Charles H. Grosvenor

Charles Henry Grosvenor (September 20, 1833 – October 30, 1917) was a multiple-term U.S. Representative from Ohio, as well as a brigade commander in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Charles Henry Grosvenor
Charles H. Grosvenor 1897
Grosvenor in 1897
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 14th district
In office
March 4, 1885 – March 3, 1887
Preceded byGeorge W. Geddes
Succeeded byCharles Preston Wickham
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 15th district
In office
March 4, 1887 – March 3, 1891
Preceded byBeriah Wilkins
Succeeded byMichael D. Harter
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 11th district
In office
March 4, 1893 – March 3, 1907
Preceded byJohn M. Pattison
Succeeded byAlbert Douglas
Member of the Ohio House of Representatives
from the Athens district
In office
January 5, 1874 – January 6, 1878
Preceded byNelson H. Van Vorhes
Succeeded byCharles Townsend
Personal details
BornSeptember 20, 1833
Pomfret, Connecticut
DiedOctober 30, 1917 (aged 84)
Athens, Ohio
Resting placeWest Union Street Cemetery, Athens, Ohio
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Samantha Stewart
Louise A. Currier
Childrenthree
Signature
Charles H. Grosvenor's signature
Military service
AllegianceUnited States of America
Union
Service/branchUnited States Army
Union Army
RankUnion Army colonel rank insignia.png Colonel
Union army brig gen rank insignia.jpg brevet brigadier general
Unit18th Ohio Infantry
Battles/warsAmerican Civil War

Biography

Grosvernor was born in Pomfret, Connecticut. He was the uncle of Charles Grosvenor Bond. In 1838, Grosvenor moved with his parents to southeastern Ohio, where he attended school in Athens County. He later taught school before studying law. He was admitted to the bar in 1857 and practiced in Athens.

During the Civil War, Grosvenor served in the 18th Ohio Infantry and was promoted through the ranks to colonel. He led his regiment at the Battle of Chickamauga in 1863, and was a brigade commander in the division of Charles Cruft at the Battle of Nashville in December 1864. At the close of the war, Grosvenor was brevetted as a colonel in the Regular Army. He was mustered out of the volunteers on October 9, 1865.[1] On January 13, 1866, President Andrew Johnson nominated Grosvenor for appointment to the grade of brevet brigadier general of volunteers, to rank from March 13, 1865, and the United States Senate confirmed the appointment on March 12, 1866.[2]

Following the war, Grosvenor held diverse township and village offices. He served as member of the State house of representatives from 1874–1878 and served as Speaker of the House for two years. He served as member of the board of trustees of the Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home in Xenia from April 1880 until 1888, and president of the board for five years.

Presidential elector for Grant/Wilson in 1872.[3] Presidential elector for Garfield/Arthur in 1880.[4]

He served as delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1896 and 1900. Grosvenor was elected as a Republican to the Forty-ninth, Fiftieth, and Fifty-first Congresses (March 4, 1885 – March 3, 1891). He was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1890.

Grosvenor was elected to the Fifty-third and to the six succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1893 – March 3, 1907). He served as chairman of the Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Treasury (Fifty-fourth Congress), Committee on Mines and Mining (Fifty-fifth Congress), Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries (Fifty-sixth through Fifty-ninth Congresses). He was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1906.

He resumed the practice of law in Athens. The combat veteran was appointed as chairman of the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Park Commission and served from 1910 until his death in Athens on October 30, 1917. He was interred in Union Street Cemetery.

Grosvenor married Samantha Stewart of Athens County, December 1, 1858. She died in 1866, leaving a daughter. He married Louise A. Currier, also of Athens County, May 21, 1867. She had two daughters.[5]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Eicher, John H.; Eicher, David J. (2001). Civil War High Commands. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. p. 270. ISBN 978-0-8047-3641-1.
  2. ^ Eicher, 2001, p. 747.
  3. ^ Smith 1898 : 307
  4. ^ Smith 1898 : 431-432
  5. ^ Randall, Emilius; Ryan, Daniel Joseph (1915). History of Ohio: the Rise and Progress of an American State. 6. New York: The Century History Company. p. 357.

References

External links

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
George W. Geddes
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 14th congressional district

March 4, 1885 – March 3, 1887
Succeeded by
Charles P. Wickham
Preceded by
Beriah Wilkins
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 15th congressional district

March 4, 1887 – March 3, 1891
Succeeded by
Michael D. Harter
Preceded by
John M. Pattison
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 11th congressional district

March 4, 1893 – March 3, 1907
Succeeded by
Albert Douglas
54th United States Congress

The Fifty-fourth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1895, to March 4, 1897, during the last two years of Grover Cleveland's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Eleventh Census of the United States in 1890. The House had a Republican majority, and the Republicans were the largest party in the Senate.

