Caught stealing

In baseball, a runner is charged, and the fielders involved are credited, with a time caught stealing when the runner attempts to advance or lead off from one base to another without the ball being batted and then is tagged out by a fielder while making the attempt. A time caught stealing cannot be charged to a batter-runner, a runner who is still advancing as the direct result of reaching base. In baseball statistics, caught stealing is denoted by CS.[1] MLB began tracking caught stealing in 1951.

More specifically, a time caught stealing is charged when:

  • a runner, attempting a stolen base, is put out;
  • a runner is caught in a rundown play while stealing, and is tagged out; or
  • a runner, attempting a stolen base, is safe because a fielder is charged with an error on catching the ball, and in the judgment of the official scorer, the runner would have been out if the ball had been caught. (This official scoring is almost never made; an error is usually only charged if a bad throw or catch allows the runner to take an additional base, e.g., the runner attempts to steal second, the ball goes into the outfield, and the runner takes third as well. In such an instance the runner is credited with a steal of second, with the error accounting for the advance to third.)[2]

Rickey Henderson is the all-time leader in getting caught stealing (335 times). The current active leader is José Reyes of the New York Mets with 119 times caught.[3] These two players are also the all-time and active leaders, respectively, for successful steal attempts.

Pickoffs

A baserunner is "picked off" base when that runner takes a lead off his base and the pitcher (or catcher) makes a quick throw to a fielder manning that base, resulting in the runner being tagged out. In this circumstance, the baserunner is not considered to have been caught stealing. However, if, during the play, the runner made any feint or motion toward the next base, then the runner is caught stealing, even if he is eventually caught trying to re-assume the base which he originally occupied.

Wild Pitch/Passed Ball

If a runner is making no attempt to advance to the next base until there is a wild pitch or passed ball, and is then put out trying to advance to the next base, this runner is not caught stealing. The runner is put out on a fielder's choice, and a wild pitch/passed ball would not be charged to the pitcher or catcher.

Records

Rickey Henderson, the all-time stolen base leader with 1,406 steals, holds the major league and American League records for being caught stealing. Henderson was caught stealing 335 times in his career, including a record 293 times in the American League. Lou Brock, who ranks second on the all-time stolen base list and holds the National League record for career steals with 938, also holds the National League record for times caught stealing. Brock, who spent his entire career in the National League, was caught stealing 307 times.[4]

Henderson also holds the major league and American League records for being caught stealing in a single season, when he was thrown out 42 times in the 1982 season, when he set the post-1900 record for steals in a season with 130. (Hugh Nicol set the all-time record for steals with 138 in 1887 when he played for the Cincinnati Red Stockings of the American Association. Caught stealing records were not kept then.) Miller Huggins set the single season caught stealing record in the National League in 1914, when he was thrown out 36 times (he stole 32 bases that year).[4]

Robby Thompson of the San Francisco Giants was the first player in major league history to be caught stealing four times in one game. This occurred against the Cincinnati Reds on June 27, 1986.[5]

References

  1. ^ "Baseball Scorecard Abbreviations" (PDF). baseballscorecard.com. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  2. ^ "The Rules of Scoring; 10.00—The Official Scorer" (PDF). mlb.com. pp. 102–104. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  3. ^ "Career Leaders for Caught Stealing". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Caught Stealing Records". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  5. ^ "Thompson Sets Wrong Mark". Rome News-Tribune. Associated Press. June 29, 1986. p. 10B. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
1926 New York Yankees season

The 1926 New York Yankees season was the team's 24th season in New York, and its 26th season overall. The team finished with a record of 91–63, winning their fourth pennant, finishing three games ahead of the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they lost in 7 games to the St. Louis Cardinals, with the series ending with Babe Ruth being caught stealing second in the bottom of the 9th inning in game 7.

Adolfo Rivera

Adolfo Rivera (born May 22, 1982) is a baseball player who is most notable for being on Panama's roster for the 2006 World Baseball Classic. He is 6'4" tall and he weighs 215 pounds. He is right-handed.Although he appeared in three games in the 2006 World Baseball Classic, he had only one at-bat. He did not get a hit. In his other games, he was caught stealing once and scored one run.

