Charlene Pryer

Charlene Barbara Pryer [Mayer] (September 24, 1921 – June 3, 1999) was a female utility in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, playing mainly at second base and center field from 1946 through 1952. Listed at 5 ft 1 in (1.55 m), 105 lb., Pryer batted and threw right-handed. She was nicknamed Shorty amongst her friends and family members because of her slight build and minuscule stature.[1][2]

Charlene Pryer is recognized as one of the fastest baserunners of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League in its twelve years of existence. An All-Star at second base, she also led all outfielders in fielding percentage in a single season and topped the circuit in stolen bases for two consecutive years. In a career that spanned seven seasons, she was a member of two championship teams while hitting a .255 average with 510 stolen bases in 704 games, including single-season leads in hits and in runs scored.[1]

The AAGPBL flourished in the 1940s when the Major Leagues went on hold as men went to World War II. The circuit operated from 1943 to 1954 and gave over 600 women athletes the opportunity to play professional baseball and to play it at a level never before attained. Since the only organized ball for women in the country was softball, the AAGPBL created a hybrid game which included both softball and baseball. Over the twelve years of history of the league, the rules were gradually modified to more closely resemble baseball, progressively changing the pitching styles, extending the length of the base paths and pitching distance and decreasing the size of the ball until the final year of play.[3]

Charlene Pryer
Charlene Pryer
All-American Girls Professional Baseball League
Center field / Second base
Born: September 24, 1921
Watsonville, California
Died: June 3, 1999 (aged 77)
Medford, Oregon
Batted: Right Threw: Right
debut
1946
Last appearance
1952
Career statistics
Games played  704
At-bats2632
Runs scored  463
Hits  672
Runs batted in  152
Stolen bases  510
Batting average .255
Teams
Career highlights and awards
  • All-Star Team (second base, 1951)
  • Single-season leader in
    stolen bases (1951–1952)
    hits (1951)
    runs scored (1951)
    fielding percentage (outfielder, 1947)
  • Two Championship Teams (1951–1952)
  • Five playoff appearances (1947–1949, 1951–1952)

Early life

A native of Watsonville, California, Pryer was the daughter of Willard 'Maurice' Pryer, a minor league pitcher who played in the early 1940s for the Fargo-Moorhead Twins of the Northern League. Her father and his brothers were known for their baseball playing skills in Fortuna, California Besides teaching her basic baseball fundamentals, Pryer's father also taught her that hard work and determination were key to success. Following her school graduation, Pryer joined the United States Marine Corps Women's Reserve in 1944, entertaining troops as a singer with the Dick Jurgens Orchestra. Notably, she also was one of the first female disc jockeys in the United States. After serving in the military for 28 months she became a ballplayer in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.[2][4][5]

AAGPBL career

Pryer entered the league in 1946 with the expansion Muskegon Lassies, playing for them through the 1950 midseason before joining the Kalamazoo Lassies (1950) and South Bend Blue Sox (1950–1952). In her rookie season, she hit .202 in 108 games, including 77 hits and 18 runs batted in while scoring 64 times. Considering the AAGPBL was using underhand pitching and a ball with a 11-inch circumference, her numbers were quite respectable. In 1947 Pryer improved to .249 (105-for-422) in 108 games, scoring 51 runs while driving in 20 more. In addition, she was voted the best outfielder in the league with a fielding average of .995.[1][6][7]

Pryer increased her numbers in 1948, when the league switched to overhand pitching. She raised her average to a solid .262 (107-for-406), scoring 70 runs with 29 RBI in 112 games, but missed most of the 1949 season after suffering a severely broken ankle while sliding on a base. At the time of her injury, she was batting .235 with 56 runs and 10 RBI in 76 game appearances.[1][8][9][10]

In 1950 Pryer returned to the Lassies. She started the year in Muskegon, moved with the team to Kalamazoo during the midseason, and landed in South Bend late in the year. But she was still finding ways to improve her game, regardless of moving to different towns, bolstering her average to .269 (115-for-497) with 75 runs and 25 RBI, while matching her season-high of 112 games.[1][11][12]

