Central European International Cup

The Central European International Cup was an international football competition held by certain national teams from Central Europe between 1927 and 1960.[1] There were competitions for professional and amateur teams. Participating nations were Austria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Romania, Switzerland and (in the final competition) Yugoslavia. Poland and Romania only competed in the amateur competition.

Played as a league on a home and away basis, it was contested six times and each single tournament usually took more than two years to complete. The last two tournaments lasted five years. It was discontinued in 1960, when the European Football Championship started. Winners of the competition included the Austrian Wunderteam of the early 1930s, the Italy team that also won two World Cups in the 1930s, the Golden Team of Hungary and the Czechoslovakia team that later finished as World Cup runners up in 1962.

Central European International Cup
Founded1927
Abolished1960
RegionCentral Europe

Trophy

The trophy of the early competitions was named Švehla Cup after Antonín Švehla, the prime minister of Czechoslovakia, who donated it. After the Second World War the new trophy was known as the Dr. Gerö Cup in honour of Josef Gerö, a director of the Austrian Football Association and former match referee.

History

The competition was conceived by the Austrian football pioneer Hugo Meisl, regarded by some as one of the fathers of European football. Meisl was also behind the launch of the Mitropa Cup, a knockout competition for club teams from the same countries which also began in 1927. He also managed Austria during the Wunderteam era of the 1930s and led them to victory in the 1931-32 competition.

The first tournament played between 1927 and 1930 had been won by an Italy team inspired by Giuseppe Meazza. Meazza and Italy also won the 1933-35 competition. This time the team was coached by Vittorio Pozzo and either side of winning this competition they also won two World Cups in 1934 and 1938. The fourth tournament which began in 1936 was eventually abandoned due to the Anschluss Crisis and because of the Second World War, while a fifth tournament was not held until 1948. This tournament marked the advent of the Golden Team of Hungary, coached by Gusztáv Sebes and featuring Ferenc Puskás, Zoltán Czibor, Sándor Kocsis, Nándor Hidegkuti, József Bozsik and Gyula Grosics. They claimed the trophy after a 3-0 win over Italy in Rome in 1953.

Winners

Final placings

Years Classification
Winner Points Runner-up Points Third place Points
1927–1930  Italy 11  Czechoslovakia 10  Austria 10
1931–1932  Austria 11  Italy 9  Hungary 8
1933–1935  Italy 11  Austria 9  Hungary 9
1936–1938 Tournament was interrupted due to Anschluss 12 March 1938.
1948–1953  Hungary 11  Czechoslovakia 9  Austria 9
1955–1960  Czechoslovakia 16  Hungary 15  Austria 11
Years Classification (Amateur Competition)
Winner Points Runner-up Points Third place Points
1929–1930  Poland 7  Hungary (A) 6  Austria (A) 6
1933–1934  Romania 9  Hungary (A) 6  Czechoslovakia (A) 5

Topscorers

Years Top Scorers
Goals Striker National team
1927–1930 6 goals Julio Libonatti
Gino Rossetti
Italy
Italy
1931–1932 8 goals István Avar Hungary
1933–1935 7 goals Leopold Kielholz
György Sárosi
Switzerland
Hungary
1936–1938 10 goals György Sárosi Hungary
1948–1953 10 goals Ferenc Puskás Hungary
1955–1960 7 goals Lajos Tichy Hungary

See also

References

  1. ^ Leo Schidrowitz "Internationaler Cup", Vienna 1954

External links

1927–30 Central European International Cup

The 1927–30 Central European International Cup was the first edition of the Central European International Cup and was held between September 18, 1927 and May 11, 1930. The tournament's structure included a round-robin competition for the five teams involved. As the winner was to receive a Bohemian crystal cup offered by Prime Minister of Czechoslovakia Antonín Švehla, the tournament became known as the Antonín Švehla Cup.

1931–32 Central European International Cup

The 1931–32 Central European International Cup was the second edition of the Central European International Cup played between 1931 and 1932. It was played in a round robin tournament between five teams involved in the tournament.

1933–35 Central European International Cup

The 1933–35 Central European International Cup was the third edition of the Central European International Cup played between 1933 and 1935. It was played in a round robin tournament between five teams involved in the tournament.

1936–38 Central European International Cup

The 1936–38 Central European International Cup was the fourth edition of the Central European International Cup played between 1936 and 1938. It was played in a round robin tournament between five teams involved in the tournament. This edition of the tournament was interrupted due to the annexation of Austria to Nazi Germany on 12 March 1938.

