Celtics–Knicks rivalry

The Celtics–Knicks rivalry is a National Basketball Association (NBA) rivalry between the Boston Celtics and the New York Knicks. The Celtics and Knicks are two of only three remaining charter franchises (the other being the Golden State Warriors) from the inaugural Basketball Association of America, which began operations in 1946.[1]

The rivalry mirrors the fierce competition between the Boston and New York City sports teams, as evidenced by the Red Sox–Yankees rivalry and the Jets–Patriots rivalry. Boston and New York City are only 190 miles apart, and both cities' professional sports teams are among the most historic in professional sports history.[1][2][3] The Celtics and Knicks were both established in 1946 as charter franchises of the Basketball Association of America, and are the two oldest teams still playing in their original city today.

CelticsWordmark
Boston Celtics
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New York Knicks
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History

1950s

The first playoff meeting was in the Division Semifinals of the 1950–51 season. This was the first round of the playoffs and a best-of-three series. The Knicks swept the Celtics and got to the NBA Finals, but lost to the Rochester Royals. The clubs squared off in the Division Semifinals once again in the following season. This time, the Celtics were able to win Game 1 at home, before the Knicks tied the series at home at 1. Game 3 was a tough, double overtime showdown in Boston, but the Knicks won 88–87. Once again, Knicks went to the finals and lost to the Lakers. In the 1952–53 season, the teams met in the Division Finals, a best-of-five series. The Knicks won Game 1, the Celtics won Game 2, each at home. The Knicks won Games 3 and 4 to win the series but lost to the Lakers in the Finals once again. Despite 3 Conference Championships from the help of future Hall of Famers Dick McGuire and Harry Gallatin, the Knicks never won an NBA title in the 1950s. For the 1953–54 season, the teams played in a round-robin format along with the Syracuse Nationals. This meant the 3 teams each played each other twice, and the one with the lowest winning % is eliminated. Syracuse went 4–0, Boston went 2–2, and New York went 0–4. Syracuse eliminated Boston in the following round. In the 1954–55 season, teams played each other in the Division Semifinals. The Celtics won Game 1 in Boston, the Knicks won Game 2 in New York, and the Celtics wrapped it up with a win in Game 3 but lost to the Nationals in the next round. It was the last playoff meeting until 1967. For the rest of the decade, the Knicks never advanced past the first round, while Boston won titles in the 1956–57, 1958–59, and 1959–60 seasons.

1960s

The Celtics major success continued into the 1960s as they were champions every season from 1959–66. They were led by Bob Cousy, Sam Jones, Frank Ramsey, Bill Russell, Satch Sanders, Tom Heinsohn, and K.C. Jones who all either had their number retired, or were inducted to the Hall of Fame. The Knicks' struggles continued by not qualifying for the playoffs from 1960–66. When the Knicks finally made it back to the playoffs in the 1966–67 season, they met the Celtics in the Division Semifinals. The Celtics won the first two, but the Knicks fought back to win Game 3. The Celtics ended the series with a win in New York, but did not win an NBA title that season as they were defeated by the Philadelphia 76ers in the next round. Boston won another title in 1968. In the 1968–69 season, the teams squared off in the Division Finals. Boston won the first two, but the Knicks won Game 3. Boston won Game 4 by one, then the Knicks won Game 5, but the Celtics won the series with another 1 point win en route to winning another NBA title.

1970s

In the 1971–72 season, the two teams met in the Conference Finals. The Knicks won the first two games, the Celtics won game 3, but the Knicks eliminated them with wins in Games 4 and 5. The Knicks went to the finals again but lost to the Lakers. In the 1972–73 season, the Knicks picked up Earl Monroe, who helped them go on another championship run. They beat Earl's old team, the Baltimore Bullets in round one, and met the Celtics in the Eastern Conference Finals. Boston won Game 1 at home, but the Knicks won the next three (Game 4 in 2OT). Boston fought back to tie the series at 3, but the Knicks routed them in Game 7 and went on to win their second NBA title. The teams met in the Conference Finals for the 3rd year in a row in the 1973–74 season. Boston won the series 4–1 and would go on to win their 12th NBA title. The Knicks era of greatness ended with the retirements of Reed and Frazier, and they went back to their old, familiar struggles. In the 1975–76 season, Dave Cowens, Jo Jo White, and the Celtics won another title.