Pryer had her most productive season in 1951, when she posted career-numbers with a .312 average, 133 hits, 106 runs, 32 RBI and 129 stolen bases in 109 games, leading the league in hits, runs and steals, while ranking seventh to Betty Foss of the Fort Wayne Daisies, who won the batting crown with a .368 average. Pryer capped her big season with an All-Star Team selection and a championship title with the Blue Sox. With Karl Winsch at the helm, South Bend combined strong pitching with good hitting, collecting a 76–36 record in the regular season, then defeating Fort Wayne in the first round of the playoffs, two to one games. In the best-of-five series, South Bench clinched the title over the Rockford Peaches after overcoming a 2–0 deficit. In addition to the standout pitching of Jean Faut, who won 15 games during the regular season and four more in the two playoffs, Pryer averaged .357 in South Bend's final three victories.[1][13][14]

Winsch, after a positive season, became more demanding of his players. Dissension within the South Bend team peaked just before the 1952 season ended, when Pryer was disciplined following a dispute with Winsch. The incident occurred when he suspended Pryer from the team after she responded slowly to his order to pinch-run late in a game. In protest, five South Bend teammates joined Pryer in a walkout, leaving Winsch's team short-handed for the playoffs. Pryer was reinstated at the club, but she decided to retire for good. That season she stole a league-high 59 bases, despite appearing in only 79 games. She added a .239 average and drove in 18 runs while scoring 41 times.[1][13][15]

Life after baseball

Following her baseball retirement, Pryer married Jack Stuart Mayer, who died in 1993. The couple had a daughter, a son and three granddaughters. A longtime resident of Medford, Oregon, she worked as a school truant officer and playground assistant for Medford School District 549C for more than 25 years, retiring in 1994. As a campus monitor and attendance investigative officer, she also worked at recesses, becoming a forward on the basketball court, a running back on the gridiron, or reprising her role as player on the baseball field by coaxing speedy runs, strong swings and artful catches from hundreds of students. She also managed to referee, coach and make sure everyone minded their manners. Besides her passion for music and sports, she served as a Rogue Valley Medical Center auxiliary volunteer and was a member of the Christ Unity Church in Medford.[2]

Charlene died in her home of Medford at the age of 77. In October 1999, four months after her death, the Wilson Elementary School officially dedicated its baseball field in her honor. She also is part of the AAGPBL permanent display inaugurated at the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum at Cooperstown, New York in 1988, which is dedicated to the entire league rather than any individual player.[3][16]

Sources

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "All-American Girls Professional Baseball League – Charlene Pryer entry".
  2. ^ a b c "The Mail Tribune obituary".
  3. ^ a b "All-American Girls Professional Baseball League History". Archived from the original on 2009-08-28.
  4. ^ Charlene Pryer at Baseball Reference
  5. ^ Willard Pryer at Baseball Reference
  6. ^ 1946 Muskegon Lassies
  7. ^ 1947 Muskegon Lassies
  8. ^ All-American Girls Professional Baseball League – Rules of Play Archived September 17, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ 1948 Muskegon Lassies Archived September 17, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ 1949 Muskegon Lassies Archived September 17, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  11. ^ 1950 Muskegon Lassies Archived September 17, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  12. ^ 1950 South Bend Blue Sox
  13. ^ a b "SABR Project – Jean Faut biography by Jim Sargent".
  14. ^ 1951 South Bend Blue Sox
  15. ^ 1952 South Bend Blue Sox
  16. ^ Medford Mail Tribune – Wilson Elementary School dedicate its ball field to Charlene 'Shorty' Pryer Mayer
1921 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1921 throughout the world.