1948–53 Central European International Cup

The 1948–53 Central European International Cup was the fifth edition of the Central European International Cup played between 1948 and 1953. It was played in a round robin tournament between five teams involved in the tournament.

1955–60 Central European International Cup

The 1955–60 Central European International Cup was the final edition of the Central European International Cup. It was replaced by the European Nations Championship. Yugoslavia took part for the first time.

Adolfo Baloncieri

Adolfo Baloncieri (Italian pronunciation: [aˈdɔlfo balonˈtʃɛːri]; 27 July 1897 – 23 July 1986) was an Italian football manager and former player who played as a midfielder.

Critically regarded as one of the greatest footballers of all time, Gianni Brera considered him one of the greatest Italian playmakers ever, alongside the likes of Giuseppe Meazza and Valentino Mazzola. In 2010, Carlo Felice Chiesa wrote: "If it were possible to rank all-time great "registas" of world football, Adolfo Baloncieri, an athlete from a period so remote from our own, would end up among the first, if not first." Baloncieri began his club career with Alessandria, but most notably played for Torino, where he won league titles in 1927 and 1928 (the 1927 title was later revoked). Following his retirement, he also coached several clubs in Italy.

At international level, he took part at three editions of the Summer Olympic games with Italy, captaining the Italy national football team to a bronze medal at the 1928 Summer Olympics, and also won the Central European International Cup with Italy. With 25 goals, he is the sixth highest all-time scorer of the Italian national team, alongside Filippo Inzaghi and Alessandro Altobelli, and he is also the highest scoring midfielder in the history of the Italian national side.

Austria–Hungary football rivalry

The Austria–Hungary rivalry is a highly competitive sports rivalry that exists between the national football teams of the two countries, as well as their respective sets of fans. The match-up between Austria and Hungary is the second most-played international in football (only Argentina and Uruguay have met each other in more matches).

Eraldo Monzeglio

Eraldo Monzeglio (Italian pronunciation: [eˈraldo monˈdzeʎʎo]; 5 June 1906 – 3 November 1981) was an Italian association football coach and player, who played as a defender, in the position of full-back. Monzeglio had a highly successful career as a footballer, although he also later attracted controversy due to his close relationship with the Italian fascist dictator Benito Mussolini. At club level, he played for Casale, Bologna, and Roma, winning the Serie A title and two editions of the Mitropa Cup with Bologna. At international level, he also had success representing the Italy national football team, and was a member of the Italian teams that won consecutive FIFA World Cup titles in 1934 and 1938, being named to the tournament's All-star Team in 1934; he also won two editions of the Central European International Cup with Italy. Along with Giuseppe Meazza and Giovanni Ferrari, he is one of only three Italian players to have won two World Cups. Following his retirement as a player, he worked as a coach for Italian clubs Como, Pro Sesto, Napoli, Sampdoria, and Juventus, as well as Swiss club Chiasso. He was posthumously inducted into the Italian Football Hall of Fame in 2013.

Ernst Melchior

Ernst Melchior (26 June 1920 in Villach – 5 August 1978 in Rouen, France) was an Austrian football player.

Giuseppe Meazza

Giuseppe "Peppino" Meazza (Italian pronunciation: [dʒuˈzɛppe meˈattsa]; 23 August 1910 – 21 August 1979), also known as il Balilla, was an Italian football manager and player. Throughout his career, he played mainly for Internazionale in the 1930s, scoring 242 goals in 365 games for the club, and winning three Serie A titles, as well as the Coppa Italia; he later also played for local rivals Milan, as well as Turin rivals Juventus, in addition to his spells with Varese and Atalanta. At international level, he led Italy to win two consecutive World Cups: in 1934 on home soil, and in 1938 as captain; he was named to the All-star Team and won the Golden Ball Award at the 1934 World Cup, as the tournament's best player. Along with Giovanni Ferrari and Eraldo Monzeglio, he is one of only three Italian players to have won two World Cups. Following his retirement, he served as a coach for the Italy national team, and with several Italian clubs, including his former club sides Inter and Atalanta, as well as Pro Patria, and Turkish club Beşiktaş; he was Italy's head coach at the 1952 Summer Olympics.

