Central China

Central China (simplified Chinese: 华中; traditional Chinese: 華中; pinyin: Huázhōng) is a geographical and a loosely defined cultural region that covers the central area of China. This region includes the provinces of Henan, Hubei and Hunan, as Jiangxi is sometimes also regarded to be part of this region. Central China is now officially part of South Central China governed by the People's Republic of China. In the context of the Rise of Central China Plan by the State Council of the People's Republic of China in 2004, surrounding provinces including Shanxi, Anhui, are also defined as regions of Central China development zones.

Huazhong China
Central China region.
Zhongguo jingji bankuai
Green = Rise of Central China Plan

Administrative divisions

GB[1] ISO №[2] Province Chinese Name Capital Population Density Area Abbreviation/Symbol
HA 41 Henan Province 河南省
Hénán Shěng
Zhengzhou 94,023,567 563.01 167,000
HB 42 Hubei Province 湖北省
Húběi Shěng
Wuhan 57,237,740 307.89 185,900
È
HN 43 Hunan Province 湖南省
Húnán Shěng
Changsha 65,683,722 312.77 210,000
Xiāng

Cities with urban area over one million in population

Provincial capitals in bold.

# City Urban area[3] District area[3] City proper[3] Prov. Census date
1 Wuhan 7,541,527 9,785,388 9,785,388 HB 2010-11-01
2 Zhengzhou 3,677,032 4,253,913 8,627,089 HA 2010-11-01
3 Changsha 2,963,218 3,092,213 7,040,952 HN 2010-11-01
4 Luoyang 1,584,463 1,926,079 6,549,941 HA 2010-11-01
5 Xiangfan[a] 1,433,057 2,199,690 5,500,307 HB 2010-11-01
6 Hengyang 1,115,645 1,133,967 7,148,344 HN 2010-11-01
7 Yichang 1,049,363 1,411,380 4,059,686 HB 2010-11-01
  1. ^ Xiangfan was renamed as Xiangyang on 2 December 2010.

See also

References

  1. ^ GB/T 2260 codes for the provinces of China
  2. ^ ISO 3166-2:CN (ISO 3166-2 codes for the provinces of China)
  3. ^ a b c 国务院人口普查办公室、国家统计局人口和社会科技统计司编 (2012). 中国2010年人口普查分县资料. Beijing: 中国统计出版社 [China Statistics Press]. ISBN 978-7-5037-6659-6.
1931 China floods

The 1931 China floods or the 1931 Yangtze-Huai River floods were a series of devastating floods that occurred in the Republic of China. They were some of the deadliest floods in history, and together formed one of the most lethal natural disasters of the 20th century, excluding pandemics and famines. Estimates of the total death toll range from 422,499 to between 3.7 million and 4 million.

Central China Normal University

Central China Normal University (CCNU) or Huazhong Normal University (simplified Chinese: 华中师范大学; traditional Chinese: 華中師範大學; pinyin: Huázhōng Shīfàn Dàxué), located in Central China Normal University Community, Luonan Subdistrict, Hongshan District in Wuhan, the capital of Hubei Province, is a comprehensive university directly under the administration of the Chinese Ministry of Education. The campus of over 2,000 Mu (330 acres) is on Guizi Hill, bordering South Lake.

It is one of the schools included in the Project 211, and is also funded by the Project 985. It is a Chinese Ministry of Education Double First Class Discipline University, with Double First Class status in certain disciplines.

CCNU, along with East China Normal University and Beijing Normal University are the top three normal universities in mainland China. CCNU is ranked 3rd together with Fudan University and just after Peking University and Renmin University of China.

Chen Baihuai

Chen Baihuai (simplified Chinese: 陈柏槐; traditional Chinese: 陳柏槐; pinyin: Chén Baǐhuaí; born August 1950) is a former Chinese politician from Hubei province. At the height of his career he served as the deputy chairman of the province's political advisory body. He was detained and underwent trial for corruption charges in 2014.

China Central Television

China Central Television (CCTV, formerly Beijing Television), is the predominant state television broadcaster in the People's Republic of China. CCTV has a network of 50 channels broadcasting different programmes and is accessible to more than one billion viewers. As of present, there are 50 television channels, and the broadcaster provides programming in six different languages. Most of its programmes are a mixture of news, documentary, social education, comedy, entertainment, and drama, the majority of which consists of Chinese soap operas and entertainment.

