Chad Greenway

Chad Greenway (born January 12, 1983) is a former American football linebacker who spent his entire 11-year career with the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Iowa, and was drafted by the Vikings in the first round of the 2006 NFL Draft.

Chad Greenway
refer to caption
Greenway at the 2013 Pro Bowl
No. 52
Position:Linebacker
Personal information
Born:January 12, 1983 (age 36)
Mount Vernon, South Dakota
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:242 lb (110 kg)
Career information
High school:Mount Vernon (SD)
College:Iowa
NFL Draft:2006 / Round: 1 / Pick: 17
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Total tackles:1,101
Sacks:18.0
Forced fumbles:8
Fumble recoveries:11
Interceptions:11
Defensive touchdowns:2
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Greenway attended Mount Vernon High School in Mount Vernon, South Dakota, where he was a three-time South Dakota All-state performer, earning first team honors as a junior and senior and third team honors as a sophomore. He was named Gatorade Football Player of the Year as a senior in 2001.[1] also Argus Leader and Sports Max Player of the Year. He also earned first team All-conference honors for three straight seasons, as well as MVP honors. He played quarterback and free safety and returned punts and kickoffs, helping prep team win two consecutive state titles as a junior and senior. His career totals include 364 rushing attempts for 3,118 yards and 171-290 passes for 2,572 yards. On defense, he recorded 407 tackles and 23 interceptions. As a senior, he completed 62-114 passes for 1,147 yards and rushed for 1,320 yards at quarterback, and also added 132 tackles and four interceptions at safety. Greenway also lettered in basketball, baseball and track & field at Mount Vernon.[2]

College career

Greenway attended the University of Iowa, and played for the Iowa Hawkeyes football team from 2002 to 2005. He redshirted his freshman season in 2001. As a redshirt freshman in 2002, he suffered a knee injury that required surgery and did not play in the first four games. In 2003, he started at outside linebacker in all 13 games and was named second-team All-Big Ten. Greenway was named the Big Ten Conference co-Defensive Player of the Week vs. Arizona State, and won the Hustle Team Award at Iowa.

In 2004, he was named a first-team All-American by Pro Football Weekly, a second-team All-American by CNNSI.com, and a third team All-American by CollegeSportsReport.com. Within the conference, Greenway was named first team All-Big Ten and selected as a first-team all-Big Ten player by Collegefootballnews.com. Greenway was selected by the team as Iowa's Special Teams Player of the Year, won the Hustle Team Award for defense, and was one of three juniors selected to the team Leadership Council for 2004 season.

In 2005, Greenway was named preseason All-America by The Sporting News, NationalChamps.net, and was named to the preseason honorable mention All-America squad selected by NationalChamps.net. He was ranked as the No. 2 outside linebacker by The Sporting News, and named to the Bronko Nagurski and Lott Trophy watch lists.

Professional career

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad BP
6 ft 3 in
(1.91 m)
242 lb
(110 kg)
4.60 s 1.66 s 2.75 s 4.22 s 7.01 s 38 in
(0.97 m)
10 ft 0 in
(3.05 m)
19 reps
All values from NFL Combine/Iowa's Pro Day[3]

Minnesota Vikings

The Minnesota Vikings selected Greenway in the first round (17th overall) of the 2006 NFL Draft. Greenway was the third linebacker drafted in 2006, behind Ohio State's A. J. Hawk (fifth overall) and Florida State's Ernie Sims (ninth overall).

2006

On July 23, 2006, the Minnesota Vikings signed Greenway to a five-year, $10.75 million contract that includes $6.14 million guaranteed.[4][5]

Throughout training camp, Greenway competed to be a starting outside linebacker against E. J. Henderson and Ben Leber.[6] On August 14, 2006, Greenway tore his ACL in his left leg while covering a kickoff in the first quarter of the Vikings' 16–13 loss to the Oakland Raiders in their first preseason game.[7] He subsequently missed his entire rookie season in 2006.[8]

2007

The Minnesota Vikings hired Leslie Frazier as their new defensive coordinator after Mike Tomlin accepted the head coaching position with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Greenway entered training camp slated as a starting outside linebacker.[9] Head coach Brad Childress named Greenway the starting weakside linebacker to begin the regular season, alongside Ben Leber and middle linebacker E. J. Henderson.[10]

