Charles L. Grant

Charles Lewis Grant (September 12, 1942 – September 15, 2006) was an American novelist and short story writer specializing in what he called "dark fantasy" and "quiet horror." He also wrote under the pseudonyms of Geoffrey Marsh, Lionel Fenn, Simon Lake, Felicia Andrews, and Deborah Lewis.

Charles L. Grant
Charles Lewis Grant
BornSeptember 12, 1942
Newark, New Jersey
DiedSeptember 15, 2006 (aged 64)
Pen nameGeoffrey Marsh, Lionel Fenn, Simon Lake, Felicia Andrews, Deborah Lewis
OccupationNovelist
Alma materTrinity College, Hartford
GenreHorror, dark fantasy, science fiction
Notable awardsWorld Fantasy Award
Nebula Award

Biography

Early life

Charles L. Grant was born in Newark, New Jersey. He received a B.A. from Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut, in 1964 and taught for four years. Then, from 1968 to 1970, Grant served in the U.S. Army military police in Vietnam and was awarded a Bronze Star.[1]

Career

From 1973 to 1977, Grant was Secretary of Science Fiction Writers of America.[2] In 1987-1988, he served as President of the Horror Writers Association.[3]

Grant won a World Fantasy Award for his novella collection Nightmare Seasons, a Nebula Award in 1976 for his short story "A Crowd of Shadows", and another Nebula Award in 1978 for his novella A Glow of Candles, a Unicorn's Eye, the latter telling of an actor's dilemma in a post-literate future. Grant also edited the award-winning Shadows anthology, running eleven volumes from 1978-1991. Contributors include Stephen King, Ramsey Campbell, Al Sarrantonio, R.A. Lafferty, Avram Davidson, and Steve Rasnic and Melanie Tem. Grant was a former Executive Secretary and Eastern Regional Director of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America and president of the Horror Writers Association. His story "Temperature Days on Hawthorne Street" was adapted into an episode of Tales from the Darkside titled "The Milkman Cometh" in 1987.[4]

Grant wrote twelve books (eight novels and four collections of four related novellas each, with interstitial material) set in the fictional Connecticut town of Oxrun Station. Three of these were intentionally pastiches of classic Universal and Hammer horror films, and feature a vampire, a werewolf, and an animated mummy.[5]

Personal life

Grant's first wife is Debbie Voss, with whom he had two children, Ian Matthew and Emily Kathryn. Ian has two sons Payton and Logan; Emily has a son, Aaron, and a daughter, Ella. In February, 1982, Grant married writer and editor Kathryn Ptacek.[6] Also notable is Grant’s close friend and fellow writer, Thomas L. McDonald.

Death

Suffering ill health in his later years, Grant died on September 15, 2006 from a heart attack.[7]

Bibliography

Horror novels

  • Oxrun Station
  • Other
    • The Curse (1977)
    • The Nestling (1982)
    • Night Songs (1984)
    • The Tea Party (1985)
    • The Pet (1986)
    • For Fear of the Night (1988)
    • In A Dark Dream (1989)
    • Stunts (1990)
    • Fire Mask (1991) - for Young Adults
    • Something Stirs (1991)
    • Raven (1993)
    • Jackals (1994)
    • X-Files: Goblins (1994)
    • X-Files: Whirlwind (1995)
    • Millennium Quartet #1: Symphony (1997)
    • Watcher (World of Darkness) (1997)
    • Millennium Quartet #2: In The Mood (1998)
    • Black Oak: Genesis (1998)
    • Black Oak: The Hush of Dark Wings (1998)
    • Millennium Quartet #3: Chariot (1999)
    • Black Oak: Winter Knight (1999)
    • Millennium Quartet #4: Riders in the Sky (1999)

Science fiction

  • The Shadow of Alpha (1976)
  • Ascension (1977)
  • Ravens of the Moon (1978)
  • Legion (1979)
  • A Quiet Night of Fear (1981)

As "Geoffrey Marsh"

  • Lincoln Blackthorne series
    • The King of Satan's Eyes (1985)
    • The Tail of the Arabian Knight (1986)
    • The Patch of the Odin Soldier (1987)
    • The Fangs of the Hooded Demon (1988)
  • Hudson Hawk (novelization) (1991)

As "Lionel Fenn"

  • The Seven Spears of the W'dch'ck (1988)
  • The Kent Montana series
    • Kent Montana and the Really Ugly Thing From Mars (1990)
    • Kent Montana and the Reasonably Invisible Man (1991)
    • Kent Montana and the Once and Future Thing (1991)
    • Mark of the Moderately Vicious Vampire (1992)
    • 668, the Neighbor of the Beast (1992)
  • The Quest For The White Duck series
    • Blood River Down (1986)
    • Web of Defeat (1987)
    • Agnes Day (1987)
  • Diego series
    • Once Upon A Time in the East (1993)
    • By The Time I Get To Nashville (1994)
    • Time, The Semi-Final Frontier (1994)

As "Simon Lake"

  • Midnight Palace series
    • Daughter of Darkness (1992)
    • Something's Watching (1993)
    • Death Cycle (1993)
    • He Told Me To (1993)
  • The Forever House (1995)
  • Shapes (1995)
  • Death Scream (1995)
  • The Clown (1995)

