Cecil Isbell

Cecil Frank Isbell (July 11, 1915 – June 23, 1985) was an American football Quarterback and coach. He played five years in the National Football League (NFL) with the Green Bay Packers, leading them to the NFL Championship in 1939. He retired after the 1942 season to become an assistant coach at his alma mater, Purdue University, and the following year became its head coach for three seasons.[1][2]

Isbell was the head coach of the Baltimore Colts of the All-America Football Conference from 1947 to 1949, resigning after four winless games.[3] He then became an assistant under former head coach Curly Lambeau, now with the Chicago Cardinals. When Lambeau resigned late in the 1951 season, Isbell was the interim head coach for the final two games, which they split. Isbell's pro head coaching record was 10–23–1. He was hired as an assistant coach with the Dallas Texans if the NFL in 1952. Isbell was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1967.

Cecil Isbell
No. 17
Cecil Isbell
circa 1937
Born:July 11, 1915
Houston, Texas
Died:June 23, 1985 (aged 69)
Hammond, Indiana
Career information
Position(s)Tailback
Height6 ft 1 in (185 cm)
Weight190 lb (86 kg)
CollegePurdue
NFL draft1938 / Round: 1 / Pick 7
Career history
As coach
1943Purdue (assistant)
1944–1946Purdue
1947–1949Baltimore Colts
1950–1951Chicago Cardinals (OC/QB/RB)
1952Dallas Texans (backfield)
1953LSU (backfield)
As player
1938–1942Green Bay Packers
Career highlights and awards
Career stats
Games played54
TDINT61–52
Passing yards5,945
Passer rating72.6
Rushing attempts422
Rushing yards1,522

Early life and college playing career

Born in Houston, Texas, Isbell was the second son of Adger and Sarah Isbell. His older brother Cody was also a football player for Purdue and his two younger brothers also played college football: William Adger "Dub" Isbell Jr. at Rice Institute and Larry Isbell at Baylor University.

Isbell attended Sam Houston High School in Houston, then went to Purdue, where played from 1935 through 1937. He was voted the Boilermakers' most valuable player for the 1937 season. In the summer of 1938, he led the College All-Stars to victory over the defending NFL champion Washington Redskins at Soldier Field in Chicago. Isbell was named the game's MVP as the All-Stars prevailed, 28–16.[4]

NFL playing career

Isbell was selected in the first round of the 1938 NFL draft by the Green Bay Packers, the seventh overall pick. When he arrived in Green Bay, the Packers already had an All-Pro tailback, Arnie Herber. who had led the Packers to the NFL championship in 1936. Coach Curly Lambeau alternated Isbell and Herber and occasionally used them in the same backfield, with Isbell at halfback. This "platooning" allowed Isbell to learn Lambeau's offense, the Notre Dame Box. Isbell was a very accurate passer and a good runner and he led the Packers in rushing and passing in his rookie year. The Packers came in first in the West and faced the New York Giants in the championship game at the Polo Grounds. Isbell rushed 11 times for 20 yards and was 3 of 5 passing for 91 yards, but the Giants prevailed, 23–17. In 1939, the Packers used the same attack and again Isbell led the team in rushing while catching 9 passes as well. The Packers again won the Western division and faced New York in a rematch from the year before. This time the game was played in Milwaukee and Green Bay crushed the Giants, 27–0, with Isbell throwing a 27-yard touchdown pass.

From 1940 to 1942, the Packers finished second in the West to the Chicago Bears each year. Isbell became a more accomplished passer during this time, connecting regularly with Don Hutson in record-setting frequency. In 1941, Isbell set an NFL record for yards passing with 1,479 and led the league in completion percentage (56.8%) and touchdown passes with 15 (10 to Hutson).[5] The Packers finished the season tied with Chicago, but lost to the Bears in a divisional tiebreaker playoff, 33–14. In 1942, Isbell surpassed his own record with 2021 yards passing and set a new record with 24 touchdown passes. Hutson also set NFL records with 74 receptions, 1,211 yards receiving and 17 touchdowns (Hutson's touchdown mark was matched by Elroy Hirsch in 1951 and stood until 1984). Still, the Packers finished second to Chicago, who were 11–0 in the regular season.

