Cecil Cooper

Cecil Celester Cooper (born December 20, 1949) is a former first baseman in Major League Baseball and the former manager of the Houston Astros.[1] From 1971 through 1987, Cooper played for the Boston Red Sox (1971–76) and Milwaukee Brewers (1977–87). He batted and threw left-handed, and attended Prairie View A&M University in Prairie View, Texas.

Cecil Cooper
IMG 8758 Cecil Cooper
Cooper as coach for the Houston Astros in 2007
First baseman / Manager
Born: December 20, 1949 (age 69)
Brenham, Texas
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
September 8, 1971, for the Boston Red Sox
Last MLB appearance
July 12, 1987, for the Milwaukee Brewers
MLB statistics
Batting average.298
Home runs241
Runs batted in1,125
Managerial record171–170
Winning %.501
Teams
As player
As manager
Career highlights and awards

Playing career

In a 17-season career, Cooper posted a .298 batting average with 241 home runs and 1125 runs batted in in 1896 games. He was No. 17 with the Boston Red Sox, and No. 15 with the Milwaukee Brewers.

Cooper was selected by the Boston Red Sox in the 1968 draft and made his Major League debut with the Red Sox in 1972. Before the 1977 season, he was sent to the Milwaukee Brewers in the same trade that brought George Scott back to Boston.

After being traded to the Brewers, Cooper altered his batting stance to one that was similar to the stance of Rod Carew, leaning far back on his left foot and his arms partially extended. The stance helped Cooper in hitting outside pitches to the opposite field, while still pulling inside pitches. The stance change was effective, as Cooper batted .302 as a Brewer, compared to a .283 average he had during his time in Boston.

Cecil Cooper 1976
Cooper in 1976

A five-time All-Star, Cooper hit .300 or more from 1977 to 1983. His most productive season came in 1980, when he hit a career-high .352 (finishing second in the American League behind batting champion George Brett's .390 average for the Kansas City Royals), and he also led the league in RBIs (122) and total bases (335).

In 1983 Cooper hit .307 with 30 home runs and a league-leading and career-high 126 RBIs. He also posted three seasons with 200-plus hits, in 1980, 1982 and 1983, finished fifth in the AL MVP vote, and was named the Brewers' team MVP in three seasons (1980, 1982–83). An excellent defensive first baseman, he was a two-time Gold Glove winner (1979–80). He also won the Silver Slugger Award in three straight years (1980–82); the only other Brewer to have done so is Ryan Braun (2008–10).

Cooper concluded his Major League career with 11 seasons as a Brewer, including an appearance in the 1982 World Series. Cooper holds the Milwaukee franchise records for hits (219 in 1980). Cooper held the team record for RBIs in a season with 126 until Prince Fielder broke that record on September 19, 2009 against the Houston Astros, who Cooper was managing at the time. Through 2011 he was one of three Brewers who have had four 100-RBI seasons, along with Prince Fielder and Ryan Braun.[2]

In 1983 he was honored with the Roberto Clemente Award, and in 2002 he was inducted into the Brewers Walk of Fame.

Following the conclusion of his playing career, he worked in several capacities in the Brewers organization. He was named bench coach for Milwaukee in 2002 and also managed the Triple-A Indianapolis Indians in 200304. He returned to the Major League coaching ranks in 2005 as a bench coach for the Houston Astros.

On August 27, 2007, he was named the interim manager of the Astros following the firing of Phil Garner, making him the first African American field manager in Astros' history. Cooper's previous managerial experience was at Class AAA Indianapolis, the Milwaukee Brewers' top farm club. Cooper had a record of 130–156, finishing fourth in 2003 and third in 2004. On September 28, 2007, Cooper's interim tag was dropped and he became the Astros' 16th manager. Cooper was released as Astros manager on September 21, 2009.[1]

Cooper was elected to the Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame in 2007.

He lives now in Katy, Texas with his wife Octavia and daughter Tori. He has two other grown daughters, Kelly and Brittany.

Managerial record

Team Year Regular season Post season
Won Lost Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
HOU 2007 15 16 .484 4th in NL Central
2008 86 75 .534 3rd in NL Central
2009 70 79 .470 4th in NL Central Fired
Total 171 170 .501

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Astros ax Cooper; Clark takes over". Associated Press via ESPN.com. September 21, 2009. Retrieved September 21, 2009.
  2. ^ [1]

External links

1968 Major League Baseball draft

The 1968 Major League Baseball (MLB) draft took place prior to the 1968 MLB season. The draft saw the New York Mets take shortstop Tim Foli first overall.