He made his professional regular season debut and first career start in the Minnesota Vikings' season-opener against the Atlanta Falcons and recorded ten combined tackles (four solo) in their 24–3 victory. On November 18, 2007, he recorded seven combined tackles, a season-high two pass deflections, and made his first career interception off a pass by quarterback Daunte Culpepper during a 29–22 victory against the Oakland Raiders in Week 11.[11] In Week 12, Greenway made three solo tackles, a pass deflection, and returned an interception for his first career touchdown in the Vikings' 41–17 win at the New York Giants. Greenway intercepted a pass by Giants' quarterback Eli Manning and returned it for a 37-yard touchdown in the fourth quarter.[12] On December 9, 2007, he collected a season-high 13 combined tackles (eight solo) during a 27–7 victory at the San Francisco 49ers in Week 14. Greenway started all 16 games in 2007 and recorded 105 combined tackles (78 solo), four pass deflections, two forced fumbles, two interceptions, and one touchdown.[13]

2008

Head coach Brad Childress retained Greenway and Ben Leber as the starting outside linebackers in 2008, along with middle linebacker E. J. Henderson.[14] On September 21, 2008, Greenway recorded nine combined tackles and made his first career sack on quarterback Jake Delhomme during a 20–10 win against the Carolina Panthers in Week 3. In Week 11, he collected a season-high 16 solo tackles, made a pass deflection, and a sack in the Vikings' 13–10 loss at the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. In Week 15, Greenway recorded seven combined tackles, a season-high three pass deflections, and a sack in a 35–14 win at the Arizona Cardinals.[15] Greenway finished the 2008 season with 115 combined tackles (78 solo), a career-high 5.5 sacks, and five pass deflections in 16 games and 15 starts.[13]

The Minnesota Vikings finished first in the NFC North with a 10–6 record. On January 4, 2009, Greenway recorded ten combined tackles (nine solo) during the Vikings' 26–14 loss against the Philadelphia Eagles in the NFC Wildcard Game.[15]

2009

On September 20, 2009, Greenway recorded four combined tackles, deflected two passes, and made a career-high two interceptions during a 27–13 victory at the Detroit Lions in Week 2. Greenway made both interceptions off pass attempts by Lions' quarterback Matthew Stafford.[16] In Week 8, he collected a season-high 11 combined tackles (ten solo) and broke up one pass in the Vikings' 38–26 win at the Green Bay Packers.[17] He started all 16 games in 2009 and recorded 99 combined tackles (80 solo), a career-high six pass deflections, and three interceptions.[13]

The Minnesota Vikings finished first in the NFC North with a 12–4 record and earned a first round bye. On January 17, 2010, he recorded six combined tackles, a pass deflection, and a sack in a 34–3 win against the Dallas Cowboys in the NFC Divisional Round. On January 24, 2010, Greenway made eight combined tackles during a 31–28 loss at the New Orleans Saints in the NFC Championship Game.[17]

2010

Head coach Brad Childress retained Greenway, Ben Leber, and E.J. Henderson as the starting linebackers for the fourth consecutive season.[18] He started in the Minnesota Vikings' season-opener at the New Orleans Saints and collected a season-high 12 combined tackles (nine solo) in their 14–9 loss.[19] On October 24, 2010, he tied his season-high of 12 combined tackles (ten solo) in the Vikings' 28–24 loss at the Green Bay Packers in Week 7.[19] On November 22, 2010, the Minnesota Vikings fired head coach Brad Childress after they lost 31–3 to the Green Bay Packers and fell to a 3–7 record. Defensive coordinator Leslie Frazier was promoted to interim head coach for the remainder of the season.[20] Greenway started in all 16 games in 2010 and recorded 144 combined tackles (109 solo), three interceptions, one pass deflection, a forced fumble, and one fumble recovery.[13]

