Charles Armstrong-Jones, Viscount Linley

Charles Patrick Inigo Armstrong-Jones, Viscount Linley (born 1 July 1999) is the son of David Armstrong-Jones, 2nd Earl of Snowdon, and Serena Armstrong-Jones, Countess of Snowdon. He is a great-grandson of King George VI through the king's younger daughter, Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon.[1] He is heir apparent to the Earldom of Snowdon and 21st in the line of succession to the British throne, after his father.[2]

Viscount Linley
Born
Charles Patrick Inigo Armstrong-Jones

1 July 1999 (age 19)
EducationEton College
Known forGrandnephew of Queen Elizabeth II and grandson of Princess Margaret
Parents
RelativesLady Margarita Armstrong-Jones (sister)

Biography

Armstrong-Jones was born at The Portland Hospital for Women and Children in London on 1 July 1999. He was baptised at St James's Palace in 1999 and his godparents are Lady Bruce Dundas, Nigel Harvey, Nick Powell, Orlando Rock, Lucinda Cecil and Rita Konig.[1] He has a sister, Lady Margarita Armstrong-Jones, who is three years younger. He uses his father's subsidiary title of Viscount Linley as a courtesy title.

In 2012, his grand-aunt Queen Elizabeth II appointed him to be her First Page of Honour.[3] In September of the same year, he began to attend Eton College, Berkshire. He is currently enrolled at Loughborough University in Leicestershire.

As a member of the extended British royal family, Armstrong-Jones attends events such as Trooping the Colour and Christmas at Sandringham. In honour of the Queen's Diamond Jubilee, Armstrong-Jones and his sister attended a thanksgiving service at St Paul's Cathedral in London.

Styles

  • 1999–2017: The Honourable Charles Armstrong-Jones
  • 2017–present: Viscount Linley

Ancestry

Ancestors of Charles Armstrong-Jones, Viscount Linley
16. Sir Robert Armstrong-Jones
8. Ronald Armstrong-Jones
17. Margaret Roberts
4. Antony Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon
18. Leonard Messel
9. Anne Messel
19. Maud Sambourne
2. David Armstrong-Jones, 2nd Earl of Snowdon
20. George V of the United Kingdom
10. George VI of the United Kingdom
21. Princess Mary of Teck
5. Princess Margaret of the United Kingdom
22. Claude Bowes-Lyon, 14th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne
11. Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon
23. Cecilia Cavendish-Bentinck
1. Charles Armstrong-Jones, Viscount Linley
24. Charles Stanhope, 10th Earl of Harrington
12. William Stanhope, 11th Earl of Harrington
25. Margaret Trelawney Seaton
6. Charles Stanhope, 12th Earl of Harrington
26. Sir John Foley Grey, 8th Baronet, of London
13. Eileen Foley Grey
27. Jean Jessie May de Sales la Terrière
3. Lady Serena Stanhope
28. Freeman Astley Jackson
14. Harry Freeman-Jackson
29. Florence-Josephine van Cutsem
7. Virginia Alleyne Freeman-Jackson
30. Louis Antoine d'Aubigny d'Engelbronner
15. Dorothy Alleyne d'Aubigny d'Engelbronner
31. Anna Chickering Sumner

References

  1. ^ a b "Charles Armstrong-Jones". The Peerage. Retrieved 16 May 2018.
  2. ^ "Who's Who members of the Royal Family". Ukwhoswho.com. Retrieved 22 September 2011.
  3. ^ Walker, Tim (1 March 2012). "The Queen turns a page for Viscount Linley's son". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 16 May 2018.
Charles Armstrong-Jones, Viscount Linley
Born: 1 July 1999
Lines of succession
Preceded by
The Earl of Snowdon
Line of succession to the British throne
21st position
Followed by
Lady Margarita Armstrong-Jones
Court offices
Preceded by
Jack Soames
Page of Honour
2012–2015
Succeeded by
Lachlan Legge-Bourke
1999

1999 (MCMXCIX)

was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1999th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 999th year of the 2nd millennium, the 99th year of the 20th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1990s decade.

1999 was designated as the International Year of Older Persons.

Anne Parsons, Countess of Rosse

Anne Parsons, Countess of Rosse (née Messel, previously Armstrong-Jones; 8 February 1902 – 3 July 1992), was a society hostess and one of the founders of The Victorian Society and the mother of Antony Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon.

Antony Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon

Antony Charles Robert Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon, (7 March 1930 – 13 January 2017), commonly known as Lord Snowdon, was a British photographer and filmmaker. He was the husband of Princess Margaret and brother-in-law of Queen Elizabeth II.

