Chad Morton

Chad Akio Morton (born April 4, 1977) is a former American football running back and kick/punt returner in the National Football League. He was drafted from USC late in the fifth round of the 2000 NFL Draft by the New Orleans Saints. After a standout rookie year with the Saints, Morton played five more years between stints with the New York Jets, the Washington Redskins, and the New York Giants.

Morton was part of the Green Bay Packers coaching staff during the Packers' 2010-'11 championship year. He is currently on the Seattle Seahawks' coaching staff as a special teams assistant.

Chad Morton
Seattle Seahawks
Position:Running backs coach
Personal information
Born:April 4, 1977 (age 42)
Torrance, California
Career information
High school:Torrance (CA) South
College:USC
NFL Draft:2000 / Round: 5 / Pick: 166
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing attempts:89
Rushing yards:382
Receptions:48
Receiving yards:419
Return yards:6,832
Total touchdowns:5
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

High school years

Morton attended South High School in Torrance, California, where he was a letterman in football.

College career

Morton was a running back for the University of Southern California Trojans in the late-1990s. A notable moment in Morton's college football career was in 1999, when he guaranteed a USC victory prior to a game against the UCLA who carried an eight-game winning streak against the Trojans. Morton ran for 143 yards in a USC victory. In 2010, it was named by ESPN as the fourth biggest moment in the USC-UCLA football rivalry.[1]

Professional career

Drafted 166th overall (the fifth round) of the 2000 NFL Draft by the New Orleans Saints, Morton became one of very few rookie running backs in Saints history to get significant playing time (16 games) and make an impact on offense and as a kick returner his first year in the pros. He contributed a career-best receiving year 213 yards on 30 catches (7.1 yards per reception), plus 136 yards rushing, and 1,029 yards from 44 kick returns[2] to the Saints' successful, 10-6 NFC West title-winning 2000 season. Morton's postseason contributions were especially crucial to the 2000 Saints. Following the New Orleans Saints' first ever playoff win, they hosted the Minnesota Vikings for the divisional round game, and Morton set the record for most receptions in a single playoff game by a rookie[3] while tying the playoff game record for most receptions by a player, with 13[4] in the ultimately losing effort against the Vikings.

Morton's career-best year at kick returner came with the 2002 New York Jets, as he earned .1,509 yards and two touchdowns[2] (both TDs in a single game) returning kickoffs for Herman Edwards' Jets squad, which won the AFC East title that year and ran away with a blowout win in the first round of the playoffs before falling in the divisional round to the ultimate AFC Championship winners, the Raiders.

He was a first alternate to the 2005 Pro Bowl as a kick returner.

His last year playing football was 2006 with the New York Giants, as he suffered a career-ending ACL tear in Week 16 while covering a punt. On February 13, 2007, he was released by the Giants.

Morton joined the Green Bay Packers in 2009 as the team’s coaching administrator, and he was promoted to assistant special teams coach in February 2010.[5] Morton assisted the Pack's 2010 special teams units that ultimately won championship rings in Super Bowl XLV. With a coaching staff shakeup following the Packers' 2013 season, he left Green Bay.[5]

He is currently with the Seattle Seahawks as a running backs coach.[6]

NFL records

  • Most kickoff return touchdowns in a single game: 2 (2002 vs Buffalo Bills) (tied with 9 others)
  • Longest overtime kickoff returned for a touchdown: 96 (2002 vs Buffalo Bills)
  • Most receptions in a playoff game by a rookie: 13 (2000)[4]
  • Most receptions in a playoff game: 13 (2000) (tied with 3 others)[4]

Personal life

Chad Morton is of mixed ethnicity, African American and Japanese. He is married to Tamra Morton. He is the younger brother of running back Michael Morton and wide receiver Johnnie Morton.