Meazza is widely considered one of the best players of his generation, and among the greatest of all time, as well as being regarded by many in the sport as Italy's greatest ever player. Giuseppe Prisco and Gianni Brera considered him to be the greatest footballer of all time. Due to his technical skill, prolific goalscoring, and creative ability, he was often given the nickname "il genio" (the genius) by the Italian press during his career. He has been ranked fourth-best player in the history of the World Cup. A prolific forward, Meazza won the Serie A top-scorer award on three occasions in his career; with 216 goals in Serie A, he is the fourth all-time highest goal scorer in Serie A, alongside José Altafini, and with 33 goals, he is also the second highest goalscorer for the Italian national team. With 338 goals, he is the third-highest Italian goalscorer in all competitions. He is also the youngest player ever to score 100 goals in Serie A, a feat which he achieved at the age of 23 years and 32 days. San Siro, the principal stadium in his native city of Milan, which is today shared by two of his former clubs, Internazionale and crosstown rivals A.C. Milan, is now officially called Stadio Giuseppe Meazza in the player's honour. In 2011, he was posthumously inducted into the Italian Football Hall of Fame.

Italy national football team results (1930–49)

This is a list of the Italy national football team results from 1930 to 1949. During this period, Italy achieved first place at the 1934 and 1938 FIFA World Cup, the gold medal at the 1936 Olympic football tournament, and first place at the 1927–30 and the 1933–35 Central European International Cup as well as coming in second place at the 1931–32 and the 1936–38 editions of the latter tournament.

Italy national football team results (1950–69)

This is a list of the Italy national football team results from 1950 to 1969. During this period, Italy achieved first place at UEFA Euro 1968.

Julio Libonatti

Julio Libonatti (5 July 1901 – 9 October 1981) was a football manager and former footballer who played as a forward for the Argentina national team and Italy national team.

Born in Rosario, Argentina, he started his career with Newell's Old Boys in 1917. In 1925 he became the first recorded trans-Atlantic transfer, when he moved to Italian club Torino. With 150 total goals with Torino, he is the second most prolific scorer in the history of the Torinese club after Paolo Pulici (172). He won the Scudetto with Torino in 1926–27 and 1927–28, although the first title was later revoked. Later in his career he also represented Genoa and Libertas Rimini.

Internationally, Libonatti won the 1921 South American Championship with Argentina. He later represented Italy and won the 1927–30 Central European International Cup.

Lajos Tichy

Lajos Tichy (21 March 1935 – 6 January 1999) was a Hungarian footballer. He played for the club Budapest Honvéd FC, scoring 247 goals in 320 league games. He also scored 51 goals in 72 internationals for the Hungary national football team, including four in the 1958 FIFA World Cup and three in the 1962 FIFA World Cup. He later became coach of the Honved youth team and from 1976 to 1982 he coached the first team, helping them win their first Hungarian championship in 25 years in 1980. The "Nation's Bomber" died in 1999 aged 63.

Mario Magnozzi

Mario Magnozzi (Italian pronunciation: [ˈmaːrjo maɲˈɲɔttsi]; 20 March 1902 – 25 June 1971) was an Italian footballer who played as a forward. He competed in the 1928 Summer Olympics with the Italy national football team.

Nazio-Juve

Nazio-Juve was the nickname of the group of Juventus F.C. players called up to have been the backbone to the Italy national football team managed by Vittorio Pozzo to have won the 1934 FIFA World Cup and two editions of the Central European International Cup (1927–30 and 1933–35).

With this group the side managed by Carlo Carcano have dominated the Italian football and had one of the best teams in Europe during the first half of the 1930s, winning amongst others a record of five national championships in a row and reached the Central European Club Cup's semifinals since 1932 to 1935, and included the formidable defensive trio Combi-Rosetta-Caligaris, Giovanni Ferrari, Felice Borel II and the oriundi Luis Monti, Raimundo Orsi and Renato Cesarini.

Raimundo Orsi

Raimundo Bibiani "Mumo" Orsi (2 December 1901 – 6 April 1986) was an Italian Argentine footballer who played as a winger or as a forward. At international level, he represented both countries, winning the 1927 Copa América and the silver medal at the 1928 Summer Olympics in Amsterdam, Netherlands, with Argentina, as well as two editions of the Central European International Cup and the 1934 FIFA World Cup, with Italy.

Vittorio Pozzo

Vittorio Pozzo (Italian pronunciation: [vitˈtɔːrjo ˈpottso]; 2 March 1886 – 21 December 1968) was an Italian football manager, player and journalist.

The creator of the Metodo tactical formation, Pozzo is regarded as one of the greatest managers of all time, and is the only person to guide his national team to two FIFA World Cup champions as coach, leading the Italian national team to victory in the 1934 and 1938 FIFA World Cups.He also led Italy to a gold medal at the 1936 Olympic football tournament, and managed the champions of the 1930 and 1935 Central European International Cup.

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