At bat

In baseball, an at bat (AB) or time at bat is a batter's turn batting against a pitcher. An at bat is different from a plate appearance. A batter is credited with a plate appearance regardless of what happens during his turn at bat, but a batter is credited with an at bat only if that plate appearance does not have one of the results enumerated below. While at bats are used to calculate certain statistics, including batting average and slugging percentage, a player can qualify for the season-ending rankings in these categories only if he accumulates 502 plate appearances during the season.

A batter will not receive credit for an at bat if his plate appearance ends under the following circumstances:

He receives a base on balls (BB).

He is hit by a pitch (HBP).

He hits a sacrifice fly or a sacrifice bunt (also known as sacrifice hit).

He is awarded first base due to interference or obstruction, usually by the catcher.

He is replaced by another hitter before his at bat is completed, in which case the plate appearance and any related statistics go to the pinch hitter (unless he is replaced with two strikes and his replacement completes a strikeout, in which case the at bat and strikeout are still charged to the first batter).In addition, if the inning ends while he is still at bat (due to the third out being made by a runner caught stealing, for example), no at bat or plate appearance will result. In this case, the batter will come to bat again in the next inning, though the count will be reset to no balls and no strikes.

Rule 9.02(a)(1) of the official rules of Major League Baseball defines an at bat as: "Number of times batted, except that no time at bat shall be charged when a player: (A) hits a sacrifice bunt or sacrifice fly; (B) is awarded first base on four called balls; (C) is hit by a pitched ball; or (D) is awarded first base because of interference or obstruction[.]"

Been Caught Stealing

"Been Caught Stealing" is a song from Jane's Addiction's 1990 album, Ritual de lo Habitual. It was the band's biggest hit, spending four weeks at No. 1 on the U.S. modern rock chart. Different versions appear on the compilations Kettle Whistle, Up from the Catacombs – The Best of Jane's Addiction and Rev.

Among its highlights are what Rolling Stone dubbed "the best use of dog barks since Pet Sounds". "That was Annie," recalled singer Perry Farrell. "I'd got her from a dog shelter and she was quite needy, so I brought her down to the studio that day rather than leave her at home… I'm singing in the booth with the headphones on and Annie gets all excited and starts going, 'Ruff! Ruff! Ruff!'… The fact that she ended up on the track was just pure coincidence."

Bob Barton

Robert Wilbur Barton (July 30, 1941 – January 15, 2018) was an American professional baseball player who played catcher in the Major Leagues from 1965–74. He played for the San Francisco Giants, San Diego Padres and Cincinnati Reds.

Barton made his Major League debut on September 17, 1965 in a 9–1 Giants loss to the Milwaukee Braves at County Stadium, entering the game in the seventh inning, replacing catcher Jack Hiatt. He batted once, going 0–1 with a foulout. His first hit came in his next at-bat on September 28 in a 9–1 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals at San Francisco's Candlestick Park. Pinch-hitting for Baseball Hall of Famer Warren Spahn in the ninth inning, he singled off Larry Jaster.Barton was primarily a backup catcher, playing behind Tom Haller with the Giants and Baseball Hall of Famer Johnny Bench with the Reds. His best statistical year as a hitter was as a starter for the 1971 Padres; in 121 games, he hit .250 with five home runs and 23 runs batted in along with 17 doubles. On defense, in 1971 he led National League catchers in runners caught stealing (42), percentage of runners caught stealing (51.2%) and errors committed (15) and was second in assists (67).

Deacon McGuire

James Thomas "Deacon" McGuire (November 18, 1863 – October 31, 1936) was an American professional baseball player, manager and coach whose career spanned the years 1883 to 1915. He played 26 seasons in Major League Baseball, principally as a catcher, for 11 different major league clubs. His longest stretches were with the Washington Statesmen/Senators (901 games, 1892–99), Brooklyn Superbas (202 games, 1899–1901) and New York Highlanders (225 games, 1904–07). He played on Brooklyn teams that won National League pennants in 1899 and 1900.

McGuire was the most durable catcher of his era, setting major league catching records for most career games caught (1,612), putouts (6,856), assists (1,860), double plays turned (143), runners caught stealing (1,459), and stolen bases allowed (2,529). His assist, caught stealing, and stolen bases allowed totals remain current major league records. During his major league career, he also compiled a .278 batting average, .341 on-base percentage, 770 runs scored, 1,750 hits, 300 doubles, 79 triples, 45 home runs, 840 RBIs and 118 stolen bases. His best season was 1895 when he caught a major league record 133 games and compiled a .336 batting average with 10 home runs, 97 RBIs and 17 stolen bases.McGuire was also the manager of the Washington Senators (1898), Boston Red Sox (1907–08) and Cleveland Indians (1909–11). He compiled a 210–287 (.423) as a major league manager.

