Central Bedfordshire

Central Bedfordshire is a unitary authority area in the ceremonial county of Bedfordshire, England. It was created from the merger of Mid Bedfordshire and South Bedfordshire District Councils on 1 April 2009.[1] With a budget of £500m the unitary council provides over a hundred services to a quarter of a million people, and is responsible for schools, social services, rubbish collection, roads, planning, leisure centres, libraries, care homes and more.[2][3]

Central Bedfordshire
Unitary Authority
Official logo of Central Bedfordshire

logo
Shown within Bedfordshire
Shown within Bedfordshire
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Constituent countryEngland
RegionEast of England
Ceremonial countyBedfordshire
Founded1 April 2009
Admin. HQChicksands
Government
 • Typeunitary authority
 • Leadership:Leader & Cabinet
 • Executive:Conservative
 • MPs:Alistair Burt (C)
Nadine Dorries (C)
Andrew Selous (C)
Area
 • Total276.3 sq mi (715.7 km2)
Area rank53rd
Population
 (mid-2018 est.)
 • Total283,606
 • RankRanked 47th
 • Density1,000/sq mi (400/km2)
Time zoneUTC+0 (Greenwich Mean Time)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+1 (British Summer Time)
ONS code00KC (ONS)
E06000056 (GSS)
Ethnicity97.3% White
Websitecentralbedfordshire.gov.uk

Council's Current Composition

UK Central Bedfordshire Council 2019
Party Councillors
Conservatives 41
Independents 13
Liberal Democrats 3
Labour 1
UK Independence Party 1
Total: 59
Source: Political Control

Administrative history

The county council of Bedfordshire was abolished on 1 April 2009. The term of office of councillors of Bedfordshire County Council and of Mid and South Bedfordshire District Councils ended on 1 April 2009. A new county and a new district, both from that date to be known as Central Bedfordshire, were created for the same area as the existing districts of Mid and South Bedfordshire. A new district council, the Central Bedfordshire Council, was created for the new district and became the sole principal authority for the district. There was to be no county council for the new county.[4]

In 2006 the Department for Communities and Local Government considered reorganising Bedfordshire's administrative structure as part of the 2009 structural changes to local government in England. The four proposals considered were:

  • Proposal 1, Abolish the three districts within the county and create a Bedfordshire County unitary authority. (Luton would remain a separate unitary authority.)
  • Proposal 2, Create two unitary authorities: one based on Bedford Borough and one as Central Bedfordshire, combining Mid and South Bedfordshire Districts.
  • Proposal 3, Create two unitary authorities: one a combination of Bedford Borough and Mid Beds District and the other of Luton Borough and South Beds District.
  • Proposal 4, Form an "enhanced two-tier" authority, with the four local councils under the control of the county council, but with different responsibilities.[5][6]

On 6 March 2008 the DCLG, under Labour Party Secretary of State, Hazel Blears, decided to implement Proposal 2. This meant that from 1 April 2009 there would be three unitary authorities in Bedfordshire: Bedford, Luton and Central Bedfordshire. Bedfordshire County Council challenged this decision in the High Court but on 4 April 2008 it was announced the Judicial Review had failed and the County Council would not appeal.[7][8][9][10] Subsequently, a shadow council for Central Bedfordshire was formed from all the members of Mid and South Bedfordshire councils, as well as all Bedfordshire County Council members from the Central Bedfordshire area. The inaugural meeting of the shadow council was held on 10 April 2008. A shadow Executive for the council was formed consisting of four members of each council, led by the former leader of Mid Bedfordshire District Council.[11]

Elections

Central Bedfordshire Council is made up of 59 Councillors.

Year Conservative Labour Liberal Democrat Independent Control
2009[12][13] 54 0 11 1 Conservative
2011[14]

[15]

49 1 5 4 Conservative
2015[16] 53 2 1 3 Conservative

Since 2011 the Council has been led by James Jamieson with a Cabinet of seven portfolio holders:

  • Corporate Services (finance)
  • Children's Services
  • Social Care, Health and Housing
  • Regeneration
  • Community Services
  • Partnerships
  • External affairs