As "Felicia Andrews"

  • Riverrun (1979)
  • Riverwitch (1979)
  • Mountainwitch (1980)
  • Moonwitch (1980)
  • Seacliffe (1984)
  • Silver Huntress (1984)
  • The Velvet Hart (1985)

As "Deborah Lewis"

  • Voices Out of Time (1977)
  • Eve of the Hound (1977)
  • Kirkwood Fires (1978)
  • The Wind At Winter's End (1979)

As "Steven Charles"

  • Private School series
    • Nightmare Session (1986)
    • Academy of Terror (1986)
    • Witch's Eye (1986)
    • Skeleton Key (1986)
    • The Enemy Within (1987)
    • The Last Alien (1987)

Anthologies edited

Greystone Bay series

  • The First Chronicles of Greystone Bay (1985)
  • Doom City (1987)
  • The SeaHarp Hotel (1990)
  • In the Fog (1994)

Shadows series

  • Shadows (1978)
  • Shadows 2 (1979)
  • Shadows 3 (1980)
  • Shadows 4 (1981)
  • Shadows 5 (1982)
  • Shadows 6 (1983)
  • Shadows 7 (1984)
  • Shadows 8 (1985)
  • Shadows 9 (1986)
  • Shadows 10 (1987)
  • The Best of Shadows (1988)
  • Final Shadows (1991)

Other anthologies

  • Nightmares (1979)
  • Horrors (1981)
  • Terrors (1982)
  • Gallery of Horror (1983)
  • Fears (1983)
  • Midnight (1985)
  • Night Visions 2 (1985)
  • After Midnight (1986)

Non-fiction

  • Writing and Selling Science Fiction (1976)

Collections

  • Tales from the Nightside (1981) (includes stories set in Oxrun Station)
  • A Glow of Candles and Other Stories (1981)
  • Nightmare Seasons (1982)+
  • Night Visions #1 (1984)
  • Black Wine (1986)
  • The Orchard (1986)+
  • Dialing The Wind (1989)+
  • The Black Carousel (1995)+
  • Scream Quietly: The Best of Charles L. Grant (2011) edited by Stephen Jones[8]

Notes

  • ^* Novels set in the author's fictional town of Oxrun Station
  • ^+ Linked novellas set in the author's fictional town of Oxrun Station