2011

On February 21, 2011, the Minnesota Vikings exercised their franchise player on Greenway.[21] On March 1, 2011, Greenway signed his one-year, $10.09 million franchise tag.[22] Linebackers coach Fred Pagac was promoted to defensive coordinator and retained Greenway as the starting weakside linebacker. Head coach Leslie Frazier named Greenway and Erin Henderson the starting outside linebackers to begin the regular season in 2011, along with middle linebacker E. J. Henderson.[23] On September 5, 2011, the Minnesota Vikings signed Greenway to a five-year, $41 million contract that includes $20 million guaranteed.[24][4][5]

On November 20, 2011, Greenway recorded 15 combined tackles (seven solo) and one sack during a 27–21 loss to the Oakland Raiders in Week 11. In Week 12, he collected a season-high 16 combined tackles (seven solo) in the Vikings' 24-14 loss at the Atlanta Falcons. On December 24, 2011, Greenway tied his season-high of 16 combined tackles (four solo) and broke up a pass during a 33–26 victory at the Washington Redskins in Week 16.[25] He started all 16 games in 2011 and recorded a career-high 154 combined tackles (89 solo), two pass deflections, and two sacks.[13] On January 9, 2012, it was announced that Greenway would play in the 2012 Pro Bowl as an replacement for Lance Briggs who was unable to participate due to an injury. This became Greenway's first Pro Bowl selection.[26]

2012

On January 14, 2012, the Minnesota Vikings announced the decision to relieve Fred Pagac of his duties as defensive coordinator and demote him to linebackers coach after the defense was ranked 21st in 2011. They also ranked 26th in pass defense and 11th in run defense in 2011.[27] Head coach Leslie Frazier named Greenway the starting weakside linebacker to start the regular season, along with Erin Henderson and middle linebacker Jasper Brinkley.[28]

He started in the Minnesota Vikings' season-opener against the Jacksonville Jaguars and recorded 13 combined tackles (nine solo) and a season-high two pass deflections in their 26–23 victory.[29] On October 5, 2012, Greenway was fined $21,000 for unnecessary roughness after he struck wide receiver Calvin Johnson in the head and neck area.[30] On November 11, 2012, he recorded five combined tackles, deflected a pass, and made an interception during a 34–24 win against the Detroit Lions in Week 10. In Week 13, Greenway collected a season-high 16 combined tackles (13 solo) during the Vikings' 23–14 loss at the Green Bay Packers.[29] Greenway started in all 16 games in 2012 and recorded 148 combined tackles (98 solo), four pass deflections, three sacks, and an interception.[13]

The Minnesota Vikings finished second in the NFC North with a 10–6 record and earned a wildcard berth. On January 5, 2013, Greenway recorded 11 combined tackles (ten solo) as the Vikings lost 24–10 at the Green Bay Packers in the NFC Wildcard Game.[29] On January 10, 2013, it was announced that Greenway was selected to play in the 2013 Pro Bowl as a replacement for DeMarcus Ware who was unable to play due to an injury.[31]

2013

Defensive coordinator Alan Williams retained Greenway as the starting weakside linebacker, along with Marvin Mitchell and middle linebacker Erin Henderson.[32] On September 29, 2013, Greenway collected a season-high ten solo tackles, deflected a pass, made a sack, and made an interception during a 34–27 victory against the Pittsburgh Steelers in their Week 4 game in London. Greenway intercepted a pass by Steelers' quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, that was originally intended for wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders, in the third quarter.[33] In Week 10, he collected a season-high 16 combined tackles (five solo) in the Vikings' 34–27 win against the Washington Redskins.[34] He started all 16 games and recorded 134 combined tackles (83 solo), four pass deflections, three interceptions, and three sacks.[13] On December 30, 2013, the Minnesota Vikings fired head coach Leslie Frazier after they finished the season with a 5–10–1 record.[35]

2014-2017

On March 31, 2016, Greenway announced that he is returning for an eleventh season with the Vikings and that the upcoming season would be his last.