1947 All-American Girls Professional Baseball League season

The 1947 All-American Girls Professional Baseball League season marked the fifth season of the circuit. The teams Fort Wayne Daisies, Grand Rapids Chicks, Kenosha Comets, Muskegon Lassies, Peoria Redwings, Racine Belles, Rockford Peaches and South Bend Blue Sox competed through a 112-game schedule. The final Shaugnessy playoffs faced second place Grand Rapids against third place Racine in a Best of Seven Series.By April 1947, all of the league's players were flown to Havana, Cuba for spring training. At the time, the Brooklyn Dodgers trained in the Cuban capital because Jackie Robinson, who would be the first Afro-American to play in the Major Leagues, was training with the Dodgers for the first time. By then, city ordinances in Vero Beach, Florida, where the Dodgers normally trained, prevented blacks and whites players from competing on the same field against each other. Notably, newspaper stories from Havana indicate that the All-American girls drew larger crowds for their exhibition games at Estadio Latinoamericano than did the Dodgers.In addition to the eight team practices, early 55.000 Cuban fans attended a round-robin tournament which took place at Estadio Latinoamericano at the end of the training. The Racine Belles won the tournament and received a commemorative trophy from Esther Williams, American competitive swimmer and MGM movie star.All in all, the rules, strategy and general play were the same in 1947. The sidearm pitching was strictly used, as the league was moving toward full overhand delivery for the next season. The sidearm throwing allowed the hitters more of an advantage than previous seasons. Rockford's Dorothy Kamenshek repeated her batting crown with a .306 batting average in a close race with Audrey Wagner (.305) of Kenosha. Nevertheless, five no-hitters were recorded during the regular season by Racine's Doris Barr, Muskegon Erma Bergmann, Kenosha's Jean Cione, and Rockford's Margaret Holgerson and Betty Luna. The pitching highlight came from Muskegon's Doris Sams, who hurled the third perfect game in league history. In addition, P/OF Sams posted an 11-4 record and a 0.98 earned run average in 19 pitching appearances, while batting a combined average of .280 (97-for-346) in 107 total games. Following the season, Sams was honored with the AAGPBL Player of the Year Award.At the end, Grand Rapids, Muskegon and Racine battled for the regular season title, until Muskegon got the victory with just two days remaining the schedule. Muskegon lost to Racine in the first round, three games to one, behind a strong pitching effort from Anna Mae Hutchison, who was credited with all three victories for Racine. By the other side, Grand Rapids defeated South Bend in five games guided by Connie Wisniewski, who pitched a win, stole home plate for another win, and collected an average of .318 (7-for-22).The second round was a tight fight, when the first three contests all went to extra innings and Grand Rapids held a 3-1 advantage in the best of seven series. But the defending champion Racine won the next two games to force a decisive game seven. In a pitching duel, Mildred Earp defeated Hutchison and the Belles on a 1–0, five hit shutout, while driving in the winning run to give Grand Rapids the championship.In 1947 average crowds at AAGPBL games were two to three thousand people, while attendance records were set in Muskegon, Peoria and Racine ballparks .

1948 All-American Girls Professional Baseball League season

The 1948 All-American Girls Professional Baseball League season marked the sixth season of the circuit. The AAGPBL grew to an all-time peak of ten teams in that season, representing Eastern and Western zones, just in the first year the circuit shifted to strictly overhand pitching. Other modifications occurred during 1948. The ball was decreased in size from 11½ inches to 10⅜ inches, while the base paths were lengthened to 72 feet and the pitching distance increased to 50 feet.The Chicago Colleens and the Springfield Sallies were added to the previous roster that included the Kenosha Comets, Fort Wayne Daisies, Grand Rapids Chicks, Muskegon Lassies, Peoria Redwings, Racine Belles, Rockford Peaches and South Bend Blue Sox. The Chicago, Fort Wayne, Grand Rapids, Muskegon and South Bend teams were aligned in the East Division, while Kenosha, Peoria, Racine, Rockford and Springfield played in the Western Division. The number of games in the schedule increased from 112 to 126.For the second consecutive year the AAGPBL spring training camp was held in Havana, Cuba. as part of a plan to create an International League of Girls Baseball. Around two hundred girls made the trip. Among them, players represented 27 different states in the United States and many provinces of Canada, while several Cuban players entered the league as a result of holding spring training there the year before. A total of 21 players had been in the league since its foundation in 1943.The fact of two divisions resulted in the Shaughnessy system adding another round of playoffs to decide the championship between eight teams. The first round faced the top teams of each division in a best-of-three series, with the first place team playing against the third place team and the second place team against the fourth place team. The winners competed in a best-of-five divisional first round, with the first place team facing the third place team and the second place team against the fourth place team. The sectional champions then advanced to the third round and faced in the best-of-seven Championship Series.Pitchers continued to dominate the league in that season, even though many of them could not adapt to the new pitching style. Grand Rapids' Alice Haylett led all pitchers with a 0.77 earned run average, while 20 averaged at least a 1.99 mark. In addition, Haylett and Racine's Eleanor Dapkus hurled 10 shutouts a piece. The only .300 hitter was Kenosha's Audrey Wagner (.312), who also led the circuit in hits (130) and total bases (186). At the end of the season Wagner was honored with the AAGPBL Player of the Year Award.The Grand Rapids and Racine teams won their respective division. In the first round, Grand Rapids, Fort Wayne, Racine and Rockford swept South Bend, Muskegon, Peoria and Kenosha, respectively. In the divisional playoffs, Fort Wayne swept Grand Rapids and Rockford did the same with Racine. Then, Rockford jumped out to a three-game lead in the final series and defeated Fort Wayne four games to one. Helen Nicol was credited with four of the 10 playoff wins of Rockford, including two in the finals, while Lois Florreich and Margaret Holgerson took three a piece. In Game 1 of the first round, Florreich pitched the first no-hitter in series history, and Holgerson threw a second no-hitter in Game 3 to set an all-time record for the most playoff no-hitters. Another highlight came in the first round, when South Bend's Jean Faut outdueled Haylett of Grand Rapids, 3–2, in 20 innings, in what would be the longest game in AAGPBL playoff history.The league drew almost a million fans for the second consecutive season, although the Chicago and Springfield franchises failed to reach the attendance required. Then, the Colleens and the Sallies were turned into player development teams that toured and played exhibition games to recruit and train new players. The tour started in Chicago and ended up in Canada, including stops in Yankee Stadium and Griffith Stadium.

