Charles J. Folger

Charles James Folger (April 16, 1818 – September 4, 1884) was an American lawyer and politician. He served as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury from 1881 until his death.

Charles Folger
Charles j folger cropped 2
34th United States Secretary of the Treasury
In office
November 14, 1881 – September 4, 1884
PresidentChester A. Arthur
Preceded byWilliam Windom
Succeeded byWalter Q. Gresham
Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals
In office
May 20, 1880 – November 14, 1881
Preceded bySanford E. Church
Succeeded byCharles Andrews
Member of the New York Senate
from the 26th district
In office
January 1, 1862 – December 31, 1869
Preceded byThomas Hillhouse
Succeeded byAbraham V. Harpending
Personal details
BornApril 16, 1818
Nantucket, Massachusetts, U.S.
DiedSeptember 4, 1884 (aged 66)
Geneva, New York, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Susan Worth
EducationHobart College (BA)

Early life

Born in 1818 on the island of Nantucket, when Folger was 12 years old his family moved to Geneva, New York. He later attended Hobart College, where in 1836 he graduated with honors. After his graduation, he studied law with Mark H. Sibley and Alvah Worden in Canandaigua, N.Y. and was admitted to the bar three years later in 1839. He began his practice in Lyons, N.Y., but returned to Geneva in 1840, where he remained for the rest of his life. On June 18, 1844, he married Susan Rebecca Worth.

Public life

FOLGER, Charles J-Treasury (BEP engraved portrait)
Bureau of Engraving and Printing portrait of Folger as Secretary of the Treasury.

In 1844, Folger was appointed to the bench of the Ontario County Court of Common Pleas, serving for about a year.

He was a Republican member of the New York State Senate (26th D.) from 1862 to 1869, sitting in the 85th, 86th, 87th, 88th, 89th, 90th, 91st and 92nd New York State Legislatures. During his term he served as President pro tempore for four years and as Chairman of the Judiciary Committee. Folger served as a delegate to the New York State Constitutional Convention of 1867–68 and to the 1868 Republican National Convention.

Folger resigned from the State Senate in 1869, having been appointed by President Ulysses S. Grant to Assistant United States Treasurer in New York City. The following year, Folger was elected one of the first judges of the re-organized New York Court of Appeals. After the death of Sanford E. Church, Folger was appointed Chief Judge by Governor Alonzo B. Cornell on May 20, 1880, to fill the vacancy temporarily. In November he was elected to a full 14-year term as Chief Judge.

In 1881, President James Garfield offered Folger the position of Attorney General, which he declined. Later that year, he resigned from the bench to accept an appointment by President Chester Arthur to serve as Secretary of the Treasury. In 1883 he appointed Mifflin E. Bell to the Office of the Supervising Architect.

Gubernatorial Race

As U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, he ran in 1882 for Governor of New York, but was defeated by Democrat Grover Cleveland.

Death

Folger died on September 4, 1884, at his home on Main Street in Geneva, NY. He was buried at Glenwood Cemetery, Geneva, at the side of his wife who had died seven years earlier.

The Geneva Fire Department's C.J. Folger Hook & Ladder Co. #1 is named in his honor, as is Folger Park in Washington, D.C. In 1879 and 1880, a company of the New York National Guard was organized in Geneva and named the Folger Independent Corps in honor of Folger. The unit became the 34th Independent Company and served during the Spanish–American War as Company B, 3rd New York Infantry Regiment. The unit currently exists as Co. D, 2nd Battalion, 108th Infantry Regiment, based in Ithaca.

References

New York State Senate
Preceded by
Thomas Hillhouse
Member of the New York Senate
from the 26th district

1862–1869
Succeeded by
Abraham V. Harpending
Legal offices
Preceded by
Sanford E. Church
Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals
1880–1881
Succeeded by
Charles Andrews
Political offices
Preceded by
William Windom
United States Secretary of the Treasury
1881–1884
Succeeded by
Walter Q. Gresham
Party political offices
Preceded by
Alonzo B. Cornell
Republican nominee for Governor of New York
1882
Succeeded by
Ira Davenport
1865 New York state election

The 1865 New York state election was held on November 7, 1865, to elect the Secretary of State, the State Comptroller, the Attorney General, the State Treasurer, the State Engineer, two Judges of the New York Court of Appeals, a Canal Commissioners, an Inspector of State Prisons and the Clerk of the Court of Appeals, as well as all members of the New York State Assembly and the New York State Senate.

1867 United States Senate election in New York

The 1867 United States Senate election in New York was held on January 15, 1867, by the New York State Legislature to elect a U.S. Senator (Class 3) to represent the State of New York in the United States Senate.

1870 New York special judicial election

A special judicial election was held on May 17, 1870, to fill the seats on the re-organized New York Court of Appeals.

1880 New York state election

The 1880 New York state election was held on November 2, 1880, to elect the Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals, as well as all members of the New York State Assembly.

1881 New York state election

The 1881 New York state election was held on November 8, 1881, to elect the Secretary of State, the State Comptroller, the Attorney General, the State Treasurer, the State Engineer and a judge of the New York Court of Appeals, as well as all members of the New York State Assembly and the New York State Senate.

1881 United States Senate special elections in New York

The 1881 United States Senate special election in New York was held from May 31 to July 22, 1881, by the New York State Legislature to elect two U.S. Senators (Class 1 and Class 3) to represent the State of New York in the United States Senate.