On March 6, 2017, Greenway officially announced his retirement from the National Football League.[36]

NFL statistics

Year Team GP COMB TOTAL AST SACK FF FR FR YDS INT IR YDS AVG IR LNG TD PD
2007 MIN 16 105 78 27 0.0 2 4 0 2 39 20 37 1 4
2008 MIN 16 115 86 29 5.5 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5
2009 MIN 16 99 80 19 0.0 1 3 0 3 49 16 36 0 6
2010 MIN 16 144 109 35 1.0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
2011 MIN 16 154 89 65 2.0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
2012 MIN 16 148 98 50 3.0 0 2 0 1 3 3 3 0 4
2013 MIN 16 134 83 51 3.0 0 0 0 3 23 8 23 0 4
2014 MIN 12 93 56 37 1.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
2015 MIN 16 68 55 13 2.5 0 0 0 1 91 91 91 1 1
2016 MIN 16 41 26 15 0.0 0 0 0 1 17 17.0 17 0 1
Career 156 1,101 760 341 18.0 8 11 0 11 222 20.2 91 2 32

[37]

Personal

Greenway married in July 2006 to Jennifer Capista, a former track and field athlete at Iowa. The couple has four daughters.[38]

In 2008, Greenway established his charitable foundation, Chad Greenway’s Lead The Way Foundation, with the primary focus of providing seriously ill and physically challenged children throughout the Twin Cities with daily support and life-changing experiences. The mission of Chad Greenway’s Lead The Way Foundation is to enrich the lives of individuals and families in need.[39]

Chad Greenway's Lead the Way Foundation has three signature programs. Through these programs, Chad's Lead the Way Foundation has touched the lives of nearly 375,000 people in the Twin Cities.[40] These programs are:

  1. TendHER Heart Luncheon The TendHER Heart Luncheon is hosted each year to honor mothers of chronically and critically ill children for the sacrifices they make in caring for their ill child. The brunch provides these women with the opportunity to "take a minute" for themselves and enjoy each other's company and support. The mothers are served gourmet breakfast and lunch dishes and are sent home with a few special treats to enjoy.[41]
  2. Field of Dreams The Field of Dreams program was established to present critically and chronically ill children and their families with magical memories by fulfilling sports wishes and vacation dreams. The foundation foots the bill for a day of fun activities, tickets and food at a nice getaway like Kalahari or Mall of America.[42]
    Chad's Locker at Hutchinson Health
    7th Chad’s Locker - Hutchinson Health Chad’s Locker is an electronic hub that provides access to iPads, laptops, Leap Frog Readers, DVDs, games and other electronics to patients and their families. In addition to the entertainment devices, Chad provided toys, coloring supplies, dolls, action figures, and board games.
  3. Chad's Locker Chad's Locker provides patients and their families access to notebook computers, movies and video game systems to occupy their time during their hospital stay.[43] March 2012, Chad launched his first locker at the University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital. October 2012, Chad launched his second locker at Children's Minneapolis Hospital located in the Geek Squad Precinct.[44] March 2013, Chad launched his third locker at Hudson Hospital and Clinics. October 2013, Chad launched his fourth locker at Children's Hospitals & Clinics of Minnesota St. Paul.[45] April 2014, Chad launched his fifth locker at Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare in the Ronald McDonald Family Room.[46] April 2015, Chad launched his sixth locker in Sioux Falls, South Dakota at Sanford Children's Hospital.[47] October 2015 - Chad launched his seventh locker at Hutchinson Health. [48]
Chad's Locker at Hutchinson Health
7th Chad’s Locker - Hutchinson Health Chad’s Locker is an electronic hub that provides access to iPads, laptops, Leap Frog Readers, DVDs, games and other electronics to patients and their families. In addition to the entertainment devices, Chad provided toys, coloring supplies, dolls, action figures, and board games.

In the 2016 season, Greenway was named the Vikings' Community Man-of-the-Year for the consecutive year.[49]

On December 2, 2015, Greenway was named the Minnesota Vikings' nominee for the Walter Payton Man of the Year award.[50]

