarded the British Distinguished Service Cross as a Commander in the Royal Naval Reserve during the Second World War.

Charles Scribner II

Charles Scribner II (October 18, 1854 – April 19, 1930) was the president of Charles Scribner's Sons and a trustee at Skidmore College.

Dartmouth Medal

The Dartmouth Medal of the American Library Association is awarded annually to a reference work of outstanding quality and significance, published during the previous calendar year.

Death in the Afternoon

Death in the Afternoon is a non-fiction book written by Ernest Hemingway about the ceremony and traditions of Spanish bullfighting, published in 1932. The book provides a look at the history and what Hemingway considers the magnificence of bullfighting. It also contains a deeper contemplation on the nature of fear and courage. While essentially a guide book, there are three main sections: Hemingway's work, pictures, and a glossary of terms.

Dictionary of Scientific Biography

The Dictionary of Scientific Biography is a scholarly reference work that was published from 1970 through 1980. It is supplemented by the New Dictionary of Scientific Biography. Both these publications are comprised in an electronic version, called the Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography.

Everything's Eventual

Everything's Eventual is a collection of 14 short stories by American writer Stephen King, published in 2002.

Full Dark, No Stars

Full Dark, No Stars, published in November 2010, is a collection of four novellas by American author Stephen King, all dealing with the theme of retribution. One of the novellas, 1922, is set in Hemingford Home, Nebraska, which is the home of Mother Abagail from King's epic novel The Stand (1978), the town adult Ben Hanscom moves to in It (1986), and the setting of the short story "The Last Rung on the Ladder" (1978). The collection won the 2010 Bram Stoker Award for Best Collection and was nominated for the 2011 British Fantasy Award for Best Collection. Also, 1922 was nominated for the 2011 British Fantasy Award for Best Novella.

Nixonland

Nixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America is a work of history written by Rick Perlstein, released in May 2008.

Scribner's Magazine

Scribner's Magazine was an American periodical published by the publishing house of Charles Scribner's Sons from January 1887 to May 1939. Scribner's Magazine was the second magazine out of the Scribner's firm, after the publication of Scribner's Monthly. Charles Scribner's Sons spent over $500,000 setting up the magazine, to compete with the already successful Harper's Monthly and The Atlantic Monthly. Scribner's Magazine was launched in 1887, and was the first of any magazine to introduce color illustrations. The magazine ceased publication in 1939.

The magazine contained many engravings by famous artists of the 19th and early 20th centuries, as well as many famous authors of that time, including John Thomason, Elisabeth Woodbridge Morris and Clarence Cook, as well as President Theodore Roosevelt.

The magazine had high sales when Roosevelt started contributing, reaching over 200,000, but gradually lost circulation after World War I.

The Dangerous Summer

The Dangerous Summer is a nonfiction book by Ernest Hemingway published posthumously in 1985 and written in 1959 and 1960. The book describes the rivalry between bullfighters Luis Miguel Dominguín and his brother-in-law, Antonio Ordóñez, during the "dangerous summer" of 1959. It has been cited as Hemingway's last book.

The Ice Palace

"The Ice Palace" is a modernist short story written by F. Scott Fitzgerald and published in The Saturday Evening Post, 22 May 1920. It is one of eight short stories originally published in Fitzgerald's first collection, Flappers and Philosophers (New York City: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1920), and is also included in the collection Babylon Revisited and Other Stories (New York City: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1960).

The Old Man and the Sea

The Old Man and the Sea is a short novel written by the American author Ernest Hemingway in 1951 in Cuba, and published in 1952. It was the last major work of fiction by Hemingway that was published during his lifetime. One of his most famous works, it tells the story of Santiago, an aging Cuban fisherman who struggles with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream off the coast of Cuba.In 1953, The Old Man and the Sea was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, and it was cited by the Nobel Committee as contributing to their awarding of the Nobel Prize in Literature to Hemingway in 1954.

The Shipping News

The Shipping News is a novel by American author E. Annie Proulx and published by Charles Scribner's Sons in 1993. It won the Pulitzer Prize, the U.S. National Book Award, as well as other awards. It was adapted as a film of the same name which was released in 2001.

The Snows of Kilimanjaro (short story collection)

The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories is a collection of short stories by Ernest Hemingway, published in 1961. The title story is considered by some to be the best story Hemingway ever wrote. All the stories were earlier published in The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories in 1938.

The collection includes the following stories:

"The Snows of Kilimanjaro"

"A Clean, Well-Lighted Place"

"A Day's Wait"

"The Gambler, the Nun, and the Radio"

"Fathers and Sons"

"In Another Country"

"The Killers"

"A Way You'll Never Be"

"Fifty Grand"

"The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber"

The Sundowners (novel)

The Sundowners is a 1952 novel by Australian writer Jon Cleary.

Theodore Roosevelt bibliography

This Theodore Roosevelt bibliography lists the works written by Theodore Roosevelt. Roosevelt was a diligent and skilled writer. When he lost his fortune in the Dakota Territory in 1886 and needed to make a living to support his family, he did so for the rest of his life by writing. Roosevelt wrote on a wide range of topics and genres, including history (The Naval War of 1812), autobiography, biography (Oliver Cromwell), commentary and editorials (whole series for the Kansas City Star and The Outlook), memoirs (of his experiences in Cuba leading the Rough Riders), nature (Summer Birds of the Adirondacks), and guide books (New York: Historic Towns). In addition, by one estimate Roosevelt wrote more than 150,000 letters. In his writing, Roosevelt in his style could be strong, introspective, exuberant, or angry—the subject dictated the style.

Winner Take Nothing

Winner Take Nothing is a 1933 collection of short stories by Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway's third and final collection of stories, it was published four years after A Farewell to Arms (1929), and a year after his non-fiction book about bullfighting, Death in the Afternoon (1932).

You Can't See 'Round Corners

You Can't See 'Round Corners is a 1947 novel by Australian author Jon Cleary. It was his first published novel.

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