1882 New York state election

The 1882 New York state election was held on November 7, 1882, to elect the Governor, the Lieutenant Governor, the Chief Judge and a U.S. Representative-at-large, as well as all members of the New York State Assembly. Besides, two constitutional amendments were proposed - the abolition of tolls on the State canals, and to increase the number of justices on the New York Supreme Court - and were accepted by the electorate.

88th New York State Legislature

The 88th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 3 to April 28, 1865, during the first year of Reuben E. Fenton's governorship, in Albany.

89th New York State Legislature

The 89th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 2 to April 20, 1866, during the second year of Reuben E. Fenton's governorship, in Albany.

90th New York State Legislature

The 90th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 1 to April 20, 1867, during the third year of Reuben E. Fenton's governorship, in Albany.

91st New York State Legislature

The 91st New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 7 to May 6, 1868, during the fourth year of Reuben E. Fenton's governorship, in Albany.

92nd New York State Legislature

The 92nd New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 5 to May 11, 1869, during the first year of John T. Hoffman's governorship, in Albany.

Abraham V. Harpending

Abraham V. Harpending (July 9, 1816 – April 23, 1871) was an American lawyer and politician from New York.

Capitol Hill Parks

Capitol Hill Parks is an umbrella term for the National Park Service management of a variety of urban parks in Washington, D.C.

There are four key parks in the system:

Folger Park, named after former Secretary of the Treasury Charles J. Folger;

Lincoln Park, named after the sixteenth president, and by far the largest unit at 7 acres (28,000 m2);

Marion Park, named after Revolutionary War leader Francis Marion;

Stanton Park, named for Lincoln's Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton.Additionally, a variety of smaller greenspaces are under the authority of this NPS area. The 59 circles and triangles included in Pierre L'Enfant's design of the city are overseen as part of this jurisdiction. Some of these include:,

Eastern Market Metro Station, approximate square of land formed by the Intersection of Pennsylvania and South Carolina Avenues, SE; D, 7th, and 9th Streets, SE; only the Pennsylvania Avenue median remains in NPS hands as the remainder was transferred to DC;

Maryland Avenue Triangles;

Pennsylvania Avenue Medians;

Potomac Avenue Metro Station, around the intersection of Potomac and Pennsylvania Avenues, SE;

Seward Square, named after William Henry Seward, the United States Secretary of State under Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson;

Twining Square, around the intersection of Pennsylvania and Minnesota Avenues, SE.

Charles Andrews (judge)

Charles Andrews (May 27, 1827 New York Mills, Oneida County, New York – October 22, 1918 Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York) was an American Lawyer and politician. He was Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals from 1881 to 1882 and from 1892 to 1897.

Folger

Folger is an English and German surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Abiah Folger (1667–1752), mother of Benjamin Franklin

Abigail Folger (1943–1969), American civil rights activist

Alonzo Dillard Folger (1888–1941), American politician

Charles J. Folger (1818–1884), American politician

Dan Folger (1943–2006), American singer and songwriter

Emily Jordan Folger (1858–1936), Shakespeare scholar

Henry Clay Folger (1857–1930), founder of the Folger Shakespeare Library

J. A. Folger (1835–1889), founder of the Folgers Coffee Company

John Clifford Folger (1893–1981), United States Ambassador to Belgium (1957-59)

John Hamlin Folger (1880–1963), American politician and lawyer, United States Secretary of the Treasury

Jonas Folger (born 1993), German motorbike racer

Joseph P. Folger (21st century), American professor of communication

Mary Morrell Folger, grandmother of Benjamin Franklin, referenced in Moby Dick

Mayhew Folger (1774–1828), American whaler and grandfather of William M. Folger

Peter Folger (1905–1980), American businessperson

Peter Folger (Nantucket settler) (1617–1690), Baptist missionary, teacher, and surveyor, grandfather of Benjamin Franklin

Walter Folger Jr. (1765–1849), American politician

William M. Folger (1844–1928), United States Navy rear admiral and grandson of Mayhew Folger

Folger Park

Folger Park is a public park named after former Secretary of the Treasury Charles J. Folger. It is located at 2nd Street and D Street, Southeast, Washington, D.C., in the Capitol Hill neighborhood.

Andrew Ellicott modified Pierre L'Enfant's plan making what was street right of way into open space. Today the park is notable for two large pebble-faced concrete "fountain benches" (no longer containing drinking fountains) that sit on opposite sides of the park, facing each other. The park also contains a variety of trees, including ornamentals. Tree species include the copper beech, southern magnolia, yellowwood, hackberry, eastern redbud, deodar cedar, and American holly.

Thomas Hillhouse (adjutant general)

Thomas Hillhouse (March 10, 1817 – July 31, 1897) was an American farmer, banker and politician.

William Windom

William Windom (May 10, 1827 – January 29, 1891) was an American politician from Minnesota. He served as U.S. Representative from 1859 to 1869, and as U.S. Senator from 1870 to January 1871, from March 1871 to March 1881, and from November 1881 to 1883. He also served as Secretary of the Treasury from March to November 1881, and from 1889 to 1891. He was a Republican. He was the great-grandfather of actor William Windom, who was named for him.

18th century
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Secretary of the Treasury
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