1980s

The Knicks had minimal playoff success in the early to mid 1980s, despite Bernard King's great seasons in that time. In contrast, Larry Bird led Boston to titles in the 1980–81, 1983–84, and 1985–86 seasons. In 1984, they met in the Eastern Conference Semifinals. It was a hotly contested series that ended with a Boston win at home in Game 7 (the home team won every game) en route to the Celtics' title victory over the Lakers. In the 1987–88 season, they met in the first round of the playoffs. Boston won the first two at home, but the Knicks won Game 3, but Boston won Game 4 and the series. They made it to the Conference Finals but got eliminated by the Detroit Pistons.

1990s

The Celtics and Knicks met again in the first round of the 1990 NBA Playoffs, which the Knicks won 3–2. The two teams would not meet in the playoffs again until 2011. The 1991–92 season was the last season that the Celtics would reach the second round in the 1990s, while the Knicks made it to the second round or farther every year from 1992–2000. Under the leadership of Patrick Ewing and Anthony Mason, the Knicks experienced plenty of success including Eastern Conference titles in 1994 and 1999. However, they failed to win an NBA title. During this time, the Knicks' rivals included the Michael Jordan-led Chicago Bulls, as well as the Miami Heat and Indiana Pacers, all of whom faced the Knicks in multiple memorable playoff series during this time. After the 1999–2000 season, Ewing was traded to the Seattle SuperSonics. The Knicks descended into irrelevance and did not win a playoff series again until 2012.

2000s

The Knicks had a major collapse after the end of the Ewing era as they did not win a single playoff game from 2001 to 2012. The Celtics went into a new era under the leadership of Paul Pierce, who became team captain in 2003 and brought them back to the playoffs. In 2006, they drafted Rajon Rondo and in 2007, they acquired Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen, which formed their "big three." The trio helped the Celtics win their 17th NBA title in the 2007–08 season.

2010–present

In the summer of 2010, the New York Knicks signed Amar'e Stoudemire, formerly of the Phoenix Suns, who subsequently began rebuilding the team. Stoudemire averaged over 27 PPG in the 2010–11 season to help the Knicks clinch their first winning season since 2001. On February 21, 2011, the Knicks engaged in a high-profile trade with the Denver Nuggets to acquire superstar Carmelo Anthony. Those moves helped secure the Knicks' first playoff berth since 2004, where they were immediately swept by the Celtics. However, the Celtics would lose to the Miami Heat.

The 2012–13 season saw the Knicks flourish under the leadership of Anthony and offseason acquisition Tyson Chandler. Carmelo Anthony won the 2013 scoring title and helped them win the Atlantic Division for the first time since 1994. On January 7, 2013, the two teams played in New York. With 9 minutes remaining in the fourth quarter, a fight broke out on the court, triggered by animosity between Anthony and Boston's Kevin Garnett. After the fight was broken up, words continued to be exchanged, and after the game Carmelo attempted to go after Garnett in the locker rooms. This led to Carmelo being suspended for one game. Carmelo served his suspension on January 10 when the Knicks faced the Pacers. A rep for the league released a statement, saying, "There are no circumstances in which it is acceptable to confront an opponent after a game."[4][5] Both teams met again in the first round of the 2013 NBA Playoffs. The Celtics, who had lost Rajon Rondo to a mid-season injury, led the first two games going into halftime but were held to 25 and 23 points respectively in the second half to fall to 0–2. With the series shifting to Boston, the Knicks won Game 3, but Boston avoided elimination by winning Game 4 in Boston and Game 5 in New York. Game 6, played in Boston, featured the Knicks leading by 26 in the fourth quarter. The Celtics went on a 20–0 run in less than five minutes to make it a close game, but the Knicks held on to win their first playoff series since 2000. In the next round, the Knicks were beaten by the Indiana Pacers in 6 games.