55th United States Congress

The Fifty-fifth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from March 4, 1897, to March 4, 1899, during the first two years of William McKinley's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Eleventh Census of the United States in 1890. Both chambers had a Republican majority. There was one African-American member, George Henry White, a Republican from the state of North Carolina.

Albert Douglas

Albert Douglas (April 25, 1852 – March 14, 1935) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Chillicothe, Ohio, Douglas attended the public schools of Chillicothe and a preparatory school. He graduated from Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, in 1872 and from Harvard Law School in 1874. He was admitted to the bar in 1874 and commenced practice in Chillicothe, Ohio. He served as prosecuting attorney of Ross County 1877-1881. Presidential elector in 1896 for McKinley/Hobart.Douglas was elected as a Republican to the Sixtieth and Sixty-first Congresses (March 4, 1907 – March 3, 1911). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1910 to the Sixty-second Congress, and resumed the practice of law in Chillicothe, Ohio. He was appointed Ambassador Extraordinary to represent the United States at the centennial of the independence of Peru in 1921. He retired and resided in Washington, D.C., until his death in that city on March 14, 1935. He was interred in Grandview Cemetery, Chillicothe, Ross County, Ohio, USA.

Beriah Wilkins

Beriah Wilkins (July 10, 1846 – June 7, 1905) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Charles G. Bond

Charles Grosvenor Bond (May 29, 1877 – January 10, 1974) was a Republican United States Representative from the state of New York who served in the 67th United States Congress.

Charles Grosvenor (disambiguation)

Charles Grosvenor is a film director.

Charles Grosvenor may also refer to:

Charles H. Grosvenor, US Representative

Charles R. Grosvenor Jr, creator of Am I Right

George L. Converse

George Leroy Converse (June 4, 1827 – March 30, 1897) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Georgesville, Ohio, Converse attended the common schools and Ohio Central College, and was graduated from Denison University, Granville, Ohio, in 1849.

He studied law.

He was admitted to the bar in 1851 and commenced practice in Columbus, Ohio, in 1852.

He served as prosecuting attorney of Franklin County in 1857.

He served as member of the State house of representatives 1860-1863 and 1874–1876 and speaker of the house in 1874.

He served as member of the State senate in 1864 and 1865.

Converse was elected as a Democrat to the Forty-sixth, Forty-seventh, and Forty-eighth Congresses (March 4, 1879 – March 3, 1885).

He served as chairman of the Committee on Public Lands (Forty-sixth Congress).

He was not a candidate for renomination in 1884 to the Forty-ninth Congress.

He resumed the practice of his profession.

He served as delegate to the Nicaraguan Canal Convention in 1892, and made chairman of this and the subsequent convention held in New Orleans.

He died in Columbus, Ohio, March 30, 1897.

He was interred in Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio.

George W. Geddes

George Washington Geddes (July 16, 1824 – November 9, 1892) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Mount Vernon, Ohio, Geddes attended the common schools.

He studied law under Columbus Delano.

He was admitted to the bar in July 1845 and practiced.

He served as judge of the court of common pleas of the sixth judicial district in 1856.

He was reelected in 1861.

Geddes was again elected in 1868, and served until 1873.

He resumed the practice of law.

He was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for judge of the Supreme Court of Ohio in 1871.

He resumed the practice of law in Mansfield.

Geddes was elected as a Democrat to the Forty-sixth and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1879 – March 3, 1887).

He served as chairman of the Committee on War Claims (Forty-eighth and Forty-ninth Congresses).

He declined to be a candidate for reelection in 1886 to the Fiftieth Congress.

He resumed the practice of his profession.

He died in Mansfield, Ohio, November 9, 1892. He was interred in Mansfield Cemetery.

Married Nancy Lennon of Ashland County, Ohio in 1848, and had three sons, Samuel, James and George. Nancy died in 1878, and Geddes married Amelia Gass, December 1880.Geddes was a trustee of Ohio Wesleyan University and Mount Union College. He was a Methodist.

John M. Pattison

John M. Pattison (June 13, 1847 – June 18, 1906) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. Pattison was the 43rd Governor of Ohio, serving for a shorter period than any other person elected to the office before his death.

List of Speakers of the Ohio House of Representatives

The Speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives is the most powerful member of the Ohio House of Representatives. The Speaker is third in line to the Office of the Governor

Bell, William Jr. (1876). Annual report of the Secretary of State to the Governor and General Assembly for the year 1875... Ohio Secretary of State. | (party affiliations for pre-1874)

List of chairmen of the House Republican Conference

This is a list of Republican Conference Chairmen of the United States House of Representatives.

Michael D. Harter

Michael Daniel Harter (April 6, 1846 – February 22, 1896) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio, grandson of Robert Moore.

Born in Canton, Ohio, Harter attended the public schools.

He engaged in mercantile pursuits and banking.