Dabie Mountains

The Dabie Mountains (Chinese: 大别山; pinyin: Dàbié Shān) are a major mountain range located in central China. Running northwest-to-southeast, they form the main watershed between the Huai and Yangtze rivers. The range also marks the boundary between Hubei Province and its neighbors of Henan (to the north) and Anhui (to the east).

The western part of Dabie Mountains has a low elevation of only 1,000–1,300 feet (300–400 meters), though there are a few peaks rising to 3,000 feet (900 meters). The eastern part is higher, averaging more than 3,300 feet (1,000 meters). The highest peak is Mount Tianzhu at 5,820 feet (1,774 meters), with several others topping 5,000 feet (1,500 meters) including the 1,729.13 metres (5,673.0 ft) high Tiantangzhai.

Golden pheasant

The golden pheasant or Chinese pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) is a gamebird of the order Galliformes (gallinaceous birds) and the family Phasianidae (pheasants). The genus name is from Ancient Greek khrusolophos, "with golden crest", and pictus is Latin for "painted" from pingere, "to paint".

Huang Zhong

Huang Zhong (pronunciation , pinyin: Huáng Zhōng) (died 220), courtesy name Hansheng, was a military general serving under the warlord Liu Bei during the late Eastern Han dynasty of China. He is best known for his victory at the Battle of Mount Dingjun in 219, in which his force routed that of an enemy general, Xiahou Yuan, who was killed in action during the raid.Huang Zhong is portrayed in the 14th-century historical novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms and popular culture as an elderly general with youthful vigour and constitution, and as one of the Five Tiger Generals under Liu Bei.

Hubei

Hubei (湖北; formerly romanised as Hupeh) is a province of the People's Republic of China, located in the Central China region. The name of the province means "north of the lake", referring to its position north of Dongting Lake. The provincial capital is Wuhan, a major transportation thoroughfare and the political, cultural, and economic hub of Central China.

Hubei is officially abbreviated to "鄂" (È), an ancient name associated with the eastern part of the province since the State of E of the Western Zhou dynasty, while a popular name for Hubei is "楚" (Chǔ), after the powerful State of Chu that existed in the area during the Eastern Zhou dynasty. It borders Henan to the north, Anhui to the east, Jiangxi to the southeast, Hunan to the south, Chongqing to the west, and Shaanxi to the northwest. The high-profile Three Gorges Dam is located at Yichang, in the west of the province.

Hunan

Hunan (湖南) is a province of the People's Republic of China, located in the middle reaches of the Yangtze watershed in South Central China; it borders the province-level divisions of Hubei to the north, Jiangxi to the east, Guangdong and Guangxi to the south, Guizhou to the west, and Chongqing to the northwest. With a population of just over 67 million as of 2014 residing in an area of approximately 210,000 km2 (81,000 sq mi), it is China's 7th most populous and the 10th most extensive province-level by area.

The name Hunan literally means "south of the lake"; Hu means "lake" while nan means "south.". The lake that is referred to is Dongting Lake, a lake in the northeast of the province; Vehicle license plates from Hunan are marked Xiāng (Chinese: 湘), after the Xiang River, which runs from south to north through Hunan and forms part of the largest drainage system for the province. Its capital and largest city is Changsha, which also abuts the Xiang River.

Indian giant flying squirrel

The Indian giant flying squirrel (Petaurista philippensis), also called the large brown flying squirrel or the common giant flying squirrel, is a species of rodent in the Sciuridae family. It is capable of gliding flight using a skin membrane stretched between front and hind legs. It is found in mainland Southeast and South Asia, and southern and central China.

List of regions of China

This is a list of the 31 provincial-level divisions of China grouped by its former administrative areas from 1949 to 1952, which are now known as traditional regions.

Luoxiao Mountains

The Luoxiao Mountains (simplified Chinese: 罗霄山脉; traditional Chinese: 羅霄山脈; pinyin: Luóxiāo Shānmài) are a system of mountain ranges in the People's Republic of China that straddle Jiangxi, Hubei, and Hunan provinces.

