Charles Goldenberg

Charles R. "Buckets" Goldenberg (April 15, 1911, in Odessa, Ukraine, Russian Empire – April 16, 1986, in Glendale, Wisconsin) was an All-Pro National Football League (NFL) American football player. He is often credited as the originator of the draw play by forcing Sid Luckman to hand off with his blitzing.[1]

Charles Goldenberg
Position:G / RB
Personal information
Born:April 15, 1911
Odessa, Russian Empire
Died:April 16, 1986 (aged 75)
Glendale, Wisconsin
Height:5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Weight:220 lb (100 kg)
Career information
High school:Milwaukee (WI) West Division
College:Wisconsin
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:120
Touchdowns:6
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Biography

Goldenberg was born in Odessa, Ukraine, Russian Empire, and was Jewish.[2][3] He and his family immigrated to Wisconsin in the United States when he was four years of age.[4][5] His nickname, a play on "buttocks," was "Buckets."[4] He grew up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and attended and played football for West Division High School in Milwaukee, where he was an All-City halfback.[4][6] He played college football for the University of Wisconsin Badgers football team.[5]

In 1933 as a rookie he led the NFL in touchdowns, with seven.[4][7] In 1939 he was 1st Team All-Pro (Chicago Herald Am.), and in 1942 he was 2nd Team, All-Pro (Associated Press and NFL).[7]

Goldenberg played in 120 NFL games while starting in 69 of them. He had 108 carries for 365 yards and six touchdowns, along with 11 receptions for 111 yards and one touchdown.[7] Most of his carries were in his first three seasons (98 of his 108). He had eight career interceptions, with 73 return yards and two touchdowns.[7]

He wrestled as a professional in the off-season.[8][4] Later in his career, he opened up restaurants.[8]

Goldenberg is one of ten players who were named to the National Football League 1930s All-Decade Team who have not been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was named “Outstanding Jewish Athlete of All Time” by the Green Bay B’nai B’rith Lodge in 1969, inducted into the Packers Hall of Fame in 1971,[4] and elected to the Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame in 1973.

See also

References

  1. ^ Goldenberg, Charles "Buckets", Jews in Sports. Retrieved August 28, 2010.
  2. ^ American Jewish Desk Reference - American Jewish Historical Society - Google Books
  3. ^ ‘Curly’s’ sidekick Nate Abrams a forgotten man in Packers’ lore | Jewish Telegraphic Agency
  4. ^ a b c d e f [1]
  5. ^ a b Borchert Field: Stories from Milwaukee’s Legendary Ballpark - Bob Buege
  6. ^ Buckets Goldenberg Stats | Pro-Football-Reference.com
  7. ^ a b c d Buckets Goldenberg Stats | Pro-Football-Reference.com
  8. ^ a b Chase's sports calendar of events: 1997 - Contemporary Books

External links

1939 Green Bay Packers season

The 1939 Green Bay Packers season was their 21st season overall and their 19th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 9–2 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a first-place finish in the Western Conference. The Packers ended the season by beating the New York Giants in the NFL Championship Game 27–0, earning the Packers their fifth NFL Championship and the first title game shutout ever recorded.

1942 Green Bay Packers season

The 1942 Green Bay Packers season was their 24th season overall and their 22nd season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–2–1 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a second-place finish in the Western Conference.

Bob Forte

Robert Dominic "Bob" Forte (July 15, 1922 – March 12, 1996) was an American football halfback/defensive back/linebacker in the National Football League. He played for the Green Bay Packers (1946–1950, 1952–1953).

Bob Monnett

Robert C. Monnett (February 27, 1910 – August 2, 1978) was a professional American football player who played halfback for six seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973.

Charley Brock

Charles Jacob "Charley" Brock (March 15, 1916 – May 25, 1987) was an American football center and linebacker.

Gerry Ellis

Gerry Ellis (born November 12, 1957

in Columbia, Missouri) is a former professional American football player who played running back for seven seasons for the Green Bay Packers.