Short fiction

  • "The House of Evil" (1968) F&SF, Dec
  • "Afternoon of the Banjo" (1971) The Little Magazine, Spr
  • "The Summer of the Irish Sea" (1972) Orbit 11, ed. Damon Knight
  • "Come Dance with Me on My Pony’s Grave" (1973) F&SF, Jul
  • "Abdication" (1973) Amazing Stories, Oct
  • "But the Other Old Man Stopped Playing" (1973) Fantastic, Apr
  • "The Magic Child" (1973) Frontiers 2: The New Mind, ed. Roger Elwood
  • "Weep No More, Old Lady" (1973) Future Quest, ed. Roger Elwood
  • "The Key to English" (1974) F&SF, May
  • "Everybody a Winner, the Barker Cried" (1974) Orbit 13, ed. Damon Knight
  • "Temperature Days on Hawthorne Street" (1974) The Little Magazine, Spr
  • "The Rest Is Silence" (1974) F&SF, Sep
  • "White Wolf Calling" (1975) F&SF, Apr
  • "The Three of Tens" (1975) F&SF, Dec
  • "To Be a Witch, in Three-Quarter Time" (1975) Fantastic, Feb
  • "Then Two or Three Are Gathered" (1975) Amazing, Mar
  • "In Donovan’s Time" (1975) Orbit 16, ed. Damon Knight
  • "Seven is a Birdsong" (1976) Analog, Jan
  • "A Crowd of Shadows" (1976) F&SF, Jun
  • "From All the Fields of Hail and Fire" (1976) Midnight Sun #4
  • "Through All His Blood Runs Shadow" (1976) Midnight Sun #4
  • "Red River Lies Drowning" (1977) Fantastic, Feb
  • "The Shape of Plowshares" (1977) Analog, Mar
  • "Treatise on the Artifacts of a Civilization" (1977) Antæus #25
  • "When All the Children Call My Name" (1977) The Year’s Best Horror Stories: Series V, ed. Gerald W. Page
  • "The Dark of Legends, The Light of Lies" (1977) Chrysalis, ed. Roy Torgeson
  • "Eldorado" (1977) The Arts and Beyond, ed. Thomas F. Monteleone
  • "A Glow of Candles, A Unicorn’s Eye" (1977) Graven Images, ed. Edward L. Ferman & Barry N. Malzberg
  • "Gently Rapping" (1977) Galaxy, Sep
  • "Knock, and See What Enters" (1977) Fantastic, Dec
  • "Hear Me Now, My Sweet Abbey Rose" (1978) F&SF, Mar
  • "If Damon Comes" (1978) The Year’s Best Horror Stories: Series VI, ed. Gerald W. Page
  • "Caesar, Now Be Still" (1978) F&SF, Sep
  • "View, with a Difference" (1978) Dark Sins, Dark Dreams, ed. Barry N. Malzberg & Bill Pronzini
  • "The Peace That Passes Never" (1978) Chrysalis 3, ed. Roy Torgeson
  • "When Dark Descends [with Thomas F. Monteleone]" (1979) Chrysalis 4, ed. Roy Torgeson
  • "Benny, Kind and Gentle" (1979) Weirdbook #14
  • "Needle Song" (1979) Midnight Sun #5
  • "What More Remains" (1979) Midnight Sun #5
  • "The Fourth Musketeer" (1979) Whispers II, ed. Stuart David Schiff
  • "Love-Starved" (1979) F&SF, Aug
  • "And Weary of the Sun" (1979) Chrysalis 5, ed. Roy Torgeson
  • "The Last Ambition" (1979) Whispers #13-14, Oct
  • "Secrets of the Heart" (1980) F&SF, Mar
  • "A Garden of Blackred Roses" (1980) Dark Forces, ed. Kirby McCauley
  • "Across the Water to Skye" (1980) New Terrors #2, ed. Ramsey Campbell
  • "The Other Room" (1980) Mummy!, ed. Bill Pronzini
  • "In Silvered Shadows Are Born the Screams" (1980) Shayol #4
  • "Every Time You Say I Love You" (1981) F&SF, May
  • "The Residents" (1981) Fantasy Newsletter #37
  • "Silver" (1981) Twilight Zone Magazine, July
  • "Quietly Now" (1981) The Arbor House Necropolis, ed. Bill Pronzini
  • "Coin of the Realm" (1981) Tales from the Nightside, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Old Friends" (1981) Tales from the Nightside, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Home" (1981) Tales from the Nightside, by Charles L. Grant
  • "A Night of Dark Intent" (1981) Tales from the Nightside, by Charles L. Grant
  • "The Gentle Passing of a Hand" (1981) Tales from the Nightside, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Something There Is" (1981) Tales from the Nightside, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Digging" (1981) Tales from the Nightside, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Essence of Charlotte" (1982) Twilight Zone Feb 1982
  • "What in Solemn Silence" (1982) Asimov's, Mar
  • "Prologue" (1982) Nightmare Seasons, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Thou Need Not Fear My Kisses, Love" (1982) Nightmare Seasons, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Now There Comes a Darker Day" (1982) Nightmare Seasons, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Night’s Swift Dragons" (1982) Nightmare Seasons, by Charles L. Grant
  • "The Color of Joy" (1982) Nightmare Seasons, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Epilogue" (1982) Nightmare Seasons, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Pride" (1982) F&SF, May
  • "The Wind of Lost Migration" (1982) Amazing, Jun
  • "From a Single Word" (1982) Fantasy Book, Aug
  • "Confess the Seasons" (1982) Perpetual Light, ed. Alan Ryan
  • "The Next Name You Hear" (1983) F&SF, Jan
  • "Recollections of Annie" (1983) Twilight Zone, Feb
  • "I Never Could Say Goodbye" (1983) Whispers IV, ed. Stuart David Schiff
  • "When I Grow Up" (1983) Whispers #19-20, October
  • "Let No One Weep for Poor Sally Karnes" (1983) Whispers #19-20, October
  • "Are You Afraid of the Dark?" (1984) Fantasycon IX Programme
  • "A Voice Not Heard" (1984) Asimov's, Sept
  • "The Old Men Know" (1984) Masques #1, ed. J. N. Williamson
  • "The Generation Waltz" (1984) Fantasy Tales #13
  • "Friends in Dark Places" (1984) Night Visions 1, ed. Alan Ryan
  • "Family" (1984) Night Visions 1, ed. Alan Ryan
  • "What Are Deaths For 1984) Night Visions 1, ed. Alan Ryan
  • "Poor Thing" (1984) Night Visions 1, ed. Alan Ryan
  • "To Laugh with You, Dear" (1984) Night Visions 1, ed. Alan Ryan
  • "In the Blood" (1984) Night Visions 1, ed. Alan Ryan