References

  1. ^ Mark Saxton (December 2, 2010). "USC rivalry moment No. 4: Chad Morton's guarantee". ESPN. Retrieved November 8, 2011.
  2. ^ a b http://www.nfl.com/player/chadmorton/2504207/careerstats NFL Players: Chad Morton - Career Stats
  3. ^ NFL Playoff Records: Receptions - none of the other players listed tied with Morton at 13 receptions were in their rookie year.
  4. ^ a b c NFL Playoff Records: Individual - Receiving
  5. ^ a b Vandermause, Mike (February 3, 2014). "Packers won't bring back special teams assistant Morton". Green Bay Press-Gazette. Retrieved January 6, 2015.
  6. ^ "Seahawks Announce 2018 Coaching Staff". Seahawks.com. Retrieved June 19, 2018.
1996 USC Trojans football team

The 1996 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1996 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their 11th and final year under head coach John Robinson, the Trojans compiled a 6–6 record (3–5 against conference opponents), finished in a five-way tie for fifth place in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) championship, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 325 to 267.Quarterback Brad Otton led the team in passing, completing 196 of 370 passes for 2,649 yards with 20 touchdowns and 10 interceptions. LaVale Woods led the team in rushing with 119 carries for 601 yards and seven touchdowns. Chris Miller led the team in receiving with 43 catches for 793 yards and five touchdowns.

1997 USC Trojans football team

The 1997 USC Trojans football team (variously "Trojans" or "USC") represented the University of Southern California during the 1997 NCAA Division I-A football season, finishing with a 6–5 record and tied for fifth place in the Pacific-10 Conference with a 4–4 conference record; despite a qualifying record, the Trojans were not invited to a bowl game. The team was coached by John Robinson, in his second stint as head coach of the Trojans, and played their home games at the Los Angeles Coliseum.

1998 Oregon Ducks football team

The 1998 Oregon Ducks football team represented the University of Oregon during the 1998 NCAA Division I-A football season. They were led by head coach Mike Bellotti, who was in his 4th season as head coach of the Ducks. They played their home games at Autzen Stadium in Eugene, Oregon and participated as members of the Pacific-10 Conference.

1998 USC Trojans football team

The 1998 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1998 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their first year under head coach Paul Hackett, the Trojans compiled an 8-5 record (5–3 against conference opponents), finished in a tie for third place in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10), and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 346 to 241.This was Paul Hackett's inaugural year as head coach as the Trojans head coach as well as his only winning season and bowl appearance with the team. It was also the Trojans' 75th anniversary playing at the Coliseum.

After three wins, including an opener against Purdue in the Pigskin Classic, USC was ranked as high as 18 in the AP Poll, but lost two of its next three and dropped out of the rankings permanently.

During halftime of the game against UCLA, 91-year-old USC "Super Fan" Giles Pellerin died while watching his 797th consecutive USC football game.Quarterback Carson Palmer led the team in passing, completing 130 of 235 passes for 1,755 yards with seven touchdowns and six interceptions. Chad Morton led the team in rushing with 199 carries for 985 yards and six touchdowns. R. Jay Soward led the team in receiving yards with 44 catches for 679 yards and six touchdowns; Billy Miller also had 49 catches for 623 yards and six touchdowns.

1999 Oregon Ducks football team

The 1999 Oregon Ducks football team represented the University of Oregon during the 1999 NCAA Division I-A football season. They were led by head coach Mike Bellotti, who was in his 5th season as head coach of the Ducks. They played their home games at Autzen Stadium in Eugene, Oregon and participated as members of the Pacific-10 Conference.

1999 USC Trojans football team

The 1999 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1999 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their second year under head coach Paul Hackett, the Trojans compiled a 6-6 record (3–5 against conference opponents), finished in a tie for sixth place in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10), and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 348 to 278.Quarterback Mike Van Raaphorst led the team in passing, completing 139 of 258 passes for 1,758 yards with eight touchdowns and nine interceptions. Chad Morton led the team in rushing with 262 carries for 1,141 yards and 15 touchdowns. Kareem Kelly led the team in receiving yards with 54 catches for 902 yards and four touchdowns.

2000 New Orleans Saints season

The 2000 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 34th season in the National Football League and the 25th to host games at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. The Saints were looking to improve on their 3–13 finish from a year earlier under new head coach Jim Haslett. Not only did the Saints do so, but they finished with a 10–6 record to win the NFC West and advanced to the playoffs for the first time since 1992. They also won their first ever playoff game in franchise history by defeating the defending Super Bowl champion St. Louis Rams in the Wild Card round. The Saints went no further, though, as they lost to the Minnesota Vikings in the next round.

This was the only time the Saints made the playoffs under Haslett. For the next four seasons, the Saints fell out of contention. They would not return to the playoffs until 2006.

New wide receiver Joe Horn, quickly emerged as a star, catching 94 passes for 1,340 and 9 touchdowns, and he was selected to the Pro Bowl after the season.

