Cecil Butler

Cecil Dean Butler (born October 23, 1937) is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. The right-hander worked in 11 games, including two starting assignments, for the Milwaukee Braves in 1962 and 1964. Nicknamed "Slewfoot," he was born in Dallas, Georgia, stood 6 feet 4 inches (1.93 m) tall and weighed 195 pounds (88 kg).

Butler's professional baseball career lasted for nine seasons (1957–65), all in the Braves' organization. He won a spot on the 1962 Milwaukee roster out of spring training and in his second MLB appearance, he worked 413 innings of three-hit relief on April 28 against the newly formed Houston Colt .45s at Colt Stadium. His scoreless effort netted him his first big-league win, as the Braves rallied from a 3–2 deficit to come back and prevail, 9–3.[1] Fifteen days later, he started against the National League's other expansion team, the New York Mets, at the Polo Grounds, and threw a six-hit, complete game victory, 3–2.[2]

But after another start on May 19, he suffered a severe elbow injury, and was very slow to recover. Butler made two appearances with the Braves over the final four months of 1962, spent 1963 in the minor leagues, and then got into two more games for Milwaukee in July 1964, but was ineffective. He retired after the 1965 season due to his injury.

In his 11 MLB games, Butler allowed 33 hits and nine bases on balls in 3513 innings pitched, with 24 strikeouts. He finished with a 2–0 record and a 3.31 earned run average.

Cecil Butler
Pitcher
Born: October 23, 1937 (age 81)
Dallas, Georgia
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 23, 1962, for the Milwaukee Braves
Last MLB appearance
July 25, 1964, for the Milwaukee Braves
MLB statistics
Win–loss record2–0
Earned run average3.31
Strikeouts24
Innings pitched3513
Teams

References

  1. ^ Retrosheet box score: 1962-04-28
  2. ^ Retrosheet box score: 1962-05-13

External links

1937 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1937 throughout the world.

1946 New Year Honours (MBE)

This is a list of MBEs awarded in the 1946 New Year Honours

The 1946 New Year Honours were appointments by many of the Commonwealth Realms of King George VI to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries, and to celebrate the passing of 1945 and the beginning of 1946. They were announced on 1 January 1946 for the United Kingdom, and Dominions, Canada, the Union of South Africa, and New Zealand.

1958 New Year Honours

The New Year Honours 1958 were appointments in many of the Commonwealth realms of Queen Elizabeth II to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries. They were announced in supplements to the London Gazette of 31 December 1957 to celebrate the year passed and mark the beginning of 1958.At this time honours for Australians were awarded both in the United Kingdom honours, on the advice of the premiers of Australian states, and also in a separate Australia honours list.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

1962 Milwaukee Braves season

The 1962 Milwaukee Braves season was the tenth for the franchise in Milwaukee and 92nd overall.

The fifth-place Braves finished the season with a 86–76 (.531) record, 15½ games behind the National League champion San Francisco Giants. The home attendance at County Stadium was 766,921, eighth in the ten-team National League. It was the Braves' first season under one million in Milwaukee.

After this season in November, owner Lou Perini sold the franchise for $5.5 million to a Chicago group led by 34-year-old insurance executive William Bartholomay. Perini retained a 10% interest in the club and sat on the board of directors for a number of years.

Ten years after the final television broadcasts in Boston, broadcasts of Braves games returned to a new channel, WTMJ-TV, giving Milwaukee television viewers a chance to watch the games at home.

1964 Milwaukee Braves season

The 1964 Milwaukee Braves season was the team's 12th season in Milwaukee while also the 94th season overall. The fifth-place Braves finished the season with a 88–74 (.543) record, five games behind the National League and World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals.

Milwaukee finished the season with ten wins in the final eleven games; the season's home attendance was 910,911, their highest since 1961, and the highest of the last four seasons in Milwaukee (1962–65).

It was the franchise's penultimate season in Milwaukee. The franchise had attempted to move to Atlanta shortly after this season; it was delayed a year, and the team relocated for the 1966 season.

2004 Pembrokeshire County Council election

Elections to Pembrokeshire County Council were held on 10 June 2004. It was preceded by the 1999 election and followed by the 2008 election. The results were drawn from the Pembrokeshire County Council website but the relevant page has now (2013) been deleted. On the same day there were elections to the other 21 local authorities in Wales (all except Anglesey), and to community council elections in Wales. There were also elections elsewhere in the United Kingdom

Atlanta Braves all-time roster

The Atlanta Braves are a National League ballclub (1966–present) previously located in Milwaukee 1953–1965 (Milwaukee Braves) and in Boston 1871–1952. The Boston teams are sometimes called Boston Red Stockings 1871–1876, Boston Red Caps 1876–1882, Boston Beaneaters 1883–1906, Boston Doves 1907–1910, Boston Rustlers 1911, Boston Braves 1912–1935, Boston Bees 1936–1940, Boston Braves 1941–1952. Here is a list of all their players in regular season games beginning 1871.

Bold identifies members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Italics identify players with uniform numbers retired by the team (Atlanta).

Cecil Butler (architect)

Cecil Butler (1897-1947) was an English architect who was closely associated with the development of Hampstead Garden Suburb.

Butler was architect to the Co-partnership Tenants for the suburb from 1923 to 1928, when he designed Neale Close, Midholm Close, and 34A-72 Hill Top. He also designed flats and shops in Lyttelton Court and Falloden Way. From 1939 to 1941 he was a partner at Shayles, Butler & Dilke in Shrewsbury. From 1942 to 1945 he worked at the Lands Department of the War Office.

Dallas, Georgia

Dallas is a city in, and the county seat of, Paulding County, Georgia, United States. The estimated population, as of 2010, was 12,629. Dallas is a northwestern suburb of Atlanta, located approximately 30 miles from downtown. It was named for George M. Dallas, Vice President of the United States of America, under James K. Polk.

In 2007, CNN and Money Magazine placed Paulding County in the Top 20 of its "Best Places to Live" in the United States.

Escape (play)

Escape is a British play in nine episodes written by John Galsworthy. The world premiere was on August 12, 1926 at the Ambassadors Theatre in London's West End, produced by Leon M. Lion. The play ran until March of the following year, when it went on tour of England with Gerald Ames in the lead role.Subsequently, the play transferred to Broadway where it was produced and staged by Winthrop Ames (no relation of Gerald Ames). The American production ran for 173 performances from 26 October 1927 to March 1928 at the Booth Theatre, New York City. It was included in Burns Mantle's The Best Plays of 1927–1928.

Hollywood Boulevard (1936 film)

Hollywood Boulevard (1936) is a comedy film directed by Robert Florey and released by Paramount Pictures.

John Eastwood (politician)

John Francis Eastwood OBE (13 October 1887 – 30 January 1952), was a Conservative Party politician in the United Kingdom.

Born in Guildford, Surrey, he was elected at the 1931 general election as Member of Parliament (MP) for Kettering in Northamptonshire, defeating the Labour MP Samuel Perry. He held the seat at the 1935 general election, but resigned in 1940 to become a Metropolitan Police magistrate. He died in Chelsea, London aged 64.

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