  • "And We’ll Be Jolly Friends" (1984) Night Visions 1, ed. Alan Ryan
  • "The Card" (1984) Random Access Messages of the Computer Age, ed. Thomas F. Monteleone
  • "Myra" (1985) Fantasy Macabre #6
  • "Penny Daye" (1985) Fantasycon X Programme
  • "The Children, They Laugh So Sweetly" (1985) F&SF, Oct
  • "Prologue" (1985) Greystone Bay, ed. Charles L. Grant
  • "Andrew Patterson" (1985) Eldritch Tales #11
  • "Give Us a Big Smile" (1985) Twilight Zone, Dec
  • "The Price of a Toy" (1986) Twilight Zone, Apr
  • "Long Walk Home" (1986) Fantasy Tales #15
  • "An Image in Twisted Silver" (1986) World Fantasy Convention Program Book
  • "Crystal" (1986) F&SF, Aug
  • "Eyes" (1986) Halloween Horrors, ed. Alan Ryan
  • "Out There" (1986) Cutting Edge, ed. Dennis Etchison
  • "Prologue" (1986) The Orchard, by Charles L. Grant
  • "My Mary's Asleep" (1986) The Orchard, by Charles L. Grant
  • "I See Her Sweet and Fair" (1986) The Orchard, by Charles L. Grant
  • "The Last and Dreadful Hour" (1986) The Orchard, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Screaming, In the Dark" (1986) The Orchard, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Epilogue" (1986) The Orchard, by Charles L. Grant
  • "The Sheeted Dead" (1987) In the Field of Fire, ed. Jeanne Van Buren Dann & Jack M. Dann
  • "Listen to the Music in My Hands" (1987) Twilight Zone, Feb
  • "One Spring in Wyoming" (1987) Aboriginal SF, Feb/Mar
  • "This Old Man" (1987) Night Cry, Spring
  • "Everything to Live For" (1987) Whispers VI, ed. Stuart David Schiff
  • "Constant Father" (1987) A Southern Fantasy, ed. Ron & Val Lakey Lindahn
  • "Ellen, in Her Time" (1987) The Architecture of Fear, ed. Kathryn Cramer & Peter D. Pautz
  • "Last Night, in the Kitchen" (1988) Twilight Zone, Jun
  • "Spinning Tales with the Dead" (1988) Prime Evil, ed. Douglas E. Winter
  • "Now and Again in Summer" (1988) Fantasy Tales, v.10 #1
  • "My Shadow is the Fog" (1988) Ripper! ed. Gardner Dozois & Susan Casper
  • "City Boy" (1988) F&SF, Oct
  • "Snowman" (1988) Gaslight & Ghosts, ed. Stephen Jones & Jo Fletcher
  • "The Last Cowboy Song" (1989) Post Mortem: New Tales of Ghastly Horror, ed. Paul F. Olson & David B. Silva
  • "By the Sea" (1989) Scare Care, ed. Graham Masterton
  • "Prologue" (1989) Dialing the Wind, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Dialing the Wind" (1989) Dialing the Wind, by Charles L. Grant
  • "The Sweetest Kiss" (1989) Dialing the Wind, by Charles L. Grant
  • "As We Promise, Side by Side" (1989) Dialing the Wind, by Charles L. Grant
  • "The Chariot Dark and Low" (1989) Dialing the Wind, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Epilogue" (1989) Dialing the Wind, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Alice Smiling" (1990) Fantasy Tales v11 #4
  • "Alexandra" (1990) Borderlands, ed. Thomas F. Monteleone
  • "Pinto Rider" (1990) When the Black Lotus Blooms, ed. Elizabeth A. Saunders
  • "Kin" (1991) Psycho-Paths, ed. Robert Bloch
  • "Girl of My Dreams" (1991) Obsessions, ed. Gary Raisor
  • "Peacemaker" (1991) Borderlands 2, ed. Thomas F. Monteleone
  • "Make a Wish Upon the Moon" (1991) Dead End: City Limits, ed. Paul F. Olson & David B. Silva
  • "One Life, in an Hourglass" (1991) The Bradbury Chronicles, ed. William F. Nolan & Martin H. Greenberg
  • "The Awful Truth in Arthur's Barrow" (1992) Grails: Quests, Visitations and Other Occurrences, ed. Richard Gilliam, Martin H. Greenberg & Edward E. Kramer
  • "The Alien Visitor, Probably from Someplace Else" (1993) Tomorrow Speculative Fiction, Jan
  • "Sons" (1993) Confederacy of the Dead, ed. Richard Gilliam, Martin H. Greenberg & Edward E. Kramer
  • "In the Still, Small Hours" (1993) Deathport, ed. Ramsey Campbell
  • "Josie, In the Fog" (1993) In the Fog, ed. Charles L. Grant
  • "The Dead Speaketh Not, They Just Grunt Now and Then" (1993) The Ultimate Zombie ed. John Betancourt & Byron Preiss
  • "Name That Tune" (1993) Monsters in Our Midst, ed. Robert Bloch
  • "Holding Hands" (1993) Touch Wood, ed. Peter Crowther
  • "The Mask of Truth Has Many Holes" (1993) Cemetery Dance #15, Winter
  • "After You’ve Gone" (1994) Phobias, ed. Wendy Webb, Richard Gilliam, Edward E. Kramer & Martin H. Greenberg
  • "Sometimes, in the Rain" (1994) Northern Frights 2, ed. Don Hutchison
  • "Always, in the Dark" (1994) Return to the Twilight Zone, ed. Carol Serling & Martin H. Greenberg
  • "Prologue" (1995) The Black Carousel, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Penny Tunes for a Gold Lion" (1995) The Black Carousel, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Will You Be Mine?" (1995) The Black Carousel, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Lost in Amber Light" (1995) The Black Carousel, by Charles L. Grant
  • "The Rain is Filled with Ghosts Tonight" (1995) The Black Carousel, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Epilogue" (1995) The Black Carousel, by Charles L. Grant
  • "Gray" (1995) Dark Destiny: Proprietors of Fate, ed. Edward E. Kramer
  • "Riding the Black" (1997) Revelations, ed. Douglas E. Winter
  • "Haunted" (1997) Psychos, ed. Robert Bloch
  • "The Soft Sound of Wings" (1998) In the Shadow of the Gargoyle, ed. Nancy Kilpatrick & Thomas S. Roche
  • "Cody" (1999) Horror at Halloween, ed. Stephen Jones & Jo Fletcher
  • "Whose Ghosts These Are" (2001) The Museum of Horror, ed. Dennis Etchison
  • "For My Birthday, Another Candle" (2003) 13 Horrors, ed. Brian A. Hopkins
  • "Brownie and Me" (2003) The Dark: New Ghost Stories, ed. Ellen Datlow
  • "Friday Night at the Wicked Swan" (2005) Taverns of the Dead, ed. Kealan Patrick Burke