Head to head

The results in brackets concern the playoff games.

Season at New York Knicks
Celtics–Knicks
at Boston Celtics
Knicks–Celtics
Neutral site
Knicks–Celtics
Total
Knicks–Celtics
1946–47 44–62, 58–45, 52–46 90–65, 62–66, 48–49 N.A. 2–4
1947–48 65–63, 58–70, 64–66, 68–80 91–75, 79–75, 74–58, 68–57 7–1
1948–49 64–81, 87–77, 61–66 75–77, 69–67, 56–70 3–3
1949–50 84–96, 80–82, 84–88 78–97, 81–72, 98–96 5–1
1950–51 89–83, 60–77, 75–76
(78–92)
90–93, 90–100, 85–87, 84–78
(83–69)
86–80 4–4
(2–0)
1951–52 70–68, 86–87, 83–91, 86–105
(97–101)
93–92, 94–103, 90–100, 95–100, 89–87
(94–105, 88–87)
N.A. 5–4
(2–1)
1952–53 68–79, 84–97, 69–76, 89–78
(91–95, 82–101)
100–103, 83–99, 79–87, 83–87
(70–86, 82–75)
112–89, 66–69 4–6
(3–1)
1953–54 113–108, 95–74, 85–87, 71–86
(93–71)
84–96, 87–84, 87–78, 89–103
(78–79)
103–92, 81–84 5–5
(0–2)
1954–55 117–98, 81–93, 83–88, 107–115, 95–114
(95–102, 116–109)
103–108, 96–113, 98–102, 105–103, 101–112
(101–122)
100–116, 97–95 6–6
(1–2)
1955–56 95–96, 95–92, 92–87, 102–113, 99–119 115–111, 100–102, 109–104, 104–114, 108–116 107–97, 103–86 7–5
1956–57 115–112, 99–110, 102–113, 114–111, 112–110 113–107, 78–114, 98–116, 85–97, 91–122 92–90, 122–121 5–7
1957–58 131–121, 103–106, 121–114, 113–111, 99–104 107–120, 110–120, 104–125, 119–126, 127–125 97–80, 136–123 5–7
1958–59 125–127, 109–90, 129–120, 124–116, 122–134 109–121, 106–135, 112–123, 129–126, 138–116 112–106, 78–109 5–7
1959–60 123–109, 128–127, 121–105, 123–119, 143–117, 129–125 107–122, 116–119, 126–144, 142–135, 128–148 126–137, 104–109 1–12
1960–61 110–101, 111–110, 115–117, 120–106, 125–112, 142–116 105–122, 124–142, 109–123, 129–107, 110–113 116–111, 120–124 3–10
1961–62 104–100, 117–109, 100–110, 121–129, 112–125, 106–113 102–132, 96–116, 111–122, 114–130 103–122, 104–127 4–8
1962–63 133–108, 116–102, 87–95, 124–100, 129–97, 102–95 116–149, 120–106, 110–123, 123–129, 117–122 98–117 2–10
1963–64 126–98, 132–113, 117–127, 127–133, 135–114, 114–102 116–133, 111–133, 102–115, 112–133, 121–127 140–143 2–10
1964–65 131–103, 117–113, 97–90, 113–123, 114–119 91–116, 95–123, 92–94 120–127, 113–112 3–7
1965–66 122–108, 99–96, 119107, 100–95, 126–113 110–125, 120–123, 115–118, 117–121, 104–140 N.A. 0–10
1966–67 126–97, 120–109, 114–112, 143–114, 140–123
(115–108, 118–109)
106–111, 106–141, 117–122, 113–124
(110–140, 123–112)
0–9
(1–3)
1967–68 105–110, 134–124, 112–108, 113–91 113–115, 114–120, 110–108, 91–103 2–6
1968–69 100–111, 82–109, 96–115
(108–100, 91–101, 104–112)
117–131, 104–98, 95–94, 92–88
(97–112, 96–97, 105–106)
6–1
(2–4)
1969–70 98–113, 111–104, 100–133, 125–118 102–109, 102–96, 112–115 3–4
1970–71 107–114, 107–128, 104–112 126–89, 118–111, 116–110 6–0
1971–72 101–106, 105–97, 106–109
(105–106, 98–116)