1949 All-American Girls Professional Baseball League season

The 1949 All-American Girls Professional Baseball League season marked the seventh season of the circuit. With the Chicago Colleens and Springfield Sallies turning into rookie development teams after the 1948 season, the AAGPBL was left with eight squads: the Kenosha Comets, Fort Wayne Daisies, Grand Rapids Chicks, Muskegon Lassies, Peoria Redwings, Racine Belles, Rockford Peaches and South Bend Blue Sox. The teams competed through a 112-game schedule.This time the league adopted a smaller ball during the midseason, from 10⅜ inches to 10 inches, while the pitching distance increased 50 feet to 55 feet. The transition toward traditional baseball increased significantly. As a result, some talented pitchers jumped up to the rival Chicago National League when they could not adapt to the overhand delivery adopted the previous season. Pitching still outweighed hitting in the league, as no hitter could top the .300 average mark for the year. Rockford's Lois Florreich collected a 0.67 earned run average and South Bend's Jean Faut had a .909 winning percentage, both all-time single season records, while South Bend's Lillian Faralla hurled two no-hitters and Faut added another one for the team.The greatest highlight of the season came from Muskegon's pitcher/outfielder Doris Sams, who won the batting crown with a .279 average and posted a 15-10 record with a 1.58 ERA, to become the first player in league history to win two Player of the Year Awards. She obtained her first distinction in the 1947 season.The South Bend team finished tied in first place along with Rockford. In the first round of the Shaughnessy playoffs, third place Grand Rapids and sixth place Muskegon won their respective best-of-three series against fifth place Fort Wayne and fourth place Kenosha. In the second round, Rockford defeated South Bend in a best-of-seven series and Rockford won over Grand Rapids in a best-of-five series to determine the championship, which was won by Rockford in the final best-of-five series.The AAGPBL peaked in attendance during the 1947 and 1948 seasons, when the teams attracted almost a million paid fans for consecutive year. But for the first time, the league failed to reach the attendance desired since its foundation in 1943.

1950 All-American Girls Professional Baseball League season

The 1950 All-American Girls Professional Baseball League season marked the eight season of the circuit. The teams Fort Wayne Daisies, Grand Rapids Chicks, Kenosha Comets, Muskegon Lassies, Peoria Redwings, Racine Belles, Rockford Peaches and South Bend Blue Sox competed through a 112-game schedule.In 1950 the league used a livelier 10 inches ball. Finally, the batting was able to take advantage of the pitching, when five hitters reached the .300 average mark for the year. Fort Wayne's rookie Betty Foss led the circuit with a .346 average, to set a new season mark.Nevertheless, three no-hitters were recorded in the season, two of them by Jean Cione of Kenosha during the month of August. Her first was a 12-inning gem against Grand Rapids, and the second came in a seven-inning shutout over Racine. Previously, Kenosha's Ruby Stephens had pitched a nine-inning no-no against the Lassies in July.Grand Rapids' Alma Ziegler posted a 19-7 record and a solid 1.38 earned run average in 35 games, leading all pitchers in winning percentage (.732). She also tossed 43 straight shutout inning, and finished second in ERA behind South Bend's Jean Faut (1.12). Ziegler was honored with the Player of the Year Award.The league returned to the Shaugnessy format during the playoffs, featuring the top four teams of the season. In the best-of-five first round, first place Rockford won Kenosha and second place Fort Wayne defeated fourth place Grand Rapids. The final series took all seven games to decide the champion team. After winning the first two games, Rockford lost the next two games to Fort Wayne. Rockford took a 3-2 advantage in Game 5, but Fort Wayne won the next contest to send the series to a seventh game. Finally, Rockford never gave Fort Wayne a chance at another upset and won the series, four to three games. Helen Nicol was credited with three of the four victories of Rockford in the finals, including a shutout in decisive Game 7. Bill Allington guided the Peaches to their third title in a row, fourth overall, to set two all-time records for a manager.In 1950 the AAGPBL declined in attendance for the second consecutive year. Poor financial management finally caught up to the league and it began to slide. At the end of the season, team directors voted to purchase the league from Arthur Meyerhoff and operate their teams independently. That season had been a nightmare for Muskegon, after registering the worst record in the circuit and a relocation during the midseason to Kalamazoo, Michigan, where the team was renamed the Kalamazoo Lassies. Besides this, the Racine franchise, a two-time champion and one of the four original teams, had to move to Battle Creek, Michigan. The team would be renamed the Battle Creek Belles for the next season.

