Charles F. Adams-class destroyer

The Charles F. Adams class is a ship class of 29 guided missile destroyers (DDG) built between 1958 and 1967. Twenty three destroyers were built for the United States Navy, three for the Royal Australian Navy, and three for the West German Bundesmarine. The design of these ships was based on that of Forrest Sherman-class destroyers, but the Charles F. Adams class were the first class designed to serve as guided missile destroyers.[Note 1] 19 feet (5.8 m) of length was added to the center of the design of the Forrest Sherman class to carry the ASROC launcher. The Charles F. Adams-class destroyers were the last steam turbine-powered destroyers built for the U.S. Navy. Starting with the later Spruance-class destroyers, all U.S. Navy destroyers have been powered by gas turbines. Some of the destroyers of the Charles F. Adams class served during the blockade of Cuba in 1962 and during the Vietnam War.

Charles F. Adams-class destroyer
USS Charles F Adams (DDG-2) underway c1973
USS Charles F. Adams
Class overview
Name: Charles F. Adams class
Builders:
Operators:
Preceded by: Farragut class
Succeeded by: Spruance class
Subclasses:
Completed: 23
Retired: 23
Preserved: 2
General characteristics
Type: Guided missile destroyer (DDG)
Displacement:
  • 3,277 tons standard
  • 4,526 full load
Length: 437 ft (133 m)
Beam: 47 ft (14 m)
Draft: 15 ft (4.6 m)
Propulsion:
  • 2 × steam turbines providing 70,000 shp (52,000 kW); 2 shafts
  • 4 × 1,275 psi (8,790 kPa) boilers
Speed: 33 knots (61 km/h; 38 mph)
Range: 4,500 nautical miles (8,300 km) at 20 knots (37 km/h)
Complement: 310-333
Sensors and
processing systems:
Armament:

New threat update and decommissioning

Although designed with cutting-edge technology for the 1950s, by the mid-1970s it was clear to the Navy that the Charles F. Adams-class destroyers were not prepared to deal with modern air attacks and guided missiles. To reduce this vulnerability, the U.S. Navy began the New Threat Upgrade (NTU) program. This consisted of a number of sensor, weapons and communications upgrades that were intended to extend the service lives of the ships. Under the NTU, these destroyers received improved electronic warfare capability through the installation of the AN/SLQ-32(V)2 EW Suite.

The upgraded combat system would include the MK86 Gun Fire Control System with AN/SPQ-9 radar, the Hughes AN/SPS-52C 3D radar, the AN/SPG-51C (Digital) Fire Control Radars, and the Naval Tactical Data System (NTDS). These ships were also planned to have the ability to launch several Harpoon antiship missiles, which were to be installed in their MK-11 Tartar missile launcher.

During the 1980s, the Reagan Administration chose to accelerate production of the Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruisers and build the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyers, both classes with the Aegis Combat System that was considered more effective than NTU-upgraded ships, to gradually replace all existing destroyer and cruiser classes (especially the expensive nuclear-powered cruisers). The result of this was that only three of Charles F. Adams-class destroyers, Tattnall, Goldsborough, and Benjamin Stoddert received the full upgrade. Other ships, of the class, such as Charles F. Adams, received only partial upgrades, which included the AN/SLQ-32 and Harpoon Missile upgrades, that were intended to extend their service lives until the Arleigh Burke class could reach operational capability.

The United States Navy decommissioned its last Charles F. Adams destroyer, Goldsborough, on 29 April 1993. The Australian and German navies decommissioned their last ships of this class by 2003. Four ships of this class were transferred to the Hellenic Navy in 1992, but those have also been decommissioned.

Charles F. Adams was originally planned to open as a museum ship sometime in 2018, but those plans were put on hold and the ship is planned to be scrapped in 2020. The German destroyer Mölders was made into a museum ship, but all of the other destroyers in the class have been sunk as targets, sunk for diving wrecks or sold for scrap.

