Channel 9 (Microsoft)

Channel 9 is a Microsoft community site for Microsoft customers created in 2004.[1] It hosts video channels, discussions,[2] podcasts, screencasts and interviews.

Channel 9, launched in 2004 when Microsoft's corporate reputation was at a low,[3] was the company's first blog. It was named after the United Airlines audio channel that lets airplane passengers listen in on unfiltered conversation in the cockpit, to reflect its strategy of publishing conversations among Microsoft developers, rather than its chairman Bill Gates who had previously been the "face" of Microsoft.[3] This made it an inexpensive alternative to Microsoft's Professional Developers Conference, then the main public platform where customers and outside developers could speak to Microsoft employees without the intervention of the company's PR department.[4]

The Channel 9 team have produced interviews with Bill Gates, Erik Meijer and Mark Russinovich.

Channel 9 formerly featured a wiki based on Microsoft's own FlexWiki. The wiki had been used to provide ad hoc feedback to various Microsoft teams such as the Internet Explorer team[5] as well as for teams such as Patterns & Practices to promote discussion,[6] although some teams have migrated to CodePlex.

Channel 9
Microsoft Channel 9 logo
Microsoft Channel 9 screenshot
Channel 9 homepage
Type of site
Video channel, blogging, podcasting, screencasting, forum
Available inEnglish
Created byMicrosoft
Websitechannel9.msdn.com
RegistrationOptional
LaunchedApril, 2004
Current statusActive

References

  1. ^ "About Channel 9". Retrieved 2008-07-03.
  2. ^ "New meeting place | Coffeehouse | Forums | Channel 9". channel9.msdn.com. Retrieved 2017-04-18.
  3. ^ a b Gambetti, Rossella; Quigley, Stephen (2012). Managing Corporate Communication: A Cross-Cultural Approach. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 197.
  4. ^ Ratcliffe, Mitch; Mack, Steve (2008). Podcasting Bible. John Wiley & Sons. p. 506.
  5. ^ "Internet Explorer Feedback". Channel9 Wiki.
  6. ^ "patternsandpractices". Retrieved 2008-07-03.

External links

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