References

  1. ^ "News: C. Grant". Science Fiction Writers Association. 2006. Archived from the original on 2008-11-20.
  2. ^ "News: C. Grant". Science Fiction Writers Association. 2006. Archived from the original on 2008-11-20.
  3. ^ "News: C. Grant". Horror Writers Association. 2015.
  4. ^ Muir, John Kenneth (2008). Terror Television: American Series, 1970-1999. McFarland. p. 125. ISBN 978-0786438846.
  5. ^ Errickson, Will (2014-07-11). "Summer of Sleaze: The Universal Horrors of Charles L. Grant". Tor Books. Retrieved 2017-10-14.
  6. ^ "News: C. Grant". Science Fiction Writers Association. 2006. Archived from the original on 2008-11-20.
  7. ^ "News: C. Grant". Science Fiction Writers Association. 2006. Archived from the original on 2008-11-20.
  8. ^ http://www.stephenjoneseditor.com/forthcoming02.htm
  • Keith Neilson, “The Oxrun Station Series” in “Survey of Modern Fantasy Literature”, vol.3, edited by Frank N. Magill, Salem Press, 1983
  • Douglas E. Winter, “Interview: Charles L. Grant” in “Fantasy Newsletter” January 1982
  • Douglas E. Winter, ”Charles L. Grant” in “Faces of Fear”, Berekely Books, 1985
  • Douglas E. Winter, “A Conversation with Charles L. Grant” in “Twilight Zone, April 1987
  • Don D’Ammassa, “The Subtle Terrors of Charles L. Grant” in “Discovering Modern Horror Fiction II”, edited by Darrell Schweitzer, Starmont House, 1988
  • Interview in “Speaking of Horror”, by Darrell Schweitzer, 1994
  • Stanley Wiater, interview in “Dark Dreamers: Conversation with Masters of Horror”, Avon, 1990
  • Clute, John; John Grant (1997). The Encyclopedia of Fantasy. New York: St. Martin's Press. pp. 428–429. ISBN 0-88184-708-9.
  • Quietly Now: A tribute anthology for Charles L. Grant, ed. Kealan Patrick Burke, Borderlands Press, 2004 (includes interview, and bibliography)

External links

See also

Al Sarrantonio

Al Sarrantonio (born May 25, 1952) is an American horror and science fiction writer, editor and publisher who has authored more than 50 books and 90 short stories. He has also edited numerous anthologies and has been called "brilliant" and "a master anthologist" by Booklist.

Bestsellers Guaranteed

Bestsellers Guaranteed was a collection of short fiction by Joe R. Lansdale, published in May 1993.It contains:

"Bestsellers Guaranteed" (originally published in Espionage Magazine, May 1985)

"Bob the Dinosaur Goes to Disneyland" (originally published in Midnight Graffiti, Fall 1989)

"By the Hair of the Head" (originally published in Shadows #6, ed. Charles L. Grant (1983))

"Chompers" (originally published in Twilight Zone Magazine, July 1982)

"Dog, Cat, and Baby" (originally published in Masques #2, ed. J. N. Williamson (1987))

"The Dump" (originally published in Twilight Zone Magazine, July 1981)

"The Events Concerning a Nude Fold-Out Found in a Harlequin Romance" (winner of Bram Stoker Award) (originally published in Dark at Heart, ed. Joe & Karen Lansdale (1992))

"The Fat Man" (originally published in The Horror Show, Jan 1987)

"God of the Razor" (heavily reworked excerpt of The Nightrunners) (originally published in Grue #5, 1987)

"The Job" (originally published in Razored Saddles, ed. Joe R. Lansdale & Pat LoBrutto (1989))

"My Dead Dog Bobby" (originally published in The Horror Show, Summer 1987)

"Not From Detroit" (originally published in Midnight Graffiti, Fall 1988)

"On a Dark October" (originally published in The Horror Show, Spring 1984)

"Pentecostal Punk Rock" (originally published in Deathrealm, Summer 1989)

"The Shaggy House" (originally published in The Horror Show, Fall 1986)

"The White Rabbit" (originally published in The Arbor House Necropolis, ed. Bill Pronzini (1981))All of the stories (except for "Events Concerning ...") in this collection were printed the previous year in Stories by Mama Lansdale's Youngest Boy, but this collection had a larger print run. These collections are the only collections which include "Pentecostal Punk Rock", and "The White Rabbit" has only subsequently been printed in the extremely limited edition A Little Green Book of Monster Stories.