Armstrong-Jones

Armstrong-Jones is a compound surname composed of Armstrong and Jones. Notable people with the surname include:

Charles Armstrong-Jones, Viscount Linley (born 1999), the only son of the 2nd Earl of Snowdon

Lady Sarah Armstrong-Jones (Lady Sarah Chatto) (born 1964), the only daughter of the 1st Earl of Snowdon and Princess Margaret

Lady Margarita Armstrong-Jones (born 2002), the only daughter of the 2nd Earl of Snowdon

Sir Robert Armstrong-Jones, CBE (1857–1943), born Robert Jones, Welsh physician and psychiatrist

Ronald Armstrong-Jones MBE QC (1899–1966), British barrister and soldier and the father of Antony Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon

Anthony Armstrong Jones (born 1949), American country music singer known by his stage name

David Armstrong-Jones, 2nd Earl of Snowdon (born 1961), English furniture maker and chairman of the auction house Christie's UK

Serena Armstrong-Jones, Countess of Snowdon (born 1970), Anglo-Irish aristocrat, and by marriage, a niece-in-law of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh

Antony Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon, GCVO, RDI (1930–2017), English photographer and film maker

David Armstrong-Jones, 2nd Earl of Snowdon

David Albert Charles Armstrong-Jones, 2nd Earl of Snowdon (born 3 November 1961), styled as Viscount Linley until 2017 and known professionally as David Linley, is an English furniture maker and a former chairman of the auction house Christie's UK. The son of Princess Margaret and Antony Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon, he is therefore a nephew of Queen Elizabeth II, and a grandson of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother. As of June 2018, he is 20th in the line of succession to the British throne, where he is the first person who is not a direct descendant of the Queen. At the time of his birth in 1961, he was fifth.

Descendants of George V and Mary of Teck

This is a complete list of every known descendant of George V, the founder of the House of Windsor, and his queen Mary of Teck. The list includes deceased members, members who have become Catholic, royal and non-royal, legitimate and illegitimate members openly acknowledged by their parents. The table includes generational data and birthdays and image data. The list is more comprehensive than the line of succession to the British throne which is a list of living descendants of George V's sons.

Eton College

Eton College () is a 13–18 independent boarding school and sixth form for boys in the parish of Eton, near Windsor in Berkshire, England. It was founded in 1440 by King Henry VI as The King's College of Our Lady of Eton besides Wyndsor, as a sister institution to King's College, Cambridge, making it the 18th-oldest Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference school.

Eton is one of the original nine public schools as defined by the Public Schools Act 1868. The others are Harrow, Charterhouse, Rugby, Shrewsbury, Westminster, Winchester, Merchant Taylors' and St Paul's. Following the public school tradition, Eton is a full boarding school, which means pupils live at the school seven days a week, and it is one of only five such remaining single-sex boys' public schools in the United Kingdom (the others being Harrow, Radley, Sherborne and Winchester). The remainder have since become co-educational: Rugby (1976), Charterhouse (1971), Westminster (1973), and Shrewsbury (2014) and Merchant Taylors' which is now a day school. Eton has educated 19 British prime ministers and generations of the aristocracy and has been referred to as "the chief nurse of England's statesmen".Eton charges up to £12,910 per term, with three terms per academic year, in 2017/18. Eton was noted as being the sixth most expensive HMC boarding school in the UK in 2013/14, however the school admits some boys with modest parental income: in 2011 it was reported that around 250 boys received "significant" financial help from the school, with the figure rising to 263 pupils in 2014, receiving the equivalent of around 60% of school fee assistance, whilst a further 63 received their education free of charge. Eton has also announced plans to increase the figure to around 320 pupils, with 70 educated free of charge, with the intention that the number of pupils receiving financial assistance from the school continues to increase.

List of earls in the peerages of Britain and Ireland

This is a list of the 193 present and extant earls in the Peerages of the England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland, and the United Kingdom. Note that it does not include extant earldoms which have become merged (either through marriage or elevation) with marquessates or dukedoms and are today only seen as subsidiary titles. For a more complete list, which adds these "hidden" earldoms as well as extinct, dormant, abeyant, and forfeit ones, see List of earldoms.

Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon

Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon, (Margaret Rose; 21 August 1930 – 9 February 2002) was the younger daughter of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth and the only sibling of Queen Elizabeth II.

Margaret spent much of her childhood with her parents and sister. Her life changed dramatically in 1936, when her paternal uncle, King Edward VIII, abdicated to marry a divorcée, Wallis Simpson. Margaret's father became king, and her sister became heir presumptive, with Margaret second in line to the throne. During the Second World War, the two sisters stayed at Windsor Castle, despite suggestions to evacuate them to Canada. During the war years, Margaret was considered too young to perform any official duties and instead continued her education.