1978 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1978 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers finishing third in the American League East with a record of 93 wins and 69 losses.

1979 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1979 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers' finishing second in the American League East with a record of 95 wins and 66 losses.

1980 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1980 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers' finishing third in the American League East with a record of 86 wins and 76 losses. The Brewers hit eight grand slams, the most in MLB in 1980.

1982 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1982 Milwaukee Brewers season resulted in the team winning its first and only American League Championship.

As a team, the Brewers led Major League Baseball in a number of offensive categories, including at bats (5733), runs scored (891), home runs (216), runs batted in (843), slugging percentage (.455), on-base plus slugging (.789), total bases (2606) and extra-base hits (534).

1982 World Series

The 1982 World Series featured the St. Louis Cardinals and the Milwaukee Brewers, with the Cardinals winning in seven games.

The Cardinals had last been in the World Series in 1968, and a Milwaukee team, the Braves, in 1958. The Milwaukee team of 1982 started as an expansion team in Seattle in 1969, which then moved to Milwaukee in 1970 and changed their name to the Brewers.The Cardinals made it to the Series by winning the National League East division by three games over the Philadelphia Phillies, and then defeating the Atlanta Braves by 3 games to none in the National League Championship Series. The Brewers made it by winning the American League East division by one game over the Baltimore Orioles, and then defeating the California Angels by 3 games to 2 in the American League Championship Series.

With the Cardinals winning this series, the National League achieved four straight World Series championships from 1979 to 1982. The National League would not again achieve even back-to-back victories until the Giants won in 2010 and the Cardinals in 2011.

Though the teams had never met before, their home cities had an existing commercial rivalry in the beer market, as St. Louis is the home of Anheuser–Busch, which owned the Cardinals at the time, while Milwaukee is the home of Miller Brewing and other past major competitors of Anheuser–Busch. This led the media to refer to it as the "Suds Series."

1993 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1993 followed the system in place since 1978.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected Reggie Jackson.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro Leagues.

It selected no one.

Alfred Cooper (cricketer)

Alfred Henry Cecil Cooper (2 September 1893 – 18 July 1963) was a South African cricketer who played a single Test match for the South African national side during the 1913–14 season. Domestically, he played for Transvaal (now Gauteng) from 1912 to 1928.

Cooper was born in Johannesburg in September 1893, in what was then the independent South African Republic. His father, Alfred Edward Cooper (1869–1960), played first-class cricket for Transvaal and Griqualand West. The junior Alfred Cooper made his first-class debut in December 1912, for Transvaal against Orange Free State during the 1912–13 season of the Currie Cup. A right-handed top-order batsman, he scored 244 runs from four matches in his debut season, including two half-centuries. The following season, in November 1913, Cooper appeared for Transvaal in a match against a team led by former national captain Percy Sherwell. In the match, which served as a trial match for the upcoming Test series against England, he scored 109 runs in 90 minutes, his maiden first-class century. Cooper was consequently selected in the South African side for the First Test against England, played at Lord's, Durban. He came in sixth in each innings of what was to be his only Test, and was twice dismissed by Sydney Barnes, recording six runs in the first innings and a duck in the second.Although Cooper, aged only 20 at the time of his debut, did not feature in the remainder of the Test series, he did play twice against the Englishmen for Transvaal. After the First World War, first-class cricket in South Africa did not resume until the 1919–20 season, when an Australian Imperial Forces side toured, featuring a number of past and future Australian Test players. Cooper played two matches for Transvaal against the AIF, and later represented South Africa against the Australians in what was termed an "unofficial Test", played at the Wanderers ground in Johannesburg in November 1919. The Currie Cup resumed during the 1920–21 season, after a seven-season hiatus. Cooper played regularly for Transvaal during the 1920s, and had a particularly strong 1921–22 season, scoring 352 runs from six matches, including a century. Against Western Province during the 1923–24 season, he scored 171 not out, his highest first-class score, to help Transvaal win by an innings and 54 runs.Transvaal won the Currie Cup three times while Cooper was a part of the team – the 1923–24 edition, and the consecutive 1925–26 and 1926–27 editions. Cooper's final first-class appearance came in December 1928, against Border (the 1928–29 season being one when the Currie Cup was not contested). In that match, aged 35, he was named Transvaal's captain for the only time in his career, substituting for usual captain Nummy Deane. Cooper opened the bowling alongside Charles Cawse in Border's second innings (after following on), and took 3/9, his best first-class figures. He had previously bowled only irregularly.