104–89, 116–122, 109–112
(116–94, 109–115, 111–103)
3–3
(4–1)
1972–73 94–97, 108–111, 91–123, 108–1O3
(96–129, 110–117, 110–100)
97–114, 106–115, 96–93, 107–122
(108–134, 98–91, 97–98, 94–78)
4–4
(4–3)
1973–74 94–84, 83–104, 104–88
(111–99, 98–91)
101–113, 97–119, 97–125, 108–102
(88–113, 103–100, 94–105)
2–5
(1–4)
1974–75 86–97, 109–91, 128–102, 126–111, 90–81 96–86, 88–105, 103–121, 86–96 2–7
1975–76 103–100, 106–98, 103–105 101–110, 112–120, 97–89, 94–100 2–5
1976–77 123–109, 113–121 123–109, 111–119 2–2
1977–78 119–122, 91–99 119–121, 94–112 2–2
1978–79 98–111, 106–102 98–109, 102–107 1–3
1979–80 109–113, 99–96, 123–120 97–100, 95–112, 121–129 1–5
1980–81 117–108, 93–89, 118–116 109–107, 106–120, 94–115 1–5
1981–82 83–103, 111–107, 110–106 99–131, 106–107, 99–119 1–5
1982–83 97–83, 105–113, 98–105 96–106, 122–110, 98–102 3–3
1983–84 113–117, 102–100, 108–100
(92–100, 113–118, 104–106)
110–103, 102–98, 96–102
(92–110, 102–116, 99–121, 104–121)
3–3
(3–4)
1984–85 126–108, 108–97, 110–102 99–115, 94–105, 102–114 0–6
1985–86 113–104, 104–113, 91–74 88–94, 108–115, 98–119 1–5
1986–87 107–96, 109–111, 120–128 90–101, 104–113, 107–119 2–4
1987–88 96–87, 98–106, 118–106
(100–109, 102–94)
109–111, 108–117, 93–95
(92–112, 102–128)
1–5
(1–3)
1988–89 107–109, 110–122, 117–137 115–122, 104–117, 111–115 3–3
1989–90 92–124, 115–110
(99–102, 108–135)
98–113, 91–97, 94–101
(105–116, 128–157, 121–114)
1–4
(3–2)
1990–91 106–103, 101–87, 117–101 86–113, 102–115 0–5
1991–92 101–111, 96–100 92–103, 95–99, 89–93 2–3
1992–93 80–85, 100–97, 88–110 113–87, 102–90 4–1
1993–94 79–114, 91–105 111–108, 90–83 4–0
1994–95 90–104, 110–115 120–107, 108–100, 99–92 5–0
1995–96 93–98, 93–97 105–92, 122–111 4–0
1996–97 99–112, 107–109 111–98, 113–102 4–0
1997–98 70–102, 82–98 85–94, 92–102 2–2
1998–99 78–96, 88–95 80–94 2–1
1999–00 97–99, 88–96 74–80, 85–112 2–2
2000–01 92–86, 88–95 103–101, 100–91 3–1
2001–02 102–93, 90–81 100–101, 92–107 0–4
2002–03 117–107, 113–90 80–91, 95–97 0–4
2003–04 86–89, 87–84 94–88, 92–74 3–1
2004–05 107–73, 82–107 109–114, 94–111 1–3
2005–06 102–99, 123–98 100–114, 101–86 1–3
2006–07 122–118, 97–90 101–77, 94–102 1–3
2007–08 109–93, 99–93 59–104, 103–111 0–4
2008–09 88–100, 110–100 101–110, 105–124 1–3
2009–10 107–105, 101–104 106–110, 97–109 1–3
2010–11 118–116, 96–86
(113–96, 101–89)
101–105, 102–112
(85–87, 93–96)
0–4
(0–4)
2011–12 104–106, 110–118 89–91, 111–115 2–2
2012–13 102–96, 89–108
(78–85, 71–87, 92–86)
89–86, 100–85
(90–76, 90–97, 88–80)
3–1
(4–2)
2013–14 114–73, 88–114 86–90, 116–92 2–2
2014–15 108–97, 96–92 101–95, 94–115 1–3
2015–16 114–120, 97–89 91–100, 104–105 1–3
2016–17 119–114, 110–94 87–115, 117–106 1–3
2017–18 93–102, 121–112 89–110, 73–103 1–3
2018–19 103–101, 113–99 117–109, 100–128 1–3