After the war, Margaret fell in love with Group Captain Peter Townsend. In 1952, Margaret's father died, her sister became queen, and Townsend divorced his first wife. Early the following year, he proposed to Margaret. Many in the government believed he would be an unsuitable husband for the Queen's 22-year-old sister, and the Church of England refused to countenance marriage to a divorced man. Margaret eventually abandoned her plans with him, and in 1960 she married the photographer Antony Armstrong-Jones, who was created Earl of Snowdon by the Queen. The couple had two children: David and Sarah.

Margaret was often viewed as a controversial member of the British royal family. Her divorce in 1978 earned her negative publicity, and she was romantically associated with several men. Her health gradually deteriorated in the final two decades of her life. A heavy smoker for most of her adult life, Margaret had a lung operation in 1985, a bout of pneumonia in 1993, and at least three strokes between 1998 and 2001. She died at King Edward VII's Hospital on 9 February 2002.

Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother

Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon (4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002) was the wife of King George VI and the mother of Queen Elizabeth II and Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon. She was Queen of the United Kingdom and the Dominions from her husband's accession in 1936 until his death in 1952, after which she was known as Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, to avoid confusion with her daughter. She was the last Empress of India.

Born into a family of British nobility, she came to prominence in 1923 when she married the Duke of York, the second son of King George V and Queen Mary. The couple and their daughters embodied traditional ideas of family and public service. She undertook a variety of public engagements and became known for her consistently cheerful countenance.In 1936, her husband unexpectedly became king when his older brother, Edward VIII, abdicated in order to marry the American divorcée Wallis Simpson. Elizabeth then became queen. She accompanied her husband on diplomatic tours to France and North America before the start of the Second World War. During the war, her seemingly indomitable spirit provided moral support to the British public. After the war, her husband's health deteriorated and she was widowed at the age of 51. Her elder daughter, aged 25, became the new queen.

From the death of Queen Mary in 1953, Elizabeth was viewed as the matriarch of the British royal family. In her later years, she was a consistently popular member of the family, even when other members were suffering from low levels of public approval. She continued an active public life until just a few months before her death at the age of 101 years, 238 days, seven weeks after the death of her younger daughter, Princess Margaret.

Serena Armstrong-Jones, Countess of Snowdon

Serena Alleyne Armstrong-Jones, Countess of Snowdon (née Stanhope; born 1 March 1970) is an Anglo-Irish aristocrat and the daughter-in-law of Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon, and a niece-in-law of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

Succession to the British throne

Succession to the British throne is determined by descent, sex (for people born before October 2011), legitimacy, and religion. Under common law, the Crown is inherited by a sovereign's children or by a childless sovereign's nearest collateral line. The Bill of Rights 1689 and the Act of Settlement 1701 restrict succession to the throne to the legitimate Protestant descendants of Sophia of Hanover who are in "communion with the Church of England". Spouses of Roman Catholics were disqualified from 1689 until the law was amended in 2015. Protestant descendants of those excluded for being Roman Catholics are eligible.Queen Elizabeth II is the sovereign, and her heir apparent is her eldest son, Charles, Prince of Wales. Next in line after him is Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, the Prince of Wales's elder son. Third in line is Prince George, the eldest child of the Duke of Cambridge, followed by his sister, Princess Charlotte and younger brother, Prince Louis. Sixth in line is Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, the younger son of the Prince of Wales. Under the Perth Agreement, which came into effect in 2015, only the first six in line of succession require the sovereign's consent before they marry; without such consent, they and their children would be disqualified from succession.

The first four individuals in the line of succession who are over 21, and the sovereign's consort, may be appointed Counsellors of State. Counsellors of State perform some of the sovereign's duties in the United Kingdom while he or she is out of the country or temporarily incapacitated. Otherwise, individuals in the line of succession need not have specific legal or official roles.

The United Kingdom is one of the 16 Commonwealth realms. Each of those countries has the same person as monarch and the same order of succession. In 2011, the prime ministers of the realms agreed unanimously to adopt a common approach to amending the rules on the succession to their respective Crowns so that absolute primogeniture would apply for persons born after the date of the agreement, instead of male-preference primogeniture, and the ban on marriages to Roman Catholics would be lifted, but the monarch would still need to be in communion with the Church of England. After the necessary legislation had been enacted in accordance with each realm's constitution, the changes took effect on 26 March 2015.

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