Charles Grant

Charles Grant may refer to:

Charles Grant (American football) (born 1978), American football player

Charles Grant (Australian politician) (1878–1943), Australian Senator

Charles Grant (British East India Company) (1746–1823), British politician

Charles Grant (game designer) (died 1979), Scottish game author

Charles Grant (actor) (born 1957), American actor

Charles Grant, 1st Baron Glenelg (1778–1866), Scottish politician

Charles Henry Grant (1831–1901), engineer and politician in colonial Tasmania (Australia)

Charles L. Grant (1942–2006), American novelist

Charles James William Grant (1861–1932), Scottish recipient of the Victoria Cross

Charlie Grant (1874–1932), American baseball player, also known as Charlie Tokohama

Charles Grant (British Army officer) (1877–1950), British Army General

Charles Grant (Royal Navy officer) (1770–1824), Royal Navy Commodore

Charles Grant (bishop) (1906–1989), English prelate of the Roman Catholic Church

Charles Jameson Grant, American editorial cartoonist

Charlie Grant (activist) (1902–1980), Canadian human rights activist

Charles William Grant, 5th Baron de Longueuil (1782–1848)

Charles Colmore Grant, 7th Baron de Longueuil (1844–1898)

Charles Grant (1810 EIC ship), built at Bombay for the British East India Company

Cherie Wilkerson

Cherie Dee Wilkerson is a writer best known for her work on animated television series such as Batman: The Animated Series, DuckTales, The Transformers and the 1988 version of Superman, amongst others. Her TV writing career lasted from 1984 through 1992.

She also has published several short stories in the genres of horror and fantasy, beginning with an appearance in the 1981 anthology Shadows 4, edited by Charles L. Grant. She served as a co-editor for the 1995 non-fiction book The Big Elfquest Gatherum. Since 1996, she has worked as a freelance copy editor.

Dark fantasy

Dark fantasy is a subgenre of fantasy literary, artistic, and cinematic works that incorporate darker and frightening themes of fantasy. It also often combines fantasy with elements of horror or has a gloomy, dark (or grimdark) atmosphere, or a sense of horror and dread.A strict definition for dark fantasy is difficult to pin down. Gertrude Barrows Bennett has been called "the woman who invented dark fantasy". Both Charles L. Grant and Karl Edward Wagner are credited with having coined the term "dark fantasy"—although both authors were describing different styles of fiction. Brian Stableford argues "dark fantasy" can be usefully defined as subgenre of stories that attempt to "incorporate elements of horror fiction" into the standard formulae of fantasy stories. Stableford also suggests that supernatural horror set primarily in the real world is a form of "contemporary fantasy", whereas supernatural horror set partly or wholly in "secondary worlds" should be described as "dark fantasy".Additionally, other authors, critics, and publishers have adopted dark fantasy to describe various other works. However, these stories rarely share universal similarities beyond supernatural occurrences and a dark, often brooding, tone. As a result, dark fantasy cannot be solidly connected to a defining set of tropes. The term itself may refer collectively to tales that are either horror-based or fantasy-based.

Some writers also use "dark fantasy" (or "Gothic fantasy") as an alternative description to "horror", because they feel the latter term is too lurid or vivid.

Kealan Patrick Burke

Kealan Patrick Burke (born in Dungarvan, Ireland) is an author. Some of his works include the novels Kin, Currency of Souls, Master of the Moors, and The Hides (Bram Stoker Award nominee), the novellas The Turtle Boy (Bram Stoker Award Winner, 2004) and Vessels, and the collections Ravenous Ghosts, The Number 121 to Pennsylvania & Others, Theater Macabre and The Novellas. He has also appeared in a number of publications, including Postscripts, Cemetery Dance, Grave Tales, Shivers II, Shivers III, Shivers IV, Looking Glass, Masques V, Subterranean #1, Evermore, Inhuman, Horror World, Surreal Magazine, and Corpse Blossoms. Burke also edited the anthologies: Taverns of the Dead (recipient of a starred review in Publishers Weekly), Brimstone Turnpike, Quietly Now: A Tribute to Charles L. Grant (International Horror Guild Award Nominee, 2004), the charity anthology Tales from the Gorezone and Night Visions 12.

An 8-minute short film based on his short story "Peekers" was written by author Rick Hautala, and was directed by Mark Steensland. A feature film adaptation is currently in development from Lionsgate Entertainment, written by Mike Flanagan and Jeff Howard ("Oculus", "Soma") and produced by Lawrence Grey.

In 2009 Burke played the lead in the Independent film "Slime City Massacre", alongside Debbie Rochon. Burke won Best Actor at the 2010 PollyGrind Film Festival with his portrayal of Cory.

Leanne Frahm

Leanne Frahm is an Australian writer of speculative short fiction.

Simon Lake

For the writer Simon Lake, see the pseudonym of Charles L. Grant.Simon Lake (September 4, 1866 – June 23, 1945) was a Quaker American mechanical engineer and naval architect who obtained over two hundred patents for advances in naval design and competed with John Philip Holland to build the first submarines for the United States Navy.

Splatterpunk

Splatterpunk was a movement within horror fiction in the 1980s, distinguished by its graphic, often gory, depiction of violence, countercultural alignment and "hyperintensive horror with no limits." The term was coined in 1986 by David J. Schow at the Twelfth World Fantasy Convention in Providence, Rhode Island. Splatterpunk is regarded as a revolt against the "traditional, meekly suggestive horror story".