After the 1942 season, Isbell quit the NFL after just 5 years,[6] He finished with 5,945 yards passing, 61 touchdowns, and 52 interceptions.

Former NFL & Green Bay Packers record

The Professional Football Researchers Association named Isbell to the PRFA Hall of Very Good Class of 2008 [11] Isbell is one of ten players that were named to the National Football League 1930s All-Decade Team that have not been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Coaching career

Isbell started out at Purdue as an assistant coach in 1943 and took over as head coach in 1944. He coached there for three years with a 14–14–1 record. In 1947, he became a pro coach for the Baltimore Colts in the All-America Football Conference.[12] He lasted for 2⅔ seasons, resigning prior to the fifth game in 1949.[3] His one claim to fame from those years in the AAFC was he was the first coach of Y. A. Tittle, who went on to great success in the NFL. After a few more years as an assistant coach in the NFL coaching the Chicago Cardinals under head coach Curly Lambeau, and later the Dallas Texans, Isbell quit football for business in the mid 1950s.

Honors and death

Isbell was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1967. On June 23, 1985, Isbell died in Hammond, Indiana. His tombstone gives his name as Cecil Fay Isbell.

Head coaching record

College

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Purdue Boilermakers (Big Ten Conference) (1944–1946)
1944 Purdue 5–5 4–2 3rd
1945 Purdue 7–3 3–3 T–4th
1946 Purdue 2–6–1 0–5–1 9th
Purdue: 14–14–1 7–10–1
Total: 14–14–1

Pro

Team League Year Regular Season Post Season
Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
BCL AAFC 1947 2 11 1 .154 4th in AAFC East
BCL AAFC 1948 7 7 0 .500 T–1st in AAFC East 0 1 .000 Lost to Buffalo Bills in Division Playoff.
BCL AAFC 1949 0 4 0 .000 6th in AAFC
CRD NFL 1951 1 1 0 .500 6th in AAFC
BCL Total 9 22 1 .290 0 1 .000
CRD Total 1 1 0 .500
Total[13] 10 23 1 .303 0 1 .000

References

  1. ^ "Packer hall of famer Cecil Isbell, 69, dies". Milwaukee Sentinel. June 24, 1985. p. 1, part 2.
  2. ^ "Ex-Packer star Isbell dies". Milwaukee Journal. Associated Press. June 24, 1985. p. 1, part 3.
  3. ^ a b "Isbell resigns at Baltimore". St. Petersburg Times. Florida. Associated Press. September 23, 1949. p. 26.
  4. ^ "Collegians whip Redskins eleven". Tuscaloowa News. Alabama. Associated Press. September 1, 1938. p. 11.
  5. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/I/IsbeCe20.htm
  6. ^ "Cecil Isbell may close grid career as all-star". Milwaukee Journal. United Press. December 22, 1942. p. 8, part 2.
  7. ^ "Broken record sounds fine to Unitas' former teammates". Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 2012-01-09.
  8. ^ "Cecil Isbell" (PDF). The Coffin Corner. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 24, 2012. Retrieved 2012-01-09.
  9. ^ Favre, Packers have blast in San Diego, whip Chargers
  10. ^ Rivers passes through
  11. ^ "Hall of Very Good Class of 2008". Retrieved November 23, 2016.
  12. ^ "Isbell moves to pro team". Milwaukee Journal. Associated Press. February 10, 1947. p. 6, part 2.
  13. ^ Cecil Isbell Record, Statistics, and Category Ranks – Pro-Football-Reference.com

External links

1936 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1936 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams chosen by various selectors for the 1936 Big Ten Conference football season.

1937 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1937 Big Ten Conference football season was the 42nd season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1937 college football season.

The 1937 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team, under head coach Bernie Bierman, won the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring offense (23.0 points per game), compiled a 6–2 record, and was ranked No. 5 in the final AP poll. End Ray King was named a first-team All-American by two selectors, and fullback Andy Uram was received first-team honors from the Associated Press. Halfback Rudy Gmitro was awarded the team's most valuable player award.