References

  1. ^ http://www.gatorade.com/poy/winners.aspx
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on July 8, 2015. Retrieved March 8, 2015.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "Chad Greenway, DS #2 OLB, Iowa". draftscout.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  4. ^ a b "Spotrac.com: Chad Greenway contract". spotrac.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  5. ^ a b "Overthecap.com: Chad Greenway contract". overthecap.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  6. ^ Yotter, Tim (July 17, 2006). "Defensive Unit-By-Unit Analysis". 247sports.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  7. ^ Yotter, Tim (August 15, 2006). "Greenway Out for Season". 247sports.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  8. ^ Drehs, Wayne (December 14, 2006). "An excruciating waiting game". ESPN.com. Retrieved August 14, 2018.
  9. ^ Kidd, Keith (April 12, 2007). "On the clock: Minnesota Vikings". ESPN.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  10. ^ "Ourlads.com: Minnesota Vikings Depth Chart: 09/02/2007". Ourlads.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  11. ^ "NFL Game Center: Week 11-2007: Oakland Raiders @ Minnesota Vikings". NFL.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  12. ^ "NFL Game Center: Week 12-2007: Minnesota Vikings @ New York Giants". NFL.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g "NFL Player stats: Chad Greenway (2007)". NFL.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  14. ^ "Ourlads.com: Minnesota Vikings Depth Chart: 08/31/2008". Ourlads.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  15. ^ a b "NFL Player stats: Chad Greenway (2008)". NFL.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  16. ^ "NFL Game Center: Week 2-2009: Minnesota Vikings @ Detroit Lions". NFL.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  17. ^ a b "NFL Player stats: Chad Greenway (2009)". NFL.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  18. ^ "Ourlads.com: Minnesota Vikings Depth Chart: 09/05/2010". Ourlads.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  19. ^ a b "NFL Player stats: Chad Greenway (2010)". NFL.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  20. ^ "Vikings fire coach Brad Childress". ESPN.com. November 23, 2010. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  21. ^ "Greenway Designated as Franchise Player". Archived from the original on February 25, 2011. Retrieved February 25, 2011.
  22. ^ "Greenway signs franchise tender". startribune.com. March 1, 2011. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  23. ^ "Ourlads.com: Minnesota Vikings Depth Chart: 09/04/2011". Ourlads.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  24. ^ Martin, Josh (September 5, 2011). "Chad Greenway: LB's Lucrative New Contract Will Cost Vikings' Adrian Peterson". BleacherReport.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  25. ^ "NFL Player stats: Chad Greenway (2011)". NFL.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  26. ^ "Two alternates added to NFC team". ESPN.com. January 9, 2012. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  27. ^ "Fred Pagac out as Vikings defensive coordinator but could coach linebackers". twincities.com. January 14, 2012. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  28. ^ Sargent, Jordan (September 5, 2012). "Vikings Depth Chart: Minnesota Updates Depth Chart As Week 1 Nears". minnesota.sbnation.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  29. ^ a b c "NFL Player stats: Chad Greenway (2012)". NFL.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  30. ^ "Vikings LB Greenway fined $21,000". Fox Sports. October 5, 2012. Retrieved October 6, 2012.
  31. ^ "Chad Greenway, Jermaine Gresham added to Pro Bowl Rosters". NFL.com. January 10, 2013. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  32. ^ "Ourlads.com: Minnesota Vikings Depth Chart: 09/04/2013". Ourlads.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  33. ^ "NFL Game Center: Week 4-2013: Pittsburgh Steelers @ Minnesota Vikings". NFL.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  34. ^ "NFL Player stats: Chad Greenway (2013)". NFL.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  35. ^ Rosenthal, Greg (December 30, 2013). "Leslie Frazier fired as Minnesota Vikings coach". NFL.com. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  36. ^ "Vikings LB Chad Greenway to Announce Retirement". Vikings.com. March 6, 2017.
  37. ^ "Chad Greenway Stats". ESPN. ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved November 6, 2016.
  38. ^ "Chad Greenway welcomes fourth daughter to family". CBSSports.com. Retrieved March 24, 2017.
  39. ^ "Chad Greenway's Lead the Way Foundation Home Page". Chad Greenway’s Lead The Way Foundation. Retrieved August 29, 2016.
  40. ^ "Chad Greenway's Lead The Way Foundation | A Prolanthropy-Managed Organization". Retrieved August 29, 2016.
  41. ^ "Greenway Hosts Over 200 Women at the 6th Annual TendHER Heart Brunch". Retrieved August 29, 2016.
  42. ^ Patrick, Adam (December 4, 2015). "Greenway's 2015 Impact Getting Noticed From Multiple Angles - Vikings Territory". Retrieved August 29, 2016.
  43. ^ "Chad Greenway's Lead The Way Foundation | A Prolanthropy-Managed Organization". Retrieved August 29, 2016.
  44. ^ Young, Lindsey (July 15, 2015). "Chad Greenway Impacts Childrens Hospital". Retrieved August 29, 2016.
  45. ^ "Corporate Partners | Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota". Retrieved August 29, 2016.
  46. ^ "Ronald McDonald House Charities - Upper Midwest". rmhtwincities.org. Retrieved August 29, 2016.
  47. ^ "Chad's Locker". www.sanfordhealth.org. Retrieved August 29, 2016.
  48. ^ "Greenway opens 7th 'Chad's Locker' to help hospital patients". Retrieved August 29, 2016.
  49. ^ Peters, Craig (Dec 7, 2016). "Chad Greenway Named Vikings Community Man of Year". www.vikings.com. Retrieved December 3, 2015.
  50. ^ "Chad Greenway is Vikings' nominee for Walter Payton Man of the Year". Star Tribune. Retrieved December 3, 2015.