Towns and villages

2009 Bedfordshire Ceremonial Numbered
Unitary authorities in Bedfordshire. Central Bedfordshire is number 2

The Central Bedfordshire area is a mix of rural and small market towns and villages. It includes the following towns and villages.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 30 October 2015.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 19 February 2014. Retrieved 11 February 2014.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "Welcome to Central Bedfordshire Council". Centralbedfordshire.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 16 February 2009. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  4. ^ http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2008/907/note/made Archived 5 January 2015 at the Wayback Machine - The Bedfordshire (Structural Changes) Order 2008
  5. ^ Bedfordshire County Council Archived 7 April 2008 at the Wayback Machine – The proposal
  6. ^ Communities and Local Government Archived 19 September 2012 at the UK Government Web Archive – Proposals for future unitary structures: Stakeholder consultation
  7. ^ Bedfordshire County Council: High Court backs two unitary authorities for Bedfordshire Archived 16 November 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ "County Council Fails in Legal Challenge To Unitary Status". Bedford.gov.uk. 1 April 2009. Archived from the original on 13 February 2012. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  9. ^ Unitary solution confirmed for Bedfordshire – New flagship unitary councils approved for Cheshire – Corporate – Communities and Local Government Archived 22 November 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ "County council to be abolished in shake-up". Bedford Today. 6 March 2008. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  11. ^ http://www.bedfordtoday.co.uk/bed-news/First-steps-towards-creating-Central.3968817.jp First steps towards creating Central Beds Council – Bedford Today (10/04/08)
  12. ^ "Central Bedfordshire Council: Election results by party, 4 June 2009". Centralbedfordshire.gov.uk. 4 June 2009. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  13. ^ "Election 2009 | Central Bedfordshire council". BBC News. 5 June 2009. Archived from the original on 8 June 2009. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  14. ^ "Central Bedfordshire Council: Election results". Centralbedfordshire.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 28 September 2014. Retrieved 2 January 2015.
  15. ^ "BBC News - Election 2011 - England council elections - Central Bedfordshire". BBC News. 10 May 2011. Archived from the original on 23 January 2016. Retrieved 2 January 2015.
  16. ^ "Central Bedfordshire Council: Election results". Centralbedfordshire.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 28 September 2014. Retrieved 3 June 2015.

External links

2011 Central Bedfordshire Council election

The 2011 Central Bedfordshire Council electionfor the Central Bedfordshire Council were held on 5 May 2011, along with other United Kingdom local elections. The whole council was up for election following boundary changes, with each successful candidate serving a four-year term of office, expiring in 2015.

All councillors defending their seats this year were first elected in 2009, when the council was formed.

The Conservative Party retained an overall control on the council, winning 49 of the 59 seats on the council. Of the remaining 10 seats, 4 were won by the Liberal Democrats, 4 were won by Independents and the Labour Party won its first seat on the council.

2015 Central Bedfordshire Council election

Elections to Central Bedfordshire Council were held on 7 May 2015, along with the 2015 United Kingdom general election and other local elections. The whole council was up for election, with each successful candidate serving a four-year term of office, expiring in 2019.

The Conservative Party retained overall control of the council, winning 53 of the 59 seats on the council. Of the remaining 6 seats, 3 were won by Independents, 2 were won by the Labour Party and 1 was won by the Liberal Democrats.

Beadlow

Beadlow is a hamlet in the Central Bedfordshire district of Bedfordshire, England. At the 2011 Census the population of the hamlet was included in the civil parish of Campton and Chicksands.

It is located around a mile and a half east of Clophill, of whose civil parish it forms a part, and around two and a half miles west of Shefford, in whose post town it lies. The River Flit flows through the hamlet.

Bedfordshire

Bedfordshire (; abbreviated Beds) is a county in the East of England. It is a ceremonial county and a historic county, covered by three unitary authorities: Bedford, Central Bedfordshire, and Luton.

Bedfordshire is bordered by Cambridgeshire to the east and northeast, Northamptonshire to the north, Buckinghamshire to the west and Hertfordshire to the southeast and south. It is the fourteenth most densely populated county of England, with over half the population of the county living in the two largest built-up areas: Luton (236,000) and the county town, Bedford (102,000). The highest elevation point is 243 metres (797 ft) on Dunstable Downs in the Chilterns.

Central Bedfordshire Council

Central Bedfordshire Council is the unitary authority for Central Bedfordshire in the ceremonial county of Bedfordshire, England.

It was created from the merger of Bedfordshire County Council and Mid Bedfordshire and South Bedfordshire District Councils on 1 April 2009.

With a budget of £500m the unitary council provides over a hundred services to a quarter of a million people, and is responsible for schools, social services, rubbish collection, roads, planning, leisure centres, libraries, care homes.

Since 2011 the Council has been led by Cllr James Jamieson with a Cabinet of seven portfolio holders:

• Corporate Services (finance)

• Children's Services

• Social Care, Health and Housing

• Regeneration

• Community Services

• Partnerships

• External affairs

The council has 59 Councillors; 52 Conservatives, 4 Independents, 2 Labour and 1 Liberal Democrat.

The last elections for Central Bedfordshire Council were in May 2015.

Central Bedfordshire Council elections

Central Bedfordshire is a unitary authority in Bedfordshire, England. It was created on 1 April 2009 replacing Mid Bedfordshire, South Bedfordshire and Bedfordshire County Council.