Ships in class

Moelders
Mölders, a Lütjens-class destroyer as museum ship of the German Navy
Ship name Hull no. Builder Laid Down Launched Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
Charles F. Adams DDG-2 Bath Iron Works 16 June 1958 8 September 1959 10 September 1960 1 August 1990 Bound to scrap [5]
John King DDG-3 25 August 1958 30 January 1960 4 February 1961 30 March 1990 Scrapped [6]
Lawrence DDG-4 New York Shipbuilding Corporation 27 October 1958 27 February 1960 6 January 1962 30 March 1990 Scrapped [7]
Claude V. Ricketts DDG-5 18 May 1959 14 June 1960 5 May 1962 31 October 1989 Scrapped [8]
Barney DDG-6 10 August 1959 10 December 1960 11 August 1962 17 December 1990 Scrapped [9]
Henry B. Wilson DDG-7 Defoe Shipbuilding Company 28 February 1958 22 April 1959 17 December 1960 2 October 1989 Sunk as target [10]
Lynde McCormick DDG-8 4 April 1958 28 July 1959 3 June 1961 1 October 1991 Sunk as target [11]
Towers DDG-9 Todd Pacific Shipyards, Seattle, Washington 1 April 1958 23 April 1959 6 June 1961 1 October 1990 Sunk as target [12]
Sampson DDG-10 Bath Iron Works 2 March 1959 21 May 1960 24 June 1961 24 June 1991 Scrapped [13]
Sellers DDG-11 3 August 1959 9 September 1960 28 October 1961 31 October 1989 Scrapped [14]
Robison DDG-12 Defoe Shipbuilding Company 28 April 1959 27 April 1960 9 December 1961 1 October 1991 Scrapped [15]
Hoel DDG-13 3 August 1959 4 August 1960 16 June 1962 1 October 1990 Converted to power barge, then scrapped [16]
Buchanan DDG-14 Todd-Pacific Shipyards, Seattle, Washington 17 January 1958 11 May 1960 7 February 1962 1 October 1991 Sunk as target [17]
Berkeley DDG-15 New York Shipbuilding Corporation 1 June 1960 29 July 1961 15 December 1962 30 September 1992 Sold to Greece as Themistoklis (D221), scrapped later [18]
Joseph Strauss DDG-16 27 December 1960 9 December 1961 20 April 1963 1 February 1990 Sold to Greece as Formion (D220), scrapped later [19]
Conyngham DDG-17 1 May 1961 18 May 1962 13 July 1963 30 October 1990 Scrapped [20]
Semmes DDG-18 Avondale Shipyard 15 August 1960 20 May 1961 10 December 1962 14 April 1991 Sold to Greece as Kimon (D218), scrapped 2006 [21]
Tattnall DDG-19 14 November 1960 26 August 1961 13 April 1963 18 January 1991 Scrapped [22]
Goldsborough DDG-20 Puget Sound Bridge and Dredging Company, Seattle, Washington 3 January 1961 15 December 1961 9 November 1963 29 April 1993 Sold to Australia as a parts hulk, scrapped later. [23]
Cochrane DDG-21 31 July 1961 18 July 1962 21 March 1964 1 October 1990 Scrapped [24]
Benjamin Stoddert DDG-22 11 June 1962 8 January 1963 12 September 1964 20 December 1991 Sank while under tow en route for scrapping [25]
Richard E. Byrd DDG-23 Todd Pacific Shipyards, Seattle, Washington 12 April 1961 6 February 1962 7 March 1964 27 April 1990 Sold to Greece for parts, sunk as target later [26]
Waddell DDG-24 6 February 1962 26 February 1963 28 August 1964 1 October 1992 Sold to Greece as Nearchos (D219), sunk as target later [27]

Hellenic Navy

Four destroyers were transferred to the Hellenic Navy;

Lütjens class

LutjensHonors
Lütjens rendering honours after the September 11 attacks

The Lütjens-class destroyer was a modification of the Charles F. Adams class for the Bundesmarine (the Navy of West Germany). It differed from the Charles F. Adams class in the layout of the crew accommodations, the location of the bow sonar, a second large aerial mast and different funnels.

Perth class

The Royal Australian Navy had three Charles F. Adams-class units constructed to their own specifications (these ships were designated the Perth class). Although broadly similar to the US Navy's vessels, the Australian ships were fitted with the Ikara system instead of the ASROC that was fitted to the American units. The three ships were:

Notes

  1. ^ The Farragut class was built at roughly the same time, but they were classified as frigates until 1975.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Blackman, Raymond V. B. Jane's Fighting Ships (1970/71) p.437
  2. ^ Polmar, Norman "The U.S. Navy: Shipboard Radars" United States Naval Institute Proceedings December 1978 p.144
  3. ^ Polmar, Norman "The U.S. Navy: Shipboard Radars" United States Naval Institute Proceedings December 1978 p.145
  4. ^ Polmar, Norman "The U.S. Navy: Sonars, Part 1" United States Naval Institute Proceedings July 1981 p.119
  5. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_2.HTML
  6. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_3.HTML
  7. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_4.HTML
  8. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_5.HTML
  9. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_6.HTML
  10. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_7.HTML
  11. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_8.HTML
  12. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_9.HTML
  13. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_10.HTML
  14. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_11.HTML
  15. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_12.HTML
  16. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_13.HTML
  17. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_14.HTML
  18. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_15.HTML
  19. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_16.HTML
  20. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_17.HTML
  21. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_18.HTML
  22. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_19.HTML
  23. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_20.HTML
  24. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_21.HTML
  25. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_22.HTML
  26. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_23.HTML
  27. ^ http://www.nvr.navy.mil/SHIPDETAILS/SHIPSDETAIL_DDG_24.HTML