Cecil Cooper (bishop)

Alfred Cecil Cooper was the fourth Anglican Bishop in Korea from 1931 until 1954. Born in 1882 and educated at Bradfield College and Christ's College, Cambridge, he was ordained in 1907. After a curacy at St Oswald's, West Hartlepool he spent the rest of his active ministry in Korea. Bishop during a turbulent period in the country’s history, the most dramatic event of his episcopate was the forced march to the very top of the country during the Korean war. During his capture, 1951–1953, his assistant bishop, Arthur Chadwell, was acting bishop diocesan. Retiring in 1954, he died a decade later on 17 December 1964.

Cecil Cooper (priest)

The Very Rev Cecil Henry Hamilton Cooper (1871 – 6 January 1942) was Dean of Carlisle from 1933 to 1938.

Born into an ecclesiastical family in 1871, he was educated at Pocklington School and Keble College, Oxford and ordained in 1895. After curacies at St Mary’s Alverstoke and St Faith with St Cross Hospital, Winchester he held incumbencies in Winchester and Scarborough before being appointed Archdeacon of York in 1923. A decade later he was elevated to the Deanery, retiring in 1938. He died on 6 January 1942.

Harry Dalton

Harry I. Dalton (August 23, 1928 – October 23, 2005) was an American front-office executive in Major League Baseball. He served as general manager of three American League teams, the Baltimore Orioles (1966–71), California Angels (1972–77) and Milwaukee Brewers (1978–91), and was a principal architect of the Orioles' dynasty of 1966–74 as well as the only AL championship the Brewers ever won (1982).

Born in West Springfield, Massachusetts—also the hometown of Baseball Hall of Fame manager Leo Durocher—Dalton graduated from Amherst College and served in the United States Air Force during the Korean War, earning a Bronze Star. After a brief stint as a sportswriter in Springfield, he joined the front office of the Orioles, newly reborn as the relocated St. Louis Browns, in 1954. For the next 11 years, Dalton worked his way up the organizational ladder, rising to the position of director of the Orioles' successful farm system in 1961.In the autumn of 1965, Baltimore general manager Lee MacPhail departed to become top aide to the new Commissioner of Baseball, William Eckert. Dalton was named Director of Player Personnel—in effect, MacPhail's successor. His first order of business was to complete a trade that brought Cincinnati Reds outfielder Frank Robinson to Baltimore for pitchers Milt Pappas and Jack Baldschun and a minor league outfielder. Robinson, 1961 National League Most Valuable Player, was one of the greatest stars in the game, but he had developed a strained relationship with the Cincinnati front office. In Baltimore, he would team with third baseman Brooks Robinson to lead the O's to the 1966 and 1970 World Series championships, and pennants in 1969 and 1971. Dalton was the man who hired Earl Weaver as manager, brought to the Majors young stars such as Bobby Grich and Don Baylor, and acquired key players such as Mike Cuellar, Pat Dobson and Don Buford. (Weaver, Frank Robinson and Brooks Robinson, along with pitching great Jim Palmer, a product of Dalton's farm system, are all in the Hall in Fame.)

After the Orioles lost the 1971 World Series to the Pittsburgh Pirates, Dalton was hired to turn around a stumbling Angels franchise. He acquired the great pitcher Nolan Ryan in a December 1971 trade with the New York Mets, but during Dalton's six seasons in Anaheim the team never posted a winning record. After the 1977 season, the Angels hired veteran executive Buzzie Bavasi as Dalton's boss, then released Dalton from his contract so that he could become the general manager of the Brewers.

Milwaukee had a group of talented young players, such as Robin Yount, Cecil Cooper and rookie Paul Molitor, but the nine-year-old franchise had never had a winning season. In 1978, Dalton hired George Bamberger, Weaver's pitching coach for many years, as the Brewers' new manager, and the team gelled into contenders in the American League East Division. By 1981, they made the playoffs and in 1982, Milwaukee won its first and only American League pennant (the Brewers moved to the National League Central Division in 1998). In the 1982 World Series, the "Harvey's Wallbangers" Brewers of manager Harvey Kuenn lost to the St. Louis Cardinals in seven games.