1951 All-American Girls Professional Baseball League season

The 1951 All-American Girls Professional Baseball League season marked the ninth season of the circuit. The teams Battle Creek Belles, Fort Wayne Daisies, Grand Rapids Chicks, Kalamazoo Lassies, Kenosha Comets, Peoria Redwings, Rockford Peaches and South Bend Blue Sox competed through a 112-game schedule, while the Shaugnessy playoffs featured the top four teams from each half of the regular season.In 1951, many things changed in relation to the previous season, when attendance began to decline dramatically. The Racine Belles franchise was moved to Battle Creek, Michigan, while the Chicago Colleens and Springfield Sallies traveling teams were disbanded. Betty Foss of Fort Wayne led all hitters for the second year in a row with a .368 batting average, breaking her own single-season record of .346 set in her rookie season. Foss also topped the league with 34 doubles, setting an all-time single-season record that would never be surpassed. Nine pitchers recorded an earned run average below 2.00, while Rose Gacioch of Rockford was the only one to gain 20 victories during the year. The Player of the Year Award was given to South Bend pitcher Jean Faut, who posted a 15–7 record with a 1.33 ERA and a league-leading 135 strikeouts, including a perfect game against Rockford on July 21 of that season.During the best-of-three series, first-place South Bend defeated third-place Fort Wayne, two games to one, while second-place Grand Rapids swept fourth-place Rockford in two games. South Bend pitching star Jean Faut drove in a run and held Fort Wayne to a run in Game 1, and later struck out nine batters and allowed one run in Game 3 to advance to the finals. In the other series, Rockford's Helen Nicol gave up six hits and shut out Grand Rapids in the first contest, while Marie Mansfield hurled a 7–6, 11-inning victory to defeat the Chicks.The final series took all five games to decide the champion team. Rockford held a 2–0 advantage in the series and looked to take it all, but South Bend rebounded and won the last three games to clinch the title. In Game 3, Faut stopped the Peaches in their tracks, pitching a six-hit, 3–2 victory, and picked up the win in a seven-inning relief effort in Game 5 to continue her winning ways. South Bend batted a collective .275 average in the finals, with Jane Stoll leading the offense with a .333 average (6-for-18) and six RBI, while Senaida Wirth batted .412 (7-for-17) and scored four runs, and Betty Wagoner hit .389 (7-for-18) with five runs.In 1951, the AAGPBL attendance declined for the third straight year. As revenues fell, individual teams' funds were limited to advertise nationally as a way of recruiting scattered baseball talent. With no centralized control of publicity, promotion, rookie training teams, and equalization of player talent, the League began to break down. The Kenosha and Peoria franchises withdrew at the end of the year, leaving the league with six teams for the next season.