External links

5"/54 caliber Mark 42 gun

The Mark 42 5"/54 caliber gun (127mm) is a naval gun (naval artillery) mount used by the United States Navy and other countries. It consisted of the Mark 18 gun and Mark 42 gun mount. United States naval gun terminology indicates the gun fires a projectile 5 inches (127.0 mm) in diameter, and the barrel is 54 calibers long (barrel length is 5" × 54 = 270" or 6.9 meters.) In the 1950s a gun with more range and a faster rate of fire than the 5"/38 caliber gun used in World War II was needed, therefore, the gun was created concurrently with the 3"/70 Mark 26 gun for different usages. The 5"/54 Mk 42 is an automatic, dual-purpose (air / surface target) gun mount. It is usually controlled remotely from the Mk 68 Gun Fire Control System, or locally from the mount at the One Man Control (OMC) station.The self-loading gun mount weighs about 60.4 long tons (61.4 t) including two drums under the mount holding 40 rounds of semi-fixed case type ammunition. The gun fires 31.75 kg (70.0 lb) projectiles at a velocity of 2,650 ft/s (807.7 m/s). Maximum rate of fire is 40 rounds per minute. Magazine capacity is 599 rounds per mount. The Mark 42 mount originally was equipped for two on-mount gunners, one surface and one antiaircraft, but the antiaircraft gunner position was scrapped later on when the increasing speed of naval aircraft made manual aiming of antiaircraft weapons impractical. The Mark 45 lightweight (22.1 long tons (22.5 t)) gun mount began replacing the Mk 42 mount in 1971 for easier maintenance and improved reliability in new naval construction for the United States Navy.

Charles Francis Adams

Charles Francis Adams may refer to:

Charles Francis Adams Sr. (1807–1886), grandson of John Adams, son of John Quincy Adams, U.S. congressman, ambassador

Charles Francis Adams Jr. (1835–1915), son of above, American Civil War general and president of the Union Pacific Railroad

Charles Francis Adams III (1866–1954), nephew of above, U.S. Navy secretary

Charles Francis Adams IV (1910–1999), son of above, president of Raytheon

Charles Adams (ice hockey) (1876–1947), grocery magnate and founder of the Boston Bruins

Greek destroyer Kimon

Greek destroyer Kimon may refer to one of the following destroyers of the Hellenic Navy:

Greek destroyer Kimon (1981), the former Fletcher-class destroyer USS Ringgold (DD-500); launched, 1942; served as Z-2 (D171) in the West German Navy, 1959–1981; acquired by the Hellenic Navy, 1981; stricken and scrapped, 1993

Greek destroyer Kimon (D218), the former Charles F. Adams-class destroyer USS Semmes (DDG-18); launched, 1961; acquired by the Hellenic Navy, 1991; decommissioned, June 2004; scrapped, 2006

Greek ship Nearchos

At least two ships of the Hellenic Navy have borne the name Nearchos (Greek: Νέαρχος) after the ancient Cretan admiral Nearchus:

Greek destroyer Nearchos (D65), a Fletcher-class destroyer launched in 1943 as USS Wadsworth and transferred to Germany in 1959 as Z-3. She was transferred to Greece and renamed Nearchos in 1980 serving until scrapping in 1991.

Greek destroyer Nearchos (D219), a Charles F. Adams-class destroyer launched in 1963 as USS Waddell she was transferred to Greece in 1992 and renamed. She was sunk as a target in 2006.

Greek ship Themistoklis

At least four ships of the Hellenic Navy have borne the name Themistoklis (Greek: Θεμιστοκλής), sometimes rendered as Themistocles, after the ancient Athenian statesman:

Greek destroyer Themistoklis (L51) a Hunt-class destroyer launched in 1942 as HMS Bramham and transferred to Greece and renamed in 1943. She was returned to the Royal Navy in 1959 and scrapped in 1960.

Greek destroyer Themistoklis (D210) a Gearing-class destroyer launched in 1944 as USS Frank Knox she was transferred to Greece in 1971 and renamed. She was sunk as a target in 2001.