External links

2003 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 2003 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen as All-Big Ten Conference players for the 2003 Big Ten Conference football season. The conference recognizes two official All-Big Ten selectors: (1) the Big Ten conference coaches selected separate offensive and defensive units and named first- and second-team players (the "Coaches" team); and (2) a panel of sports writers and broadcasters covering the Big Ten also selected offensive and defensive units and named first- and second-team players (the "Media" team).

2004 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 2004 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen as All-Big Ten Conference players for the 2004 Big Ten Conference football season. The conference recognizes two official All-Big Ten selectors: (1) the Big Ten conference coaches selected separate offensive and defensive units and named first- and second-team players (the "Coaches" team); and (2) a panel of sports writers and broadcasters covering the Big Ten also selected offensive and defensive units and named first- and second-team players (the "Media" team).

2004 College Football All-America Team

The 2004 College Football All-America Team is composed of the following All-American Teams: Associated Press (AP), Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), Walter Camp Football Foundation, The Sporting News, Sports Illustrated, Pro Football Weekly, ESPN, CBS Sports, College Football News, and Rivals.com.

The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions. The original usage of the term All-America seems to have been to such a list selected by football pioneer Walter Camp in the 1890s. The NCAA officially recognizes All-Americans selected by the AP, AFCA, FWAA, SN, and the WCFF to determine Consensus All-Americans.

2005 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 2005 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen as All-Big Ten Conference players for the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season. The conference recognizes two official All-Big Ten selectors: (1) the Big Ten conference coaches selected separate offensive and defensive units and named first- and second-team players (the "Coaches" team); and (2) a panel of sports writers and broadcasters covering the Big Ten also selected offensive and defensive units and named first- and second-team players (the "Media" team).

2005 College Football All-America Team

The 2005 College Football All-America Team is composed of the following All-American Teams: Associated Press, Football Writers Association of America, American Football Coaches Association, Walter Camp Foundation, The Sporting News, Sports Illustrated, Pro Football Weekly, ESPN, CBS Sports, College Football News, and Rivals.com.

The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions. The original usage of the term All-America seems to have been to such a list selected by football pioneer Walter Camp in the 1890s. The NCAA officially recognizes All-Americans selected by the AP, AFCA, FWAA, TSN, and the WCFF to determine Consensus All-Americans.

2005 Iowa Hawkeyes football team

The 2005 Iowa Hawkeyes football team represented the University of Iowa during the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Hawkeyes played their home games at Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City, Iowa and were coached by Kirk Ferentz.

Iowa finished the season 7–5, including a record of 5–3 in the Big Ten Conference. Despite an up-and-down season, the Hawkeyes were invited to a January bowl game in Florida for the fourth consecutive year.

2007 Minnesota Vikings season

The 2007 season was the Minnesota Vikings' 47th in the National Football League. The Vikings' 8–8 record under second-year head coach Brad Childress was an improvement on their 6–10 record in 2006; nonetheless, for the third straight year, the Vikings failed to make the playoffs.