Splatterpunk has been defined as a "literary genre characterised by graphically described scenes of an extremely gory nature."Michael Shea's short fiction "The Autopsy" (1980) has been described as a "proto-splatterpunk" story.Splatterpunk provoked considerable controversy among horror writers. Robert Bloch criticised the movement, stating "there is a distinction to be made between that which inspires terror and that which inspires nausea". William F. Nolan and Charles L. Grant also censured the movement. However, critics R.S. Hadji and Philip Nutman praised the movement, the latter stating splatterpunk was a "survivalist" literature that "reflects the moral chaos of our times".Though the term gained some prominence in the 1980s and 1990s, and, as a movement, attracted a cult following, the term "splatterpunk" has since been replaced by other synonymous terms for the genre. The last major commercial endeavor aimed at the Splatterpunk audience was 1995's Splatterpunks II: Over the Edge, an anthology of short stories which also included essays on horror cinema and an interview with Anton LaVey. By 1998, one commentator was stating that interest in splatterpunk was declining, noting such interest "seemed to have reached a peak" in the mid-1990s. The term is still sometimes used for horror with a strong gruesome element, such as Philip Nutman's novel Cities of Night.Writers known for writing in this genre include Clive Barker, Poppy Z. Brite, Jack Ketchum, Richard Laymon, J. F. Gonzalez, Joe Lansdale, Brian Keene, Monica J. O'Rourke, Matt Shaw, Bryan Smith, Richard Christian Matheson, Robert McCammon, Shane McKenzie, Wrath James White, David J. Schow

(described as "the father of splatterpunk" by Richard Christian Matheson), John Skipp, Craig Spector, Edward Lee, and Michael Boatman. Some commentators also

regard Kathe Koja as a splatterpunk writer.

Stephen Jones (author)

Stephen Jones (born 4 November 1953 in Pimlico, London) is an English editor of horror anthologies, and the author of several book-length studies of horror and fantasy films as well as an account of H. P. Lovecraft's early British publications.

Jones and Kim Newman have edited several books together, including Horror: 100 Best Books, the 1988 horror volume in Xanadu's 100 Best series, and Horror: Another 100 Best Books, a 2005 sequel from Carroll & Graf (US publisher of the earlier series). Each comprises 100 essays by 100 horror writers about 100 horror books and each was recognised by the Horror Writers of America with its annual Bram Stoker Award for Best Non-Fiction.Jones has edited anthologies such as the Best New Horror series, Dark Terrors, The Mammoth Book of Vampires, The Mammoth Book of Zombies, The Mammoth Book of Dracula, The Mammoth Book of Frankenstein, The Mammoth Book of Vampire Stories by Women, The Vampire Stories of R. Chetwynd-Hayes, The Conan Chronicles, 1 and The Conan Chronicles, 2 by Robert E. Howard, and Scream Quietly: The Best of Charles L. Grant. Jones also edited Dancing with the Dark, a collection of stories of allegedly real life encounters with the paranormal by established horror writers.

Jones has been the recipient of a Hugo award and many Bram Stoker Awards. His Mammoth book Best New Horror (1990, with Ramsey Campbell) was a World Fantasy Award winner. Volume 22 of the annual anthology was published in 2011.

Stories by Mama Lansdale's Youngest Boy

Stories by Mama Lansdale's Youngest Boy is an early compilation of short work by Joe R. Lansdale, published in 1991. It was initially published as issue number 18 of Author's Choice Monthly.It contains:

Bestsellers Guaranteed (originally published in Espionage Magazine, May 1985)

Bob the Dinosaur Goes to Disneyland (originally published in Midnight Graffiti, Fall 1989)

By the Hair of the Head (originally published in Shadows #6, ed. Charles L. Grant, 1983)

Chompers (originally published in Twilight Zone, July 1982)

Dog, Cat, and Baby (originally published in Masques #2, ed. J. N. Williamson, 1987)

The Dump (originally published in Twilight Zone, Jul 1981)

The Fat Man (originally published in The Horror Show, Jan 1987)

God of the Razor (heavily reworked excerpt of The Nightrunners) (originally published in Grue #5, 1987)

The Job (originally published in Razored Saddles, ed. Joe R. Lansdale & Pat LoBrutto, 1989)

My Dead Dog Bobby (originally published in The Horror Show, Summer 1987)

Not From Detroit (originally published in Midnight Graffiti',' Fall 1988)

On a Dark October (originally published in The Horror Show, Spring 1984)

Pentecostal Punk Rock (originally published in Deathrealm, Summer 1989)

The Shaggy House (originally published in The Horror Show, Fall 1986)

The White Rabbit {originally published in The Arbor House Necropolis, ed. Bill Pronzini, 1981)

All of the stories in this collection were reprinted the next year in Bestsellers Guaranteed (with one addition), although these collections are the only collections which include Pentecostal Punk Rock and The White Rabbit.

Survivor Type

"Survivor Type" is a short story by Stephen King, first published in the 1982 horror anthology Terrors, edited by Charles L. Grant, and collected in King's 1985 collection Skeleton Crew. Of "Survivor Type", King says: "As far as short stories are concerned, I like the grisly ones the best. However, the story "Survivor Type" goes a little bit too far, even for me."

The Belonging Kind

"The Belonging Kind" is a science fiction short story; a collaboration between noted cyberpunk authors William Gibson and John Shirley. It was first published in the horror anthology Shadows 4 edited by Charles L. Grant in 1981, later to be included along with several other stories in Gibson's collection Burning Chrome.