Rise of Central China Plan

The Rise of Central China Plan (simplified Chinese: 中部崛起计划; traditional Chinese: 中部崛起計劃; pinyin: Zhōngbù Juéqǐ Jìhuà) is a policy adopted by the People's Republic of China to accelerate the development of its central regions. It was announced by Premier Wen Jiabao on 5 March 2004. It covers six provinces: Shanxi, Henan, Anhui, Hubei, Hunan, and Jiangxi.

South Central China

South Central China (Chinese: 中南; pinyin: Zhōngnán; literally: "South China") is a region of the People's Republic of China defined by governmental bureaus that includes the provinces of Guangdong, Hainan, Henan, Hubei, and Hunan, and the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, however the two provincial-level special administrative regions (SAR) are also often included under South Central China: Hong Kong and Macau. This part is often divided into South China (华南) and Central China (华中) regions due to difference between civilian customs.

South China

South China or Southern China (simplified Chinese: 华南; traditional Chinese: 華南; pinyin: huá nán) is a geographical and cultural region that covers the southernmost part of China. Its precise meaning varies with context.

In normal parlance and geography, it refers to the region south of the Qinling Huaihe Line.

Temperate broadleaf and mixed forest

Temperate broadleaf and mixed forest is a temperate climate terrestrial habitat type defined by the World Wide Fund for Nature, with broadleaf tree ecoregions, and with conifer and broadleaf tree mixed coniferous forest ecoregions.These forests are richest and most distinctive in central China and eastern North America, with some other globally distinctive ecoregions in the Caucasus, the Himalayas, southern Europe, and the Russian Far East.

Yunmenglong

Yunmenglong is an extinct genus of somphospondylan sauropod known from the late Early Cretaceous of Henan Province, central China. Its remains were discovered in the Haoling Formation of the Ruyang Basin. The type species is Yunmenglong ruyangensis, described in 2013 by Junchang Lü et al. on the basis of an incomplete postcranial skeleton. Yunmenglong shares some characters with Euhelopus, Qiaowanlong and Erketu, and a phylogenetic analysis places it as a sister taxon of Qiaowanlong, both grouped with Erketu in a position more derived than Euhelopus but basal to Titanosauria. Yunmenglong represents the first long-necked sauropod dinosaur recorded from central China to date.

Zhang Lebin

Zhang Lebin (born April 1958) is a former Chinese politician who spent most of his career in Communist Youth League of China Central Committee. He previously served as deputy director of the State Administration for Religious Affairs. As of September 2015 he was under investigation by the Communist Party's anti-corruption agency.

Zhongyuan

Zhongyuan (Chinese: 中原; pinyin: Zhōngyuán), Chungyuan, or the Central Plain, also known as Zhongtu (Chinese: 中土; pinyin: Zhōngtǔ), Chungtu or Zhongzhou (Chinese: 中州; pinyin: Zhōngzhōu), Chungchou, is the area on the lower reaches of the Yellow River which formed the cradle of Chinese civilization. It forms part of the North China Plain.

In its narrowest sense, the Central Plain covers modern-day Henan, the southern part of Hebei, the southern part of Shanxi, and the western part of Shandong province. A broader interpretation of the Central Plain's extent would add the Guanzhong plain of Shaanxi, the northwestern part of Jiangsu, and parts of Anhui and northern Hubei.

Since the beginning of recorded history, the Central Plain has been an important site for Chinese civilization.

In the pre-Qin era, present-day Luoyang and its nearby areas were considered the “Center of the World”, as the political seat of the Xia dynasty was located around Songshan and the Yi-Luo river basin.

Inscriptions on some bronze objects from this era contain references to the 'Central States' (Zhongguo), 'Eastern States', or 'Southern States'. This indicates that the Central Plain, which was referred to as the 'Central States' in these inscriptions, was considered to occupy the center of the world.

In a broader context, the term Zhongyuan refers to Chinese civilization and China proper, regions directly governed by centralized Chinese governments and dynasties. However, when used to describe the Chinese civilization, Zhongyuan often connotes Huaxia and Han Chinese cultural dominance.

The Dungans, a Chinese-affiliated ethnic group, are referred to using terms linked to Zhongyuan.

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