Greek destroyer Themistoklis (D221) a Charles F. Adams-class destroyer launched in 1961 as USS Berkeley she was transferred to Greece in 1992 and renamed. She was scrapped in 2004.

Greek frigate Themistoklis (F-465) an Elli-class frigate launched in 1979 as HNLMS Philips van Almonde she was transferred to Greece in 2002 and renamed.

HMAS Perth

Three ships of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) have been named HMAS Perth after Perth, the capital city of Western Australia.

HMAS Perth (D29), a modified Leander-class light cruiser. Commissioned into the Royal Navy as HMS Amphion in 1936, she was sold to the RAN three years later. The ship served until 1 March 1942, when she was sunk during the Battle of Sunda Strait.

HMAS Perth (D 38), the lead ship of the Perth-class guided missile destroyers. Built as a Charles F. Adams-class destroyer derivative for the RAN and commissioned in 1965, the ship served until decommissioning in 1999. She was sunk as a dive wreck off the coast of Albany, Western Australia, in 2001.

HMAS Perth (FFH 157), an Anzac-class frigate commissioned in 2006 and active as of 2016

Lawrence

Lawrence may refer to:

Lawrence (given name)

Lawrence (surname)

List of ship launches in 1959

The list of ship launches in 1959 includes a chronological list of all ships launched in 1959.

List of ship launches in 1960

The list of ship launches in 1960 includes a chronological list of all ships launched in 1960.

List of ship launches in 1961

The list of ship launches in 1961 includes a chronological list of all ships launched in 1961.

List of ship launches in 1962

The list of ship launches in 1962 includes a chronological list of all ships launched in 1962.

List of ship launches in 1963

The list of ship launches in 1963 includes a chronological list of all ships launched in 1963.

RIM-24 Tartar

The General Dynamics RIM-24 Tartar was a medium-range naval surface-to-air missile (SAM), and was among the earliest surface-to-air missiles to equip United States Navy ships. The Tartar was the third of the so-called "3 T's", the three primary SAMs the Navy fielded in the 1960s and 1970s, the others being the RIM-2 Terrier and RIM-8 Talos.

Tartar Guided Missile Fire Control System

The Tartar Guided Missile Fire Control System is an air defense system developed by the United States Navy to defend warships from air attack. Since its introduction the system has been improved and sold to several United States allies.

USS Cochrane

USS Cochrane (DDG-21) was a Charles F. Adams-class guided missile destroyer built for the United States Navy in the 1960s.

USS Hoel

Three ships of the United States Navy have borne the name USS Hoel in honor of William R. Hoel, a naval officer in the American Civil War:

USS Hoel (DD-533), a Fletcher-class destroyer commissioned in 1943 and sunk in 1944 during the Battle off Samar

USS Hoel (DD-768), a Gearing-class destroyer canceled during construction on 13 September 1946

USS Hoel (DDG-13), a Charles F. Adams-class destroyer commissioned in 1962 and struck in 1992

USS Lawrence

Five United States Navy ships have borne the name USS Lawrence in honor of James Lawrence.

USS Lawrence (1813) was a brig which acted as Commodore Oliver Perry's flagship during the first part of the Battle of Lake Erie until she became unmanageable in that action.

USS Lawrence (1843) was also a brig decommissioned in 1846.

USS Lawrence (DD-8) was a 400-ton Bainbridge-class destroyer, commissioned in 1903 and serving until 1920.

USS Lawrence (DD-250) was a Clemson-class destroyer, serving from 1921 to 1945.

USS Lawrence (DDG-4) was a Charles F. Adams-class destroyer commissioned in 1962, and serving until 1994.

USS Lynde McCormick

USS Lynde McCormick (DDG-8) was a Charles F. Adams-class destroyer in the United States Navy.

Lynde McCormick (DDG-8) was laid down 4 April 1958 by Defoe Shipbuilding Company, Bay City, Michigan; launched 28 July 1959; sponsored by Mrs. Lillian McCormick, wife of Admiral McCormick; and commissioned at Boston 3 June 1961, with Commander Ernest S. Cornwall, Jr., in command.

USS Sampson (DDG-10)

USS Sampson (DDG-10), named for Admiral William T. Sampson USN (1840–1902), was a Charles F. Adams-class guided missile destroyer in the United States Navy.

Sampson was laid down by the Bath Iron Works at Bath in Maine on 2 March 1959, launched on 21 May 1960 by Mrs. John S. Crenshaw and commissioned on 24 June 1961, Commander Forrester W. Isen in command.

Charles F. Adams-class destroyers
 United States Navy
 Royal Australian Navy
Perth class
 German Navy
Lütjens class
 Hellenic Navy
Kimon class

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