It is a departure from the Sprawl universe in which several of Gibson's novels and stories are set, taking place in a setting much more like contemporary American life.

The Man Who Would Not Shake Hands

"The Man Who Would Not Shake Hands" is a short story by American writer Stephen King, first published in the 1982 horror anthology Shadows 4, edited by Charles L. Grant. It was collected in Skeleton Crew in 1985.

Like the novella "The Breathing Method" from King's collection Different Seasons, the story takes the form of a nested narrative told in a strange 'club' in Manhattan.

The X-Files literature

During the run of the TV series The X-Files, many books based on it were released, written, including novels based on episodes, a series of comic books from Topps Comics, and many "official" and "unauthorized" non-fiction books.

Some of the novels, which were published in both hardcover and trade paperback editions, came out as audiobooks read by several of the series' stars, including Gillian Anderson (Ground Zero), John Neville (Fight the Future), Steven Williams (Squeeze), Bruce Harwood (Skin) and Mitch Pileggi (Antibodies and Ruins).

Apart from the novels, in 2016 first official The X-Files coloring book was released by IDW Publishing.

The Year's Best Horror Stories

The Year’s Best Horror Stories was a series of annual anthologies published by DAW Books in the U.S.from 1972 to 1994 under the successive editorships of Richard Davis from 1972 to 1975 (after a 1971-1973 series published by Sphere Books in the U.K.; the first volumes had the same contents, the U.S. second volume in 1974 drew stories from the second and third U.K. volumes, and the 1975 U.S. third volume was very different from the U.K's.; the U.S. third volume was published as a one-shot volume in the U.K. by Orbit Books in 1976), and of Gerald W. Page from 1976 to 1979, and Karl Edward Wagner from 1980 to 1994. The series was discontinued after Wagner's death. It was a companion to DAW’s The Annual World’s Best SF and The Year's Best Fantasy Stories, which performed a similar function for the science fiction and fantasy fields.

Each annual volume reprinted what in the opinion of the editor was the best horror short fiction appearing in the previous year. The series also aimed to discover and nurture new talent. It featured both occasionally recurring authors and writers new to the horror genre. Veterans among the contributing authors included Brian Lumley, Eddy C. Bertin, Kit Reed, R. Chetwynd-Hayes, Ramsey Campbell, Dennis Etchison, Richard Matheson, Robert Bloch, and Tanith Lee; some of the relative newcomers to the field featured were Stephen King, Al Sarrantonio, Lisa Tuttle, Jessica Amanda Salmonson, David Drake, Juleen Brantingham, and Nina Kiriki Hoffman.

World Fantasy Award—Collection

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction published in English during the previous calendar year. The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Collection is given each year for collections of fantasy stories by a single author published in English. A collection can have any number of editors, and works in the collection may have been previously published; awards are also given out for anthologies of works by multiple authors in the Anthology category. The Collection category has been awarded annually since 1975, though from 1977 through 1987 anthologies were admissible as nominees. Anthologies were split into a separate category beginning in 1988; during the 10 years they were admissible they won the award 7 times and were 38 of the 56 nominations.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 152 writers have had works nominated; 41 of them have won, including ties and co-authors. Only six writers or editors have won more than once. Jeffrey Ford has won the regular collection award three times out of four nominations, while Karen Joy Fowler, Lucius Shepard, and Gene Wolfe won the regular collection award twice, out of two, four, and two nominations, respectively. Charles L. Grant and Kirby McCauley won the award as editors of anthologies while those were eligible; Grant was nominated nine times as an editor and once for a collection, while McCauley won both times he was nominated for anthologies. Grant's ten nominations are the most of any writer or editor, followed by Ramsey Campbell, Harlan Ellison, and Charles de Lint at five, with two of Campbell's nominations coming for anthologies. Dennis Etchison, Stephen King, Fritz Leiber, Kelly Link, and Stuart David Schiff have had the most nominations without winning at four; one of Etchison's and all of Schiff's nominations were for anthologies.

World Fantasy Award—Novel

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction published in English during the previous calendar year. The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize", and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction). The World Fantasy Award—Novel is given each year for fantasy novels published in English or translated into English. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as a novel if it is 40,000 words or longer; awards are also given out for pieces of shorter lengths in the Short Fiction and Long Fiction categories. The Novel category has been awarded annually since 1975.World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges at the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner. The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties. The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October. Winners were presented with a statue in the form of a bust of H. P. Lovecraft through the 2015 awards; more recent winners receive a statuette of a tree.During the 44 nomination years, 154 authors have had works nominated; 45 of them have won, including ties. Five authors have won twice: Gene Wolfe, out of eight nominations; Tim Powers, out of five; Patricia McKillip, out of four; Jeffrey Ford, out of three; and James K. Morrow for both of his nominations. Wolfe has the most nominations for an author who has won at least once, while Stephen King has the most nominations without winning, at nine, followed by Charles L. Grant at six and Jonathan Carroll at five.

World Fantasy Convention

The World Fantasy Convention is an annual convention of professionals, collectors, and others interested in the field of fantasy. The World Fantasy Awards are presented at the event. Other features include an art show, a dealer's room, and an autograph reception.The convention was conceived and begun by T. E. D. Klein, Kirby McCauley and several others.

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