The 1937 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Francis Schmidt finished in second place with a 6–2 record, shut out six of eight opponents, led the Big Ten in scoring defense (2.9 points allowed per game), and was ranked No. 8 in the final AP poll. Guard Gust Zarnas was selected as a first-team All-American by three selectors. Back Jim McDonald was the second player selected in the 1938 NFL Draft.

Corbett Davis of Indiana won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the Big Ten's most valuable player. He was also the first player selected in the 1938 NFL Draft.

1941 All-Pro Team

The 1941 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1941 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the so-called "official" All-Pro team selected by a committee of professional football writers for the NFL (NFL), the sports writers of the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), Collyer's Eye (CE), the New York Daily News (NYDN), and the Chicago Herald American.Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Five players were named to the first team by all six selectors: Green Bay Packers halfback Cecil Isbell; Chicago Bears halfback George McAfee; Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson; Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann; and Chicago Bears center Bulldog Turner.

1942 All-Pro Team

The 1942 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players who were chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team for the 1942 football season. Teams were selected by, among others, the "official" All-Pro team announced by the NFL and selected by a committee of nine reporters (NFL), the Associated Press (AP), the International News Service (INS), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).

1942 Green Bay Packers season

The 1942 Green Bay Packers season was their 24th season overall and their 22nd season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–2–1 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a second-place finish in the Western Conference.

1944 Purdue Boilermakers football team

The 1944 Purdue Boilermakers football team was an American football team that represented Purdue University during the 1944 Big Ten Conference football season. In their first season under head coach Cecil Isbell, the Boilermakers compiled a 5–5 record, finished in third place in the Big Ten Conference with a 4–2 record against conference opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 207 to 166.Notable players from the 1944 Purdue team included fullback Babe Dimancheff, end Frank Bauman, and tackle Pat O'Brien.

1945 Purdue Boilermakers football team

The 1945 Purdue Boilermakers football team was an American football team that represented Purdue University during the 1945 Big Ten Conference football season. In their second season under head coach Cecil Isbell, the Boilermakers compiled a 7–3 record, finished in fifth place in the Big Ten Conference with a 3–3 record against conference opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 198 to 125.Notable players from the 1945 Purdue team included halfbacks Ed Cody and Bob DeMoss.

1946 Purdue Boilermakers football team

The 1946 Purdue Boilermakers football team was an American football team that represented Purdue University during the 1946 Big Ten Conference football season. In their third season under head coach Cecil Isbell, the Boilermakers compiled a 2–6–1 record, finished in last place in the Big Ten Conference with an 0–5–1 record against conference opponents, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 208 to 97.Notable players from the 1946 Purdue team included guard Dick Barwegen.

Arnie Herber

Arnold Charles Herber (April 2, 1910 – October 14, 1969) was a professional quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Green Bay Packers and New York Giants. He was inducted to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1966.

Dave McGinnis

David McGinnis (born August 7, 1951) is an American football coach and former college player who was the assistant head coach of the Los Angeles Rams from 2012 to 2016. He was also previously the head coach of the NFL's Arizona Cardinals from 2000 through 2003.

Dewey Scanlon

Dewey D. Scanlon (August 16, 1899 – September 24, 1944) was an American football coach, and was the head coach for the National Football League's Duluth Kelleys/Eskimos from 1924 to 1926 and for the Chicago Cardinals in 1929. As an NFL head coach, he compiled a record of 17–15–4 in four seasons. He also appeared in one game as a wingback for Duluth in 1926. Scanlon was born in Duluth, Minnesota and attended Valparaiso University.

Fred Gillies

Frederick Montague Gillies (December 9, 1895 – May 8, 1974) was an American football player and coach for the Chicago Cardinals of the National Football League. He graduated from Cornell University in 1918 and was a member of the Quill and Dagger society. He appeared in 72 games, 51 of which as a starter, as a tackle for the Chicago Cardinals between 1920 and 1933, earning All-Pro honors in 1922. He coached the team in 1928, which was his final season as a player and only as a coach, to a 1-5 record.