2001 New York Jets season

The 2001 New York Jets season was the franchise's 32nd season in the National Football League (NFL), the 42nd season overall, and the first under new head coach Herman Edwards. The team improved upon its 9–7 record from 2000 and the Jets finished 10–6 and qualified for the final Wild Card position in the American Football Conference. They lost in the Wild Card round to the Oakland Raiders, with the score of 38–24.

2002 New York Jets season

The 2002 New York Jets season was the franchise's 33rd season in the National Football League (NFL), the 43rd season overall, and the second under head coach Herman Edwards. The team tried to improve upon its 10–6 record from 2001 but failed to do so after 2–5 start. However The Jets recovered and finished 9–7 and won their second AFC East division title.

After a heartbreaking 24–21 week 8 loss to the Cleveland Browns at the Meadowlands, head coach Herman Edwards gave his famous “You play to win the game" rant in the post-game press conference. The mid-season debut of quarterback Chad Pennington helped lead the Jets to a 7–2 record down the stretch. After posting a stunning rout of the Indianapolis Colts by a score of 41–0 at the Meadowlands in the Wild Card round of the playoffs, they lost for the second year in a row to the Oakland Raiders, 30–10 in the Divisional round.

2003 Washington Redskins season

The 2003 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 72nd season in the National Football League. The team failed to improve on their 7–9 record from 2002, dropping to 5-11 and missing the playoffs for the fourth straight year. This was their worst season since 1994.This was the first season since 1982 that the Redskins did not have cornerback Darrell Green, who retired after the 2002 season. Owing to different formulas for intraconference scheduling used by the NFL before 2002, it was the first time since 1994 that the Redskins played the Atlanta Falcons and the first time ever the Redskins had played at the Georgia Dome, which opened in 1992.

Following the season, defensive tackle Bruce Smith retired after 19 seasons in the NFL, Pro Bowl defensive back Champ Bailey would be traded to the Denver Broncos and head coach Steve Spurrier left after spending only two seasons coaching the Redskins.

2004 Washington Redskins season

The 2004 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 73rd season in the National Football League.

They improved on their 5–11 record from 2003 to 6-10, but missed the playoffs. It was also the season of Joe Gibbs’ return as head coach after coming out of retirement. The team acquired running back Clinton Portis in a trade that sent Champ Bailey to the Denver Broncos in the 2004 off-season.

2006 New York Giants season

The 2006 New York Giants season was the franchise's 82nd season in the National Football League.

The season began with the team trying to improve on their 11–5 record in 2005, which saw them win the NFC East. They did not win the NFC East or improve on that record, falling to 8–8 on the season after starting 6–2. However, head coach Tom Coughlin became the first Giants head coach since Bill Parcells to lead the team to consecutive playoff berths as the team qualified as one of two NFC wild card teams. This was Tiki Barber's final season in the NFL.

2019 Seattle Seahawks season

The 2019 Seattle Seahawks season will be the franchise's 44th season in the National Football League and the tenth under head coach Pete Carroll. It will also mark their first full season since 1996 without the ownership of Paul Allen, who died during the 2018 season.

Earthwind Moreland

Earthwind C. Moreland (born June 13, 1977 in Atlanta, Georgia) is a former National Football League cornerback for the New England Patriots and Arena Football League cornerback/wide receiver for the Las Vegas Gladiators. He was drafted by Team Alabama of the AAFL in 2008.

Jemal Singleton

Jemal Singleton (December 7, 1975) is an American football coach who is the running backs coach for the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League (NFL). He previously was the running backs coach for the Indianapolis Colts. He was a coach for numerous college football teams before that.

Johnnie Morton

Johnnie James Morton Jr. (born October 7, 1971) is a former American football wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL) during the 1990s and 2000s. He played college football for the University of Southern California (USC), and was recognized as an All-American in 1993. Originally drafted by the Detroit Lions in the first round in the 1994 NFL Draft, he also played professionally for the Kansas City Chiefs and San Francisco 49ers of the NFL. Morton also had a brief career in mixed martial arts fighting in 2007.

Rod Gardner

Roderick F. Gardner (born October 26, 1977 in Jacksonville, Florida) is a former American college and professional football player who was a wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL) for five seasons.

Willie Ponder

Willie Columbus Ponder (born February 14, 1980 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is a former professional American football player who played wide receiver for 3 seasons for the New York Giants and one season with Seattle Seahawks and St. Louis Rams.

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