Civil parishes in Bedfordshire

A civil parish is a country subdivision, forming the lowest unit of local government in England. There are 125 civil parishes in the ceremonial county of Bedfordshire, most of the county being parished: Luton is completely unparished; Central Bedfordshire is entirely parished. At the 2001 census, there were 312,301 people living in the 125 parishes, which accounted for 55.2 per cent of the county's population.

Cranfield

Cranfield is a village and civil parish in north west Bedfordshire, England, between Bedford and Milton Keynes. It had a population of 4,909 in 2001, increasing to 5,369 at the 2011 Census. and is in Central Bedfordshire District.

The hamlet of Bourne End is located just north of Cranfield, and is part of the civil parish. Wharley End was a separate settlement, but now forms the northern part of Cranfield village, by the university.

Fancott

Fancott is a hamlet located in the Central Bedfordshire district of Bedfordshire, England.The settlement forms part of the Toddington civil parish, and is also close to Chalgrave and Chalton. "The Fancott" public house is situated in Fancott, and is the location of the Fancott Miniature Railway. At the 2011 Census the population of the hamlet was included in the civil parish of Chalgrave

Haynes Church End

Haynes Church End is located in the Central Bedfordshire district of Bedfordshire, England.

The settlement is close to the larger villages of Houghton Conquest and Haynes. Haynes Church End forms part of the Haynes civil parish and contains the Grade-II*-listed parish church of St Mary the Virgin.

Houghton Conquest

Houghton Conquest is a village and civil parish located in the Central Bedfordshire district of Bedfordshire, England. The parish also includes the hamlet of How End.

List of schools in Central Bedfordshire

This is a list of schools in Central Bedfordshire, a unitary authority in the English county of Bedfordshire.

Lower Sundon

Lower Sundon is a hamlet located in the Central Bedfordshire district of Bedfordshire, England.

The settlement was established before 1066, and St Mary the Virgin Church was first built in Lower Sundon in the 13th Century.Today, Lower Sundon lies in the wider Sundon civil parish, and is close to the large town of Luton.

Sandy, Bedfordshire

Sandy is a small market town and civil parish in Central Bedfordshire, England. It lies 8 miles (13 km) to the east of Bedford, 18 miles (29 km) to the south west of Cambridge and 43 miles (69 km) north of Central London. The town has a population of around 13,400 based on 2015 estimates.The A1 road bypasses the town to the west, with the East Coast Main Line running to the east. The area surrounding the town is dominated by a range of low hills known as the Sand Hills with the River Ivel running through the town.

The headquarters of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) is on the outskirts of the town, having moved to The Lodge in 1961. The Shuttleworth Collection is also nearby, around 2 miles (3 km) south west of Sandy.

Tebworth

Tebworth is a hamlet located in the Central Bedfordshire district of Bedfordshire, England.

The settlement is close to Wingfield and Hockliffe, with the nearest town being Houghton Regis. Amenities in Tebworth include "The Queens Head" pub.

Tebworth is part of the ward of 'Heath and Reach' which sends a Councillor to Central Bedfordshire Council. The ward includes the villages of Heath and Reach, Hockliffe, Eggington, Stanbridge, Tilsworth, Tebworth, and Wingrave. The ward was created in 2011 and has since been represented by Councillor Mark Versallion. At the 2011 Census the population of the hamlet was included in the civil parish of Chalgrave.

Thorn, Bedfordshire

Thorn is a hamlet located in the Central Bedfordshire district of Bedfordshire, England.

The settlement is located to the north of Bidwell and Houghton Regis, and to the south of Wingfield and Chalgrave.

Wingfield, Bedfordshire

Wingfield is a hamlet located in the Central Bedfordshire district of Bedfordshire, England.

The settlement is close to Tebworth and Chalgrave, with the nearest town being Houghton Regis.

Wingfield forms part of the Chalgrave civil parish, and is home to The Plough Inn public house.

The Icknield Way Path passes through the village on its 110-mile journey from Ivinghoe Beacon in Buckinghamshire to Knettishall Heath in Suffolk. The Icknield Way Trail, a multi-user route for walkers, horse riders and off-road cyclists also passes through the village.

Wingfield is part of the ward of 'Heath and Reach' which sends a Councillor to Central Bedfordshire Council. The ward includes the villages of Heath and Reach, Hockliffe, Eggington, Stanbridge, Tilsworth, Tebworth, and Wingrave. The ward was created in 2011 and has since been represented by Councillor Mark Versallion.

Woburn, Bedfordshire

Woburn () meaning twisted or crooked stream) is a village and civil parish in Bedfordshire, England. It is situated about 5 miles (8.0 km) southeast of the centre of Milton Keynes, and about 3 miles (4.8 km) south of junction 13 of the M1 motorway and is a tourist attraction. At the 2011 census, it had a population of 933.

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