The Brewers contended in 1983, but then began to struggle on the field. The team rebounded in 1987 and 1988, but when it returned to its losing ways, Dalton's position was weakened. After a poor 1991 season, he was replaced as general manager by Sal Bando. Dalton, who remained a consultant in the Milwaukee front office through his 1994 retirement, nevertheless was one of the most respected men in baseball, who had trained other successful general managers such as John Schuerholz, Lou Gorman and Dan Duquette, a fellow Amherst alumnus.On July 24, 2003, Dalton was inducted into the Milwaukee Brewers Walk of Fame outside Miller Park.

Harry Dalton died at age 77 in Scottsdale, Arizona, of complications from Lewy body disease, misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s disease.

List of Milwaukee Brewers award winners and All-Stars

The Milwaukee Brewers professional baseball franchise dates to its 1969 founding in Washington as the Seattle Pilots. In 1970 the team relocated to Wisconsin, settling in Milwaukee.

In 1998, the team moved from the American League to the National League.This list, which is correct as of the end of the 2014 season, documents Pilots and Brewers players who have won league awards or were selected for mid-season Major League Baseball All-Star Game teams.

List of Milwaukee Brewers seasons

The Milwaukee Brewers are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. They play in the National League Central division. Established in Seattle, Washington as the Seattle Pilots in 1969, the team became the Milwaukee Brewers after relocating to Milwaukee the following season. The franchise played in the American League until 1998, when it moved to the National League as part of an MLB realignment plan.As of the completion of the game against the Pittsburgh Pirates on September 3, 2016 (Which resulted in a 7-4 victory), the franchise has played in 7,616 regular season games and compiled a win–loss record of 3,628–3,988. They have a postseason record of 14–18.The Brewers have figured in the MLB postseason picture on five occasions. In the first, the Brewers lost to the New York Yankees in the 1981 American League Division Series three games to two. The following year, Milwaukee won the 1982 American League Championship Series versus the California Angels three games to two. In that year’s World Series, the Brewers faced the National League Champion St. Louis Cardinals. The series went to a decisive game seven and resulted in a Brewers World Series loss. After a 26-season postseason drought that remains the third-longest in the expanded-postseason era, in their third appearance the Brewers won the 2008 National League Wild Card, earning them a berth in the 2008 National League Division Series. Milwaukee lost the series, three games to one, against the eventual World Series Champion Philadelphia Phillies. Most recently, the Brewers won the 2011 National League Central Division title and defeated the Arizona Diamondbacks three games to two in the 2011 National League Division Series. Despite winning game one in the 2011 National League Championship Series they would be eliminated by the eventual World Series Champion St. Louis Cardinals four games to two. In 2018, Milwaukee finished the regular season tied with the Chicago Cubs for first place in the NL Central. The Brewers defeated the Cubs in a one-game playoff, 3-1, securing the division title and relegating Chicago to the wild card game. The Brewers then swept the Colorado Rockies (who had just defeated the Cubs in the Wild Card game) in the best-of-five set, advancing to the NLCS.

The Brewers’ highest winning percentage (.593) was achieved in 2011 with a record of 96–66. Conversely, the team’s lowest winning percentage (.346) came in 2002 with a record of 56–106.

List of Silver Slugger Award winners at first base

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball (MLB). These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.Among first basemen, Paul Goldschmidt of the Arizona Diamondbacks, Todd Helton of the Colorado Rockies and Albert Pujols of the St. Louis Cardinals have won the most Silver Sluggers, with four each. Goldschmidt won the award in 2013, 2015, 2017 and 2018, Helton won four consecutive awards from 2000 to 2003, while Pujols won the award in 2004 and three consecutive times from 2008 to 2010. Pujols has also won the award at third base and outfield before converting to first base. In the American League, five players have won the award three times: Miguel Cabrera (Detroit Tigers; 2010, 2015, 2016) Cecil Cooper (Milwaukee Brewers; 1980–1982); Carlos Delgado (Toronto Blue Jays; 1999–2000, 2003), Don Mattingly (New York Yankees; 1985–1987); and Mark Teixeira (Texas Rangers, 2004–2005; New York Yankees, 2009). Jeff Bagwell, formerly of the National League's Houston Astros, has also won the award three times (1994, 1997, 1999). One player has won the award while playing for two different teams during his winning season. Fred McGriff was traded by the San Diego Padres to the Atlanta Braves during the 1993 season; he won the Silver Slugger Award with a .291 batting average and 37 home runs between the two teams. One father-son combination has won the award: Cecil Fielder won the American League Silver Slugger with the Detroit Tigers in 1990 and 1991, and his son Prince Fielder won the National League award with the Milwaukee Brewers in 2007 and 2011, and the American League award with the Tigers in 2012. José Abreu and Paul Goldschmidt are the most recent winners.