Fred later married Blanche Wilderand and adopted Theo Janet Howells, the biological daughter of Blanche's sister, Gertrude Wilder. Gillies also worked and volunteered for the Republican Party.

In 1932, he was a survivor in a plane crash that took the life of aviator Eddie Stinson, the founder of Stinson Aircraft Company. Gillies suffered a leg injury, as a result of the accident, which left him in a leg brace for the rest of his life.

Hank Kuhlmann

Henry N. "Hank" Kuhlmann (born October 6, 1937) is a former American football coach, and was the interim head coach for the National Football League's Phoenix Cardinals for part of the 1989 season. He assumed the position after Gene Stallings resigned in November. Kuhlmann finished with an 0-5 record, and was replaced by Joe Bugel before the start of the following season.Kuhlmann played fullback for the Missouri Tigers football team from 1956 to 1958 under coaches Don Faurot, Frank Broyles, and Dan Devine. He led the Tigers in rushing and in scoring the 1956 and 1957 seasons and also led the team in interceptions in 1956. Kuhlmann received All-Big Eight Conference honors in 1957.Kuhlmann also played catcher for the Missouri Tigers baseball team. In 1958, he was named to the All College World Series team, helping the Tigers to a national runner-up finish.Upon graduation from Missouri, Kuhlmann signed with the St. Louis Cardinals, spending four years in the minor leagues. He then returned to Missouri, where he served as an assistant coach under Devine before accompanying Devine to the Green Bay Packers and Notre Dame Fighting Irish.In 2010, Kuhlmann was inducted into the University of Missouri Intercollegiate Athletics Hall of Fame.

Larry Wilson (American football)

Larry Frank Wilson (born March 24, 1938) is a former professional football player, an eight-time Pro Bowl free safety with the St. Louis Cardinals of the National Football League. He played his entire 13-year career with the Cardinals and remained on the team's payroll until 2003, long after the team moved to Arizona in 1988.Wilson was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1978, his first year of eligibility, and was named to the NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team in 1994.

LeRoy Andrews

LeRoy B. Andrews, or commonly Roy Andrews, (born June 27, 1896) was an American football player and coach. He played college football at Pittsburg State University. In 1923, he played for the St. Louis All Stars. From 1924 to 1927, he was a player-coach for the Kansas City Blues/Cowboys and the Cleveland Bulldogs. From 1928 to 1931, he coached the Detroit Wolverines, the New York Giants, and the Chicago Cardinals.

List of Green Bay Packers starting quarterbacks

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. They are members of the North Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) and are the third-oldest franchise in the National Football League (NFL). The club was founded in 1919 by coach, player, and future Hall of Fame inductee Curly Lambeau and sports and telegraph editor George Whitney Calhoun. The Packers competed against local teams for two seasons before entering the NFL in 1921.

The Packers have had 46 starting quarterbacks (QB) in the history of their franchise. The Packers' past starting quarterbacks include Pro Football Hall of Fame inductees Curly Lambeau, Tony Canadeo, Arnie Herber, Bart Starr and Brett Favre. The team's first starting quarterback was Norm Barry, while the longest serving was Brett Favre. The Packers' starting quarterback for the 2018 season was Aaron Rodgers, who was playing in his 14th season in the NFL.

They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Packers.

List of Purdue Boilermakers football seasons

The Purdue Boilermakers, a college football team based in Indiana, has competed every season since 1889. The team has played in the Indiana Intercollegiate Athletic Association, the Western Conference and the Big Ten Conference. It last took a Conference title in 2000.

Norman Barry

Norman Christopher Barry (December 25, 1897 – October 13, 1988) was an American judge, politician, and football coach.

Phil Handler

Philip Jacob Handler (July 21, 1908 – December 8, 1968) was an American football player and coach who spent his entire professional career in the city of Chicago. He had a seven-year, 53-game NFL playing career, during which he was named All-Pro four times. On three separate occasions, Handler served as head coach of the Chicago Cardinals, and later as an assistant coach for the Chicago Bears. He served as an assistant coach for the Cardinals when they won the 1947 NFL Championship; and with the Bears when they won the 1963 NFL Championship.

Cecil Isbell—championships, awards, and honors

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.