Goldenberg

Goldenberg is a surname of Jewish-Austrian or Jewish Romanian origin. Notable people with the surname include:

Billy Goldenberg (born 1936), American composer

Carl Goldenberg (1907–1996), Canadian lawyer & politician

Charles Goldenberg (1911–1986), American football player

Eddie Goldenberg, Canadian political advisor

Efrain Goldenberg (born 1929), Peruvian politician

Grigory Goldenberg (1856–1880), Russian revolutionary

Isidor Goldenberg (1870-?), Romanian actor & singer

Larry Goldenberg (born 1953), Canadian medical researcher

Michael Goldenberg(born 1965), American writer

William Goldenberg, film editor

Edward Goldenberg Robinson (1893–1973), American film actor (given name Emanuel Goldenberg; became Edward G. Robinson)

Chelli Goldenberg (born 1954), Israeli actress & writer & blogger

Suzanne Goldenberg, Canadian-born journalistOther:

Goldenberg scandal, a political scandal in Kenya involving the Goldenberg International company

Goldenberg Candy Company, a subsidiary of the Just Born company

Hank Bruder

Henry George "Hank" Bruder Jr. (November 22, 1907 – June 29, 1970) was an American football player in the National Football League. He played nine years with the Green Bay Packers from 1931 to 1939 and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1972. Bruder attended Northwestern University, where he was a member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity.He was part of the offensive line that blocked for Pro Football Hall of Fame back Johnny "Blood" McNally.

Hank Gremminger

Charles Henry "Hank" Gremminger (September 1, 1933 – November 2, 2001) was an American football player, a defensive back in the National Football League for eleven seasons. He played ten seasons for the Green Bay Packers (1956–1965) and one for the Los Angeles Rams in 1966.

Jesse Whittenton

Urshell James "Jesse" Whittenton (May 9, 1934 – May 21, 2012) was an American football player who played nine seasons in the NFL, mainly for the Green Bay Packers.

Whittenton also played on the Senior PGA Tour in the late 1980s. His best finish was T-21 at the 1989 Showdown Classic.

John Martinkovic

John George Martinkovic (February 4, 1927 – February 8, 2018) was an American football defensive lineman in the National Football League for the Green Bay Packers and the New York Giants. He played college football and basketball at Xavier University and was drafted in the sixth round of the 1951 NFL Draft by the Washington Redskins.

Johnnie Gray

Johnnie Lee Gray (born December 18, 1953) is an American retired professional football player. Gray was a safety in the National Football League with the Green Bay Packers.

Mike Douglass (American football)

Michael Reese Douglass (born March 15, 1955 in St. Louis, Missouri) is a former American football player. He played outside linebacker for the Green Bay Packers (1978–1985) and the San Diego Chargers (1986) in the National Football League. He ranks third in the lists of tackles made by a Packers player.

Nate Barragar

Nathan Robert Barragar (June 3, 1907 – August 10, 1985) was an American collegiate and professional football player.

Pete Tinsley

Elijah Pope "Pete" Tinsley (March 16, 1913 – May 11, 1995) was a professional football player, born in Sumter, South Carolina, who played guard, defense and offense for eight seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1979.

Robert Brooks

Robert Darren Brooks (born June 23, 1970) is a former American football wide receiver who attended University of South Carolina and played for the Green Bay Packers (1992–1998) and the Denver Broncos.

Vernon Biever

Vernon Joseph Biever (May 21, 1923 – October 13, 2010 ) was an American photographer, most notably with the Green Bay Packers.

Biever covered his first Packers game in 1941 for The Milwaukee Sentinel while a student at St. Norbert College. He served in the United States Army during World War II. Later, he owned a Ben Franklin store and a travel agency in Port Washington, Wisconsin. He was the official team photographer from 1946 until his retirement in 2006.His photographs were collected in The Glory of Titletown (ISBN 0878339906). Biever's photographs have been featured in books, television shows, and movies.

Biever's son John is a photographer for Sports Illustrated. His other son, James, and grandson, Michael, also were photographers for the Packers.

Whitey Woodin

Howard Lee "Whitey" Woodin (January 29, 1894 – February 7, 1974) was an American football player. He played with the Racine Legion and the Green Bay Packers and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973. After retiring from football, Woodin remained in Green Bay and worked for many years at Falls Power and Paper Company.

Willie Buchanon

Willie James Buchanon (born November 4, 1950) is a former cornerback for the National Football League's Green Bay Packers and San Diego Chargers; he was defensive rookie of the year in 1972 and a two-time Pro Bowl player. He finished his career with his hometown San Diego Chargers, retiring with 28 career interceptions and 15 fumble recoveries.

Buckets Goldenberg—championships, awards, and honors

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