Although they had the worst pass defense in the NFL in 2007, surrendering 4,225 passing yards, the Vikings finished the season with the league's best defense against the run, allowing only 74.1 rushing yards per game, as well as the best rushing offense with running backs Adrian Peterson and Chester Taylor. Peterson was named 2007 Offensive Rookie of the Year for 2007.

2011 Minnesota Vikings season

The 2011 season was the Minnesota Vikings' 51st in the National Football League, and the first full season under head coach Leslie Frazier, who served as the team's interim head coach for the final six games of the 2010 season. The team failed to improve on their 6–10 record from 2010, going 2–6 before their bye week, before being eliminated from playoff contention in week 12 with a 2–9 record. The team also suffered its first six-game losing streak since the 1984 season.

The team started the season with a new starting quarterback, Donovan McNabb, who had enjoyed great success with the Eagles but had a subpar year with the Redskins in 2010. McNabb played respectably, having a passer rating of 82.9 and only turning the ball over twice, but his 1–5 record as starter led to him being benched in favor of rookie Christian Ponder in Week 6, and McNabb was later waived on December 1, 2011. Despite a poor year for the team as a whole, Jared Allen set a franchise record for most sacks in a season with 22. The team led the league in sacks with 50, but also tied a team record for fewest interceptions caught in a season with only eight.

2012 All-Pro Team

There are three 2012 All-Pro Teams—one each named by the Associated Press (AP), Pro Football Writers Association (PFWA), and Sporting News—for performance in the 2012 NFL season. While none of these have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2013 Pro Bowl), they are included (separately) in the NFL Record and Fact Book. Any player selected to any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro."

The AP team, with first- and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of 50 NFL writers; the Sporting News selection process used a panel of 27 NFL coaches and executives, while the PFWA team is chosen by polling its 300+ members.

2012 Minnesota Vikings season

The 2012 season was the Minnesota Vikings' 52nd in the National Football League, as well as their second full season under head coach Leslie Frazier. They looked to improve upon their 3–13 season the year before, and did so after defeating the Tennessee Titans in Week 5; their win over the Houston Texans in Week 16 made this their first winning season since 2009. The Vikings also made the playoffs for the first time since 2009 with a Week 17 win over the Green Bay Packers to give them a 10–6 regular season record, but were defeated by the same opponents in the Wild Card playoff round the following week. Adrian Peterson was named the league's Most Valuable Player after rushing for 2,097 yards, just nine yards short of breaking the single-season record held by Eric Dickerson since 1984.

On May 10, 2012, the Minnesota State Legislature approved a bill for a new stadium for the team that would see a new facility (later named U.S. Bank Stadium) constructed by 2016 and ensure the Vikings' presence in Minneapolis through the year 2046. The bill was signed by Governor Mark Dayton on May 14, and approved by the Minneapolis City Council by a vote of 7–6 on May 25.

2013 Pro Bowl

The 2013 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's sixty-third annual all-star game which featured players from the 2012 season. It took place at 2:30 pm Hawaii–Aleutian Time (UTC−10:00; 7:30 pm Eastern Time) on Sunday, January 27, 2013 at the Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The game was televised nationally by NBC in place of CBS. The game was delayed for 30 minutes due to flash flood warnings.John Fox of the AFC West Denver Broncos led the AFC "home team" against a "visiting" NFC team that was coached by the Green Bay Packers head coach Mike McCarthy of the NFC North. These coaches were selected for coaching the highest seeded team to lose in the Divisional Round of the playoffs, which has been the convention since the 2009 Pro Bowl. Ed Hochuli was the game referee.Players on the winning team (NFC) each earned $50,000, while players on the losing team (AFC) earned $25,000.The Houston Texans and San Francisco 49ers had the most Pro Bowl selections with nine. The Kansas City Chiefs, despite only winning two games, had six selections. Six teams, the Carolina Panthers, Philadelphia Eagles, St. Louis Rams, Tennessee Titans, Jacksonville Jaguars, and San Diego Chargers, had no selections. Three rookie quarterbacks (Andrew Luck, Robert Griffin III, and Russell Wilson) were selected, which is the most in Pro Bowl history.