Statistics

New York Knicks Boston Celtics
Total wins 211 323
At New York Knicks 123 132
At Boston Celtics 75 179
Neutral site 13 12
Regular season wins 180 287
At New York Knicks 104 120
At Boston Celtics 63 155
Neutral site 13 12
Playoff wins 31 36
At New York Knicks 19 12
At Boston Celtics 12 24

References

  1. ^ a b Ryan, Bob (December 15, 2010). "Another link in the chain". Boston Globe. p. C1. The Knicks...take on the Boston Celtics—a rival in one form or another for the entirety of the league's existence.
  2. ^ Steinberg, Dan (February 2, 2008). "Baseball's Fault Lines Show Stress In Arizona". The Washington Post. p. E11.
  3. ^ Walker, Ben (January 27, 2008). "Super Bowl highlights super rivalry: Beantown vs. Big Apple". NFL.com. National Football League. Associated Press. Archived from the original on 2012-11-06. Retrieved 2012-09-20. With New York Yankees-Red Sox, that's just the way New York-Boston sports are...Be it on the field, court, diamond or ice, that's how it is between Beantown and the Big Apple.
  4. ^ "Carmelo Anthony SUSPENDED for Post-Game Clash with Kevin Garnett". TMZ.com. 2013-01-09. Retrieved 2014-03-12.
  5. ^ NBA Lead Writer (2013-05-02). "Postgame Fight Shows How Much Boston Celtics, NY Knicks Hate Each Other". Bleacher Report. Retrieved 2014-03-12.
1951 NBA playoffs

The 1951 NBA playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Association 1950–51 season. The tournament concluded with the Western Division champion Rochester Royals defeating the Eastern Division champion New York Knicks 4 games to 3 in the NBA Finals.

The eight qualified teams began tournament play on Tuesday and Wednesday, March 20 and 21, and the Finals concluded on Saturday, April 21. Rochester and New York played 14 games in a span of 33 days; their seven final games in fifteen days.The Rochester Royals (now the Sacramento Kings) were "royalty" in their first nine seasons, from 1945–46 to 1954–54 always one of the strong teams in their league. Rochester had played three seasons in the National Basketball League, winning the 1946 NBL championship and losing the Finals in 1947 and 1948. In one BAA and one NBA season, the team had won 75% of its games before losing in the second round, then first round, of the 1949 and 1950 playoffs. The 1950–51 team won more than 60% of its games, as the Royals would do for three more seasons, and participated in the club's only NBA Finals. That remains true more than 60 years later, covering stints in Rochester, Cincinnati, Kansas City, and Sacramento.

The New York Knicks were an original Basketball Association of America franchise, now in its sixth season and participating in the BAA or NBA Finals for the first time. It would be the first three consecutive years as losing finalist.