1952 All-American Girls Professional Baseball League season

The 1952 All-American Girls Professional Baseball League season marked the tenth season of the circuit. The teams Battle Creek Belles, Fort Wayne Daisies, Grand Rapids Chicks, Kalamazoo Lassies, Rockford Peaches and South Bend Blue Sox competed through a 110-game schedule, while the Shaugnessy playoffs featured the top four teams from each half of the regular season.In 1952 the league was left with six teams, as Kenosha and Peoria folded at the end of the previous season. No changes were made to the game, but attendance continued to decline. Joanne Weaver of Fort Wayne won the batting crown with a .344 average, while her older sister and teammate Betty Foss was honored with the Player of the Year Award. Foss registered the second best average (.331) and led the league in total bases (209), runs scored (81), runs batted in (74), doubles (24) and triples (17). South Bend's Jean Faut won the pitching Triple Crown, after leading the league in earned run average (0.93) and strikeouts (114), while tying with Rockford's Rose Gacioch for the most victories (20). Faut also posted the best win–loss record (.909), that would eventually become the highest in league history. Furthermore, Marilyn Jones of Battle Creek hurled the only no-hitter of the season against Rockford on July 10.During the best-of-three series, first place Fort Wayne lost to third place Rockford, two games to one, while second place South Bend swept fourth place Grand Rapids. Fort Wayne won the first game, 5–4, in a heroic 10-inning effort by Maxine Kline. But Rockford won the next contest, 4–3, with strong pitching from Rose Gacioch, who limited the powerful Daisies to a run after struggling in the first inning. In Game 3, Migdalia Pérez scattered six hits in a 6–0 shutout against Fort Wayne, while receiving offensive support from Jean Buckley, who went 4-for-4 with four RBI. In the other series, South Bend disposed of Grand Rapids in two games. Jean Faut struck out nine Chicks in a three-hit, 2–1 victory while facing Alma Ziegler in Game 1. Then, Glenna Sue Kidd defeated Earlene Risinger and Grand Rapids in Game 2, 6–1, to face Grand Rapids in the finals. South Bend clinched the title over the Peaches, 3 to 2 games. Once more Faut was brilliant in the final series, winning two games and batting an average of .300 (6-for-20) with two triples and three RBI, while leading the Blue Sox to their second championship in a row.Attendance continued to decline, but no figures are available. For the second consecutive year Battle Creek failed to capture a sustainable fan base. The team would be relocated and renamed Muskegon Belles for the next season.

All-American Girls Professional Baseball League All-Star Team

The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL) was a women's professional baseball circuit which existed for twelve seasons from 1943 through 1954.For the first three seasons the league did not have an official All-Star team. Nevertheless, on July 1, 1943 took effect the first All-Star Game of the league, which coincidentally became the first night game ever played at Wrigley Field. The contest was played under temporary lights between two teams composed of Racine Belles and Kenosha Comets players against South Bend Blue Sox and Rockford Peaches players. At the end of the inaugural season the league selected an All-Star team composed of fifteen players. Currently there are no records available to indicate that an All-Star team was recognized during the 1944 and 1945 seasons.Starting in 1946, the team's managers of the league selected a squad of All-Star players as a result of individual achievements and performances during the regular season. In the voting, more than a hundred players received some recognition in nine successive seasons and the All-Star Team would play against the club with the best record in an exhibition game.

All-American Girls Professional Baseball League batting records

This is a list of All-American Girls Professional Baseball League players who posted the best offensive marks in the history of the circuit.

Incidentally, the relatively low batting averages for many players reflect mainly the high quality of the AAGPBL pitchers, rather than a lack of skills by the hitters.

Amy Applegren

Amy Irene "Lefty" Applegren (November 16, 1926 – April 3, 2011) was an American baseball pitcher and infielder who played from 1944 through 1953 in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. Listed at 5'4, 125 lb., she batted and threw left-handed.

Barbara Hoffman

Barbara Hoffman (born January 18, 1931) is a former infielder who played from 1951 through 1952 in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. Listed at 5' 6" [1.68 m], 133 lb. [60 k], she batted and threw right-handed.Born in Belleville, Illinois, Barbara Hoffman began playing softball at age nine and advanced to organized softball leagues in St. Louis, where she was spotted by an AAGPBL scout who offered her a contract to play for the 1951 season.Hoffman joined the South Bend Blue Sox and was inserted at third base. But she hurt a knee and was temporarily switched to second base because the pivot was easier to catch. She hit .212 with 20 runs and 11 RBI in just 46 games, helping the Blue Sox win their first championship title in the league.In 1952, Hoffman was selected to the All Star Team and belted a home run in the contest, which she considered her greatest individual thrill. Just before the regular season ended, South Bend manager Karl Winsch suspended the flashy Charlene Pryer for not going in to pinch-run quickly when asked, which created an uproar after the game. That night at the team's hotel, several Blue Sox veterans talked the situation over. Then five players, including Hoffman, Elizabeth Mahon and Jane Stoll, quit the team in support of Pryer. I guess it was wrong for us to do it. We stood up for our principles, Hoffman reflected. She never returned to the league.Following her baseball career, Hoffman played three years with the South Bend Hoosierettes, a women's basketball team, and bowled for 25 years, but never professionally. She also took a job at Bendix Corporation, where she worked for thirty-three years until her retirement in 1985. After that, she dedicated to selling baseball cards and antiques.Barbara Hoffman is part of Women in Baseball, a permanent display at the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum at Cooperstown, New York, which was unveiled in 1988 to honor the entire All-American Girls Professional Baseball League rather than individual baseball personalities. She currently lives in New Albany, Indiana.

