Central European Summer Time

Central European Summer Time (CEST), sometime referred also as Central European Daylight Time (CEDT), is the standard clock time observed during the period of summer daylight-saving in those European countries which observe Central European Time (UTC+01:00) during the other part of the year. It corresponds to UTC+02:00, which makes it the same as Central Africa Time, South African Standard Time and Kaliningrad Time in Russia.[1]

Time zones of Europe
Time in Europe:
light blue Western European Time / Greenwich Mean Time (UTC)
blue Western European Time / Greenwich Mean Time (UTC)
Western European Summer Time / British Summer Time / Irish Standard Time (UTC+1)
red Central European Time (UTC+1)
Central European Summer Time (UTC+2)
yellow Eastern European Time / Kaliningrad Time (UTC+2)
golden Eastern European Time (UTC+2)
Eastern European Summer Time (UTC+3)
light green Further-eastern European Time / Moscow Time / Turkey Time (UTC+3)
Light colours indicate where standard time is observed all year; dark colours indicate where a summer time is observed.

Names

Other names which have been applied to Central European Summer Time are Middle European Summer Time (MEST),[2] Central European Daylight Saving Time (CEDT),[3] and Bravo Time (after the second letter of the NATO phonetic alphabet).[4] It is also in practice called CET, for example in invitations to events during the summer.

Period of observation

Since 1996, European Summer Time has been observed between 01:00 UTC (02:00 CET and 03:00 CEST) on the last Sunday of March, and 01:00 UTC on the last Sunday of October; previously the rules were not uniform across the European Union.[5]

There are short term plans to abandon summer time in Europe.

Usage

The following countries and territories regularly use Central European Summer Time:[6]

The following countries have also used Central European Summer Time in the past:

See also

References

  1. ^ "CEST time now". 24timezones.com. Retrieved 2018-07-20.
  2. ^ "Time zone names- Middle European Daylight, Middle European Summer, Mitteieuropaische Sommerzeit (german)". www.worldtimezone.com. Retrieved 2018-07-20.
  3. ^ "CEDT - Central European Daylight Time: Current local time". Time Difference. Retrieved 2018-07-20.
  4. ^ "B – Bravo Time Zone (Time Zone Abbreviation)". www.timeanddate.com. Retrieved 2018-07-20.
  5. ^ Joseph Myers (2009-07-17). "History of legal time in Britain". Retrieved 2009-10-11.
  6. ^ "CEST – Central European Summer Time (Time Zone Abbreviation)". www.timeanddate.com. Retrieved 2018-07-20.
2001–02 UEFA Champions League knockout stage

The knockout stage of the 2001–02 UEFA Champions League began on 2 April 2002 and ended on 15 May 2002 with the final at Hampden Park in Glasgow, Scotland.

All times Central European Summer Time (UTC+2)

2017 FIVB Volleyball World League

The 2017 FIVB Volleyball World League was the 28th edition of the annual men's international volleyball tournament played by 36 teams between 2 June and 8 July. The Group 1 Final Round was held in Curitiba, Brazil.In front of a crowd of 23,149 fans, France lifted the FIVB Volleyball World League trophy for the second time of their history, prevailing on an epic battle over hosts Brazil 3–2. This marked the fifth time in the last seven editions with Brazil reaching the final without successfully winning the gold medal. Canada wrapped up their best ever World League campaign by seizing the bronze medal (their first medal at an international FIVB event) after coming from behind for a 3–1 win over United States. Earvin N'Gapeth was elected the Most Valuable Player for the second time, after also being the MVP in 2015.Slovenia defeated Japan in the Group 2 finals in Gold Coast, Australia to achieve their second straight group title since their debut last year (the team had previously won the Group 3 in 2016).Moreover, Estonia finished atop of Group 3 at their first ever World League participation after a convincing 3–0 win over Spain in the final match in León, Mexico.On 11 June 2017, the new one-set-score world record for national teams was established in the Group 3 intercontinental round match between Qatar and Venezuela. They spent 49 minutes in a 45–43 third set that was won by Qatar. The previous highest set score was 44–42, which had happened twice (in the 1999 FIVB Volleyball World League match between Canada and Brazil, and in the 2016 World Olympic Qualifying Tournament match between France and Australia).

2018 Supercopa de España de Baloncesto

The 2018 Supercopa de España de Baloncesto was the 15th edition of the tournament since it is organized by the ACB and the 19th overall. It was also called Supercopa Endesa for sponsorship reasons. It was played in the Multiusos Fontes do Sar in Santiago de Compostela in September 2018. Valencia Basket was the defending champion, but did not qualify for the competition.

All times were in Central European Summer Time (UTC+02:00).