Gabby Hartnett

Charles Leo "Gabby" Hartnett (December 20, 1900 – December 20, 1972), nicknamed "Old Tomato Face", was an American professional baseball player and manager. He played almost his entire career in Major League Baseball as a catcher for the Chicago Cubs, from 1922 to 1940. He spent the final season of his career as a player-coach for the New York Giants in 1941. After his playing career, he continued his involvement in baseball as a coach and as a minor league manager.

Hartnett was an all-around player, performing well both offensively and defensively. Known for his strong and accurate throwing arm, he routinely led the National League's catchers in caught stealing percentage and was the first major league catcher to hit more than 20 home runs in a season. During the course of his career, he took part of some of the most memorable events in Major League Baseball history including; Babe Ruth's Called Shot during the 1932 World Series, Carl Hubbell's strike-out performance in the 1934 All-Star Game and Dizzy Dean's career-altering injury during the 1937 All-Star Game. But the greatest moment of Hartnett's career came with one week left in the 1938 season, when he hit a game-winning home run in the bottom of the ninth inning to put the Cubs in first place. The event, which occurred as darkness descended onto Wrigley Field, became immortalized as the Homer in the Gloamin'.Prior to Johnny Bench, Hartnett was considered the greatest catcher in the history of the National League. A six-time All-Star, he appeared in four World Series during his playing career. At the time of his retirement, Hartnett held the career records for catchers in home runs, runs batted in, hits, doubles and in most games played as a catcher. Hartnett was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955.

Hits per nine innings

In baseball statistics, hits per nine innings (denoted by H/9) is the average number of hits allowed by a pitcher in a nine inning period; calculated as: (hits allowed x 9) / innings pitched. This is a measure of a pitcher's success based on the number of all outs he records.

Compared to a pitcher's batting average against, a pitcher's H/9 benefits from sacrifice bunts, double plays, runners caught stealing, and outfield assists, but it is hurt by some errors. Unlike batting average against, a pitcher's H/9 benefits from outs that are not related to official at bats, as they are recorded on runners after they have reached base.

Johnnie LeMaster

Johnnie Lee LeMaster (born June 19, 1954) is a former Major League Baseball infielder. He played for 12 seasons (1975–1985 and 1987) for four teams, including 10 seasons for the San Francisco Giants. He batted and threw right-handed.

On September 2, 1975 LeMaster became the second player in major league history to hit an inside-the-park home run in his first at bat, during a 7–3 win over the Dodgers. LeMaster hit only 21 home runs during the rest of his career (3,191 at bats).

LeMaster is remember for a game in July 1979, when he took the field wearing the phrase on his back that Giants fans often welcomed him with; in place of his last name was the word "BOO".In 1983, LeMaster amassed over 100 hits for the only time in his career, batting .240 and finishing seventh in the National League with 39 stolen bases while finishing third in the National League with 19 times caught stealing.

During the 1985 season, he played for three teams: the San Francisco Giants, the Cleveland Indians, and the Pittsburgh Pirates; all three teams ended up in last place in their respective divisions.LeMaster was a career .222 hitter with 22 home runs and 229 runs batted in in 1039 games.

List of Major League Baseball career records

In Major League Baseball (MLB), records play an integral part in evaluating a player's impact on the sport. Holding a career record almost guarantees a player eventual entry into the Baseball Hall of Fame because it represents both longevity and consistency over a long period of time.

Paul Richards (baseball)

Paul Rapier Richards (November 21, 1908 – May 4, 1986) was an American professional baseball player, manager, scout and executive in Major League Baseball. During his playing career, he was a catcher and right-handed batter with the Brooklyn Dodgers (1932), New York Giants (1933–35), Philadelphia Athletics (1935) and Detroit Tigers (1943–46). After retiring, he became the manager of the Chicago White Sox (1951–54, 1976) and Baltimore Orioles (1955–61). He also served as the General Manager for the Orioles, the Houston Colt .45s and the Atlanta Braves.

Scott Podsednik

Scott Eric Podsednik (; born March 18, 1976) is an