Charlene (given name)

Charlene is a feminine given name, a feminine form of Charles coined in the United States the nineteenth century; from French Charles, from Old French Charles & Carles, from the Latin Carolus, from and also reinfluenced by Old High German Karl, from the Proto-Germanic *karlaz (lit. "Free Man"/"Free Spirit"/Free Thinker); compare the Old English word churl and the Old German Kerl.

Eagle Point National Cemetery

Eagle Point National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located just east of Eagle Point, Jackson County of the U.S. state of Oregon and about 14 miles (20 km) northeast of Medford. Administered by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, it encompasses 43.4 acres (17.6 ha), and as of 2014, had over 17,000 interments.

Janet Wiley

Janet M. Wiley [Sears] (October 12, 1933 – July 10, 2010) was an infielder and pitcher who played from 1950 through 1953 in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. Listed at 5 ft 4 in (1.63 m), 112 lb, she batted and threw right-handed.A member of a champion team, Janet Wiley saw her career shortened due to a severe injury and a polemic suspension.

Born in South Bend, Indiana, Janet was one of six children born to Adam and Lucy (née Lawton) Wiley. She was called ״Pee Wee״, a nickname that she acquired at an early age while playing sandlot ball with her three brothers and the boys of her neighborhood. She grew up watching her hometown South Bend Blue Sox play at Playland Park. Then she had an inside track on the league when she became a bat girl for her home team in the 1945 season. Her duties varied from collecting the bats to keeping ice water ready for the players during games. She alternated with her fellow bat girl in working for the visiting teams as well.Wiley also participated in summer training camps sponsored by the Blue Sox. The team developed these camps to encourage South Bend girls who wished to play baseball but had no opportunities at their schools. She had many chances to play first base and decided she would do that rather than pitch as she had originally planned. When she turned 16, she was invited to a tryout and made the Blue Sox roster, even though she was still in high school.In 1950, Wiley was allocated to the Chicago Colleens rookie training team to acquire more experience and better professional quality. She hit a .289 average for them before joining South Bend midway through the season. Best known for her fielding skills, she shared duties at first base with Dorothy Mueller. Wiley managed only 13 hits in 97 at-bats for a measly .134 average in 40 games, as she recognized in an interview with these words: She was a better batter than I was.She improved to .221 in the Sox 1951 season, while becoming a regular at the first sack when Mueller was pitching. She also posted career numbers in games played (70), at-bats (181) and hits (40), while driving in 13 runs and scoring 11 times. With Karl Winsch at the helm, South Bend won both the pennant and the champion title for the first time in league history.Early in the 1952 season, Wiley suffered a knee injury that sidelined her for most of the year. She was used sparingly after recovering, until she had a clash with manager Winsch toward the end of the season when he disciplined her teammate Charlene Pryer for not going in to pinch-run quickly when asked. Winsch felt Wiley was insubordinate and suspended her for 30 days. Then Janet decided she would not go back to the team. I was so angry, I wouldn't play for him anyway, she explained. The league gave her an all-out release from her contract and she returned home to South Bend. A short time later, five other players walked out in protest, leaving Winsch's team short-handed for the rest of the season.Nevertheless, Wiley was signed by the Rockford Peaches before the 1953 season. She played in just 33 games because recurrent knee ailments.Wiley left the league behind and married Donald L. Sears in 1955. The couple raised six children, three boys and three girls in the Michiana area centered on South Bend. She always thought that her experience in the league helped her as a mother. It helped me to encourage our girls to be whatever they wanted to be and the boys to respect them for it, she proudly explained.After her baseball days, Janet coached junior softball for ten years, attended AAGPBL Players Association reunions, and enjoyed woodworking and gardening. Besides this, she stayed in her hometown and watched over her nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.Since 1988 she is part of Women in Baseball, a permanent display based at the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York, which was unveiled to honor the entire All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.