Helton holds the record for the highest batting average in a first baseman's Silver Slugger-winning season with the .372 mark he set in 2000. In the American League, Frank Thomas' .353 batting average in 1994 ranks first, and is the third-best in the history of the award. Mark McGwire holds the records in both leagues for highest slugging percentage, and the National League record for most home runs. McGwire slugged .730 for the Oakland Athletics in 1996, the year before he was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals. In 1998, McGwire hit 70 home runs on his way to the Major League home run record, slugging .752 while battling the entire season with Sammy Sosa. Chris Davis holds the American League record for most home runs in a Silver Slugger season when he hit 53 in 2013. Andrés Galarraga had 150 runs batted in (RBI) in 1996 when he won the award, followed closely by Ryan Howard's 2006 total of 149. The American League record for a Silver Slugger winner is 145 RBI, achieved by Mattingly (1985) and Delgado (2003).

Milwaukee Brewers

The Milwaukee Brewers are an American professional baseball team based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The Brewers compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. The team is named for the city's association with the brewing industry. Since 2001, the Brewers have played their home games at Miller Park, which has a seating capacity of 41,900.

The team was founded in 1969 as the Seattle Pilots, an expansion team of the American League (AL), in Seattle, Washington. The Pilots played their home games at Sick's Stadium. After only one season, the team relocated to Milwaukee, becoming known as the Brewers and playing their home games at Milwaukee County Stadium. In 1998, the Brewers joined the National League. They are the only franchise to play in four divisions since the advent of divisional play in Major League Baseball in 1969. They are also one of two current MLB franchises to switch leagues in their history, the other one being the Houston Astros.

The team's only World Series appearance came in 1982. After winning the ALCS against the California Angels, the Brewers faced off against the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series, losing 4–3. In 2011, the Brewers defeated the Arizona Diamondbacks to win the NLDS 3–2, but lost in the NLCS to the eventual World Series champion Cardinals 4–2.

Mort Cooper

Morton Cecil Cooper (March 2, 1913 – November 17, 1958) was an American baseball pitcher who played eleven seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played from 1938 to 1949 for the St. Louis Cardinals, Boston Braves, New York Giants, and Chicago Cubs. He batted and threw right-handed and was listed at 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) and 210 pounds (95 kg). He was the National League Most Valuable Player in 1942.

Silver Slugger Award

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League and the National League, as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball. These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.The prize is presented to outfielders irrespective of their specific position. This means that it is possible for three left fielders, or any other combination of outfielders, to win the award in the same year, rather than one left fielder, one center fielder, and one right fielder. In addition, only National League pitchers receive a Silver Slugger Award; lineups in the American League include a designated hitter in place of the pitcher in the batting order, so the designated hitter receives the award instead.Home run record-holder Barry Bonds won twelve Silver Slugger Awards in his career as an outfielder, the most of any player. He also won the award in five consecutive seasons twice in his career: from 1990 to 1994, and again from 2000 to 2004. Retired former New York Mets catcher Mike Piazza and former New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez are tied for second, with ten wins each. Rodriguez' awards are split between two positions; he won seven Silver Sluggers as a shortstop for the Seattle Mariners and Texas Rangers, and three with the Yankees as a third baseman. Wade Boggs leads third basemen with eight Silver Slugger Awards; Barry Larkin leads shortstops with nine. Other leaders include Ryne Sandberg (seven wins as a second baseman) and Mike Hampton (five wins as a pitcher). Todd Helton and Albert Pujols are tied for the most wins among first baseman with four, although Pujols has won two awards at other positions. David Ortiz has won seven awards at designated hitter position, the most at that position.

Winter Haven Super Sox

The Winter Haven Super Sox were one of the eight original franchises that began play in the Senior Professional Baseball Association in 1989. The club featured future Hall of Famer Ferguson Jenkins as part of its pitching staff.

In the league's inaugural season, the Super Sox struggled and went through several managerial changes. Player/manager Bill Lee was replaced after just seven games by Ed Nottle, who was in turn replaced by Leon Roberts. Besides, Doug Griffin served as a coach and Dalton Jones played and coached. Among others, Cecil Cooper retired after just 16 games with the club.The club finished in last place in the Northern Division and did not make the playoffs. Despite the team's poor performance, pitcher Bill Campbell led the league with a 2.12 ERA. After their first season, the Winter Haven Super Sox ceased operations.

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