Ben Gedeon

Benjamin Gedeon (born October 16, 1994) is an American football linebacker for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Michigan. Gedeon was drafted by the Vikings in the fourth round of the 2017 NFL Draft.

Byron "Whizzer" White NFL Man of the Year Award

The Byron "Whizzer" White NFL Man of the Year Award has been awarded by the National Football League Players Association continuously since 1967. The most recent winner, for the 2017 season, is Chris Long of the Philadelphia Eagles. The award honors work in the community as the NFL player who best served his team, community and country in the spirit of Byron "Whizzer" White, who was a Supreme Court justice, professional American football player, naval officer, and humanitarian. Past winners have included Drew Brees, Warrick Dunn, Gale Sayers, Bart Starr, Archie Manning, Peyton Manning, Troy Vincent, and Ken Houston. Prior to his ascension to the Supreme Court, White had been All-Pro three times (1938, 1940, 1941) and the NFL rushing champion twice (1938 and 1940).

The 2001 recipient, Michael McCrary, was the child in the Supreme Court case Runyon v. McCrary (1976) in which Justice White had participated nearly a quarter of a century before McCrary's award. White had dissented from the position taken by the lawyers for McCrary.

Greenway (surname)

Greenway is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Barney Greenway (born 1969), British death metal vocalist

Brian Greenway (born 1951), Canadian guitarist and vocalist

Chad Greenway (born 1983), American football player

Diana Greenway (born 1937), British historian and academic

Francis Greenway (1777–1837), Australian architect

G. Lauder Greenway (1904 - 1981), Chairman, Metropolitan Opera Association

Harry Greenway (born 1934), British politician

Isabella Greenway (1886–1953), U.S. Congresswoman

James Greenway (1903–1989), American ornithologist and Curator, Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard

John Greenway (folklorist) (1919-1991)

John Greenway (MP) (born 1946), British Conservative politician

John Campbell Greenway (1872–1926), General, U.S. Army and Mining Magnate

Thomas Greenway (1838–1908), Premier of Manitoba, Canada

Thomas John Greenway, mining metallurgist in Australia

Tom Greenway (1909–1985), American actor

Iowa Hawkeyes football statistical leaders

The Iowa Hawkeyes football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Iowa Hawkeyes football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Hawkeyes represent the University of Iowa Kate Osterheld

Although Iowa began competing in intercollegiate football in 1889, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1939. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1939, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Hawkeyes have played in 14 bowl games since then, allowing recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.Statistics are current through the end of the 2018 season. Players active during the 2018 season are shown in bold.

List of Iowa Hawkeyes football honorees

The Iowa Hawkeyes football team was founded in 1889 to represent the University of Iowa in intercollegiate competition, and it has participated in the sport every season since. Over the course of the team's history, individual Hawkeye players of exceptional ability have received many accolades.

Iowa has had several players inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, College Football Hall of Fame, Canadian Football Hall of Fame, and Iowa Sports Hall of Fame. Individual Hawkeyes have won many prestigious national awards, including the Outland Trophy, the Davey O'Brien Award, the Doak Walker Award, the Jim Thorpe Award, and the Heisman Trophy. 92 Hawkeyes have been named a first-team or second-team All-American, and 27 have been named consensus first-team All-Americans.

The Iowa Hawkeyes have had ten players win the Big Ten Most Valuable Player Award, and 219 Hawks have earned All-Big Ten recognition. Iowa has had 244 NFL draft picks, and several former Hawkeye players have gone on to become NFL head coaches or Division I college head coaches.

NFL Top 100 Players of 2013

The NFL Top 100 Players of 2013 was the third season of the series. It ended with reigning NFL MVP Adrian Peterson being ranked #1, while Super Bowl MVP Joe Flacco was ranked #19.

Riley Reiff

Riley Reiff (born December 1, 1988) is an American football offensive tackle for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League. He played college football at Iowa and was drafted by the Detroit Lions in the first round, 23rd overall of the 2012 NFL Draft. After spending five seasons with the Lions, Reiff became a free agent and signed with the Vikings.

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