He moved to Mansfield, Ohio, in 1869.

At the age of twenty-three became treasurer and manager of the Aultman &

Taylor Co. upon its organization.

He established the Harter Bank in 1866. He established the Isaac Harter Milling Company in Fostoria, the largest producer of flour in the state.Harter was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-second and Fifty-third Congresses (March 4, 1891 – March 3, 1895).

He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1894.

In congress, he was strongly in favor of the Gold Standard, and against free silver, views in opposition to his own party. His views won out during the Panic of 1893, when congress, in special session, repealed the Sherman Silver Purchase Act.

He moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, but spent his summers in Mansfield.

He committed suicide in Fostoria, Ohio, February 22, 1896.

He was interred in Mansfield Cemetery, Mansfield, Ohio.

Harter was married to Mary L. Brown in 1869, and they had three sons and two daughters. His wife and children, except one daughter survived him.

Milton M. Holland

Milton Murray Holland (August 1, 1844 – May 15, 1910) was a Union Army soldier during the American Civil War and a recipient of America's highest military decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions at the Battle of Chaffin's Farm.

Ohio's 11th congressional district

Ohio's 11th congressional district is represented by Representative Marcia Fudge, a Democrat, having been elected after the death of Stephanie Tubbs Jones. This district includes most of the majority-black precincts between Cleveland and Akron.

Ohio has had at least 11 congressional districts since the 1820 Census. The district's current configuration dates from the 1990 Census, when most of the old 21st District was combined with portions of the old 20th District to form the new 11th District. Much of Akron was added to the district when the congressional map was redrawn after the 2010 Census, when Ohio lost two seats in the House of Representatives.

With a Cook Partisan Voting Index of D+32, it is the most Democratic district in Ohio and the 19th most Democratic district in the nation.

It was one of several districts challenged in a 2018 lawsuit seeking to overturn Ohio's congressional map due to alleged unconstitutional gerrymandering. The lawsuit describes the 11th as "a detached shoulder blade with a robotic arm" extending from Cleveland to Akron.

Ohio's 15th congressional district

The 15th congressional district of Ohio is represented by Republican Steve Stivers. The district includes the southern portions of Columbus as well as communities west and south of the City. It also includes the college towns of Athens and Wilmington.

From 2003 to 2013 Union County and Madison County were entirely within the district's boundaries as is approximately half of Franklin County. The 15th district included the cities of Upper Arlington, Hilliard, Grove City, Grandview Heights, Plain City, London, and Wilmington. As well as the downtown and western portions of Columbus.

Thomas P. Grosvenor

Thomas Peabody Grosvenor (December 20, 1778 in Pomfret, Windham County, Connecticut – April 24, 1817 in Waterloo, Howard County, Maryland) was a United States Representative from New York.

United States House Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries

The United States House Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries is a defunct committee of the U.S. House of Representatives.

The Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries was created on December 21, 1887, replacing the Select Committee on American Shipbuilding and Shipowning Interests. The House Rules defined its jurisdiction as those matters concerning the United States Merchant Marine. This included all matters relating to transportation by water, the United States Coast Guard, life-saving service, lighthouses, lightships, ocean derelicts, the Coast and Geodetic Survey, the Panama Canal, and fisheries. Legislation referred to the committee also included matters involving seamen (their assignments, wages, treatment, and health) and officers (their titles, conduct, and licensing); the naming, measuring, licensing, and registering of vessels; navigation and related laws; pleasure yachts; collisions at sea, as well as international arrangements to prevent them; coasting districts; maritime schools; and, taxes, fines, and penalties on vessels. The committee has also regulated shipping in the Philippines and Hawaii. As did most committees of the House, the Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee created subcommittees to handle portions of its jurisdiction.

In 1919 the committee was given jurisdiction over wireless telegraphy and in 1932 its name was changed to the Committee on Merchant Marine, Radio, and Fisheries. After a dispute with the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, the jurisdiction over radio services was transferred to that committee in 1935 and the term "radio" was dropped from the name of the Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee. In 1995, most duties of the committee were transferred to the Committee on Resources and subsequently abolished.

United States House Committee on Mines and Mining

The United States House Committee on Mines and Mining is a defunct committee of the U.S. House of Representatives.

The Committee on Mines and Mining was created on December 19, 1865, for consideration of subjects relating to mining interests. It exercised jurisdiction over the Geological Survey, the Bureau of Mines, the establishment of mining schools and mining experimental stations, mineral land laws, the welfare of men working in mines, mining debris, relief in cases of mineral contracts connected with the prosecution of war, the mining of radium ore, and the Government's fuel yards in the District of Columbia.

In 1947, the committee was abolished and its duties were transferred to the United States House Committee on Public Lands.

United States congressional delegations from Ohio

These are tables of congressional delegations from Ohio to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.