Another six-year-old, original BAA team, the Boston Celtics had qualified only for the 1948 BAA Playoffs. Now the second-place Eastern Division team, Boston had earned home-court advantage for a first-round series with third-place New York. It was the first playoff meeting in the Celtics–Knicks rivalry and it would be the first of 19 consecutive years in the playoffs.

List of National Basketball Association rivalries

Throughout more than 70 seasons, the National Basketball Association (NBA) has had many intense rivalries. This article lists some of the famous rivalries in the NBA. Rivalries are classified into three primary groups; intradivisional, interdivisional, and interconference.

Interconference rivalries comprise games between opponents in different conferences. A team plays each opponent from the other conference in one home game and one away game.

Intradivisional rivalries comprise games between opponents in the same division. Since the 2004–05 NBA season, there are 30 teams in six divisions of 5 teams each. Each team plays each division opponent 4 times during the regular season (twice at home, twice away) for a total of 16 games out of 82 total regular season games.

Interdivisional rivalries comprise games between opponents in different divisions but within the same conference. A team plays against each team from the other two divisions in its conference either three or four times. The total interdivisional games an NBA team plays is 36. Conference games are often important, as a team's record in common games, as well as its overall record against its conference, are sometimes used as tiebreakers for playoff seeding at the end of the regular season. Also, many regular season opponents have met again in the playoffs, and the result of a regular season game can affect where the playoff game will be played.

National Hockey League rivalries

Rivalries in the National Hockey League have occurred between many teams and cities. Rivalries have arisen for many different reasons, the primary ones including geographic proximity, familiarity with opponents, on-ice incidents, and cultural, linguistic, or national pride.

The importance of these various factors has varied widely throughout the history of the league.

Yankees–Red Sox rivalry

The Yankees–Red Sox rivalry is a Major League Baseball (MLB) rivalry between the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox. The two teams have competed in MLB's American League (AL) for over 100 seasons and have since developed one of the fiercest rivalries in American sports. In 1919, Red Sox owner Harry Frazee sold star player Babe Ruth to the Yankees, which was followed by an 86-year period in which the Red Sox did not win a World Series. This led to the popularization of a superstition known as the "Curse of the Bambino", which was one of the most well-known aspects of the rivalry.The rivalry is often a heated subject of conversation, especially in the home region of both teams, the Northeastern United States.

Until the 2014 season, every season's postseason had featured one or both of the AL East rivals since the inception of the wild card format and the resultant additional Division Series; they have faced each other in the AL Championship Series (ALCS) three times. The Yankees won twice, in 1999 and 2003; while the Red Sox won in 2004. The two teams have also met once in the AL Division Series (ALDS), in 2018, with Boston winning 3-1, a series which included a 16-1 Red Sox win in Game 3 at Yankee Stadium, the most lopsided postseason loss for the Yankees in their history. In addition, the teams have twice met in the last regular-season series of a season to decide the league title, in 1904 (when the Red Sox, then known as the Americans, won) and 1949 (when the Yankees won).The Yankees and the Red Sox finished tied for first in 1978; subsequently, the Yankees won a high-profile tie-breaker game for the division title. The first-place tie came after the Red Sox had a 14-game lead over the Yankees more than halfway through the season. Similarly, in the 2004 ALCS, the Yankees ultimately lost a best-of-7 series after leading 3–0. The Red Sox comeback was the only time in baseball history that a team has come back from a 0–3 deficit to win a series. The Red Sox went on to win the World Series, ending the 86-year-old curse.This match-up is regarded by some sports journalists as the greatest rivalry in sports. Games between the two teams often generate considerable interest and receive extensive media coverage, including being broadcast on national television. National carriers of Major League Baseball coverage, including Fox/FS1, ESPN, and MLB Network carry most of the games in the rivalry across the nation, regardless of team standings or playoff implications. Yankees–Red Sox games are some of the most-watched MLB games each season. Outside of baseball, the rivalry has led to violence between fans, along with attention from politicians and other athletes.

Franchise
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Culture and lore
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G League affiliate
Retired numbers
NBA Championships
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Culture and lore
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