Janet Wiley Sears died in South Bend, Indiana, at the age of 76. She is buried at Southlawn Cemetery in Centre Township, Indiana.

Kalamazoo Lassies

The Kalamazoo Lassies were a team who played from 1950 through 1954 in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. The team represented Kalamazoo, Michigan. Home games were initially played at Lindstrom Field, but later games were played at the Catholic Athletic Association Field, now the Soisson-Rapacz field. Kalamazoo uniforms were white (home) and gold (away) with dark green numbers, belt, socks, and cap.

Mary Froning

Mary Froning [O'Meara] (August 26, 1934 – November 2, 2014) was an outfielder who played from 1951 through 1954 in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. Listed at 5 ft 3 in (1.60 m), 118 lb., she batted and threw right-handed.A strong-armed outfielder and speedy base runner, Mary Froning played on two championship teams during the last four years of the league.

Muskegon Lassies

The Muskegon Lassies were one of the expansion teams of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League in the 1946 season, representing Muskegon, Michigan. The team played their home games at Marsh Field.

The Lassies posted a 46-66 record in their first year, and placed sixth in the eight-team league. They improved to 69-43 in 1947, to win a close pennant race with the Grand Rapids Chicks. Muskegon was led by OF/P Doris Sams, who ranked in several offensive categories and also collected 11 victories, including a perfect game, good enough to win the Most Valuable Player Award. Notably, the team counted with three of the top four pitchers in earned run average, Sams (0.98), Amy Irene Applegren (1.06) and Nancy Warren (1.13), but lost to the Racine Belles in the best-of-five, first-round matchup 3-1.

Muskegon went 66-57 in 1948 to gain a playoff berth, but lost to the Fort Wayne Daisies in the first round, three to zero games.

The team dropped to 46-66 in 1949 but was able to reach the playoffs for the third consecutive year. Muskegon disposed of the Kenosha Comets in the first round, 3-1, being swept by the South Bend Blue Sox in the semifinals, 3-0.

1950 became a nightmare for Muskegon, after registering the worst record in the league (36-73) and a relocation during the midseason to Kalamazoo, Michigan, where the team was renamed the Kalamazoo Lassies.

Pryer

Pryer is a surname. Notable people with the name Pryer include:

Barry Pryer (1925–2007), British cricketer

Charlene Pryer (1921–1999), American baseball player

Kathryn Pryer (born 1990), Australian footballer

William Burgess Pryer, (1843–1899) British businessman and founder of Sandakan, British North Borneo

South Bend Blue Sox

The South Bend Blue Sox was a women's professional baseball team who played from 1943 through 1954 in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. A founding member, the team represented South Bend, Indiana, and played their home games at Bendix Field (1943–1945) and Playland Park (1946–1954).

The Blue Sox was one of two teams to play in every AAGPBL season without relocating, the other being the Rockford Peaches. Often a second-division team, they appeared in six playoff series and won two league titles.

In the 1943 inaugural season, The Blue Sox finished in third place with a 51–40 mark, only .001 percentage point behind second place Kenosha Comets. Together, pitchers Margaret Berger and Doris Barr threw 79 of the 91 games played by the Sox. Berger was credited with 25 wins and Barr with 15, while Berger posted her greatest triumph in a 13-inning match, which she won 1–0.

The next three years, South Bend finished 64–55 (1944), 49–60 (1945), 70–42 (1946), 57–54 (1947) and 57–59 (1948). After falling in their playoff intents, in the 1949 season the team posted the best record in with a 75–36 mark. That year they were swept in the playoffs, 4-to-0, by Rockford, after getting a first-round bye along with them. The South Bend club went on to win their next four playoffs in claiming back-to-back championship titles in 1951 and 1952. After that, the Blue Sox finished in last place both in the 1953 and 1954 seasons.

Apart from the aforementioned Barr and Berger, the South Bend included talented players as Mary Baker (C), Jean Faut (P) Betsy Jochum (OF/1B), Elizabeth Mahon (OF), Betty Whiting (IF), and Dottie Schroeder (SS), who played with four teams to become the only girl to play through the 12 years of existence of the circuit.

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