CEST

CEST or cest may refer to:

Central European Summer Time (UTC+2), daylight saving time observed in the central European time zone

Cognitive-Experiential Self-Theory

Cest, a female girdle

Cest or Cesti, informal or plural for Cestus, an ancient battle glove

-cest, a portmanteau or libfix appended to sexual concepts

Central European Time

Central European Time (CET), used in most parts of Europe and a few North African countries, is a standard time which is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The time offset from UTC can be written as UTC+01:00. The same standard time, UTC+01:00, is also known as Middle European Time (MET, German: MEZ) and under other names like Berlin Time, Warsaw Time and Romance Standard Time (RST), Paris Time or Rome Time.The 15th meridian east is the central axis for UTC+01:00 in the world system of time zones.

As of 2011, all member states of the European Union observe summer time; those that during the winter use CET use Central European Summer Time (CEST) (or: UTC+02:00, daylight saving time) in summer (from last Sunday of March to last Sunday of October).A number of African countries use UTC+01:00 all year long, where it is called West Africa Time (WAT), although Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia also use the term Central European Time.

Eastern European Summer Time

Eastern European Summer Time (EEST) is one of the names of UTC+03:00 time zone, 3 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. It is used as a summer daylight saving time in some European and Middle Eastern countries, which makes it the same as Arabia Standard Time, East Africa Time and Moscow Time. During the winter periods, Eastern European Time (UTC+02:00) is used.

Since 1996 European Summer Time has been observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October; previously the rules were not uniform across the European Union.

Time in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bosnia and Herzegovina uses a single time zone, denoted as Central European Time (CET: UTC+01:00). It also observes summer time, shifting to Central European Summer Time (CEST: UTC+02:00).

The shift to Daylight Saving Time (DST) occurs on the date as specified for the European Summer Time since 1983, when the system was introduced in the former SFR Yugoslavia.

Time in France

Metropolitan France uses Central European Time (heure d'Europe centrale, HEC: UTC+01:00) and Central European Summer Time (heure d'été d'Europe centrale: UTC+02:00). Daylight saving time is observed in Metropolitan France from the last Sunday in March (02:00 CET) to the last Sunday in October (03:00 CEST). With its overseas territories, France uses 12 different time zones, more than any other country in the world.

Time in Germany

The time zone in Germany is Central European Time (Mitteleuropäische Zeit, MEZ; UTC+01:00) and Central European Summer Time (Mitteleuropäische Sommerzeit, MESZ; UTC+02:00). Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March (02:00 CET) to the last Sunday in October (03:00 CEST). The doubled hour during the switch back to standard time is named 2A (02:00 to 03:00 CEST) and 2B (02:00 to 03:00 CET).

Time in Gibraltar

Gibraltar uses Standard Time or Central European Time (UTC+01:00) and daylight saving time or Central European Summer Time (UTC+02:00).

Time in Italy

Italy alternates between Central European Time (Italian: Tempo dell'Europa Centrale, UTC+01:00) and Central European Summer Time (Italian: Orario Estivo dell'Europa Centrale, UTC+02:00), because it follows the European Summer Time annual Daylight saving time procedure. As such Italy begins observing Central European Summer Time at 02:00 CET on the last Sunday in March and switches back to Central European Time on the last Sunday of October since 1996.

Time in Spain

Spain has two time zones and observes daylight saving time. Spain mainly uses Central European Time (GMT+01:00) and Central European Summer Time (GMT+02:00) in Peninsular Spain, the Balearic Islands, Ceuta, Melilla and plazas de soberanía. In the Canary Islands, the time zone is Western European Time (GMT±00:00) and Western European Summer Time (GMT+01:00). Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March (01:00 GMT) to the last Sunday in October (01:00 GMT) throughout Spain.

Spain used Greenwich Mean Time (UTC±00:00) before the Second World War (except for the Canary Islands which used GMT−01:00 before this date). However, the time zone was changed to Central European Time in 1940 and has remained so since then, meaning that Spain does not use its "natural" time zone under the coordinated time zone system. Some observers believe that this time zone shift plays a role in the country's relatively unusual daily schedule (late meals and sleep times).

Time in Switzerland

Switzerland uses a single time zone, denoted as Central European Time (CET: UTC+01:00). Switzerland also observes summer time, shifting to Central European Summer Time (CEST: UTC+02:00).

Time in the Czech Republic

Time in the Czech Republic is Central European Time (Středoevropský čas, SEČ: UTC+01:00) and Central European Summer Time (Středoevropský letní čas, SELČ: UTC+02:00). Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March (2:00 CET) to the last Sunday in October (3:00 CEST). The Czech Republic has observed Central European Time since 1979. Until 1993 when Czechoslovakia was separated into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, they also had Central European Time and Central European Summer Time. After the summer months, time in the Czech Republic is shifted back by one hour to Central European Time. Like most states in Europe, Summer time (daylight saving time) is observed in the Czech Republic, when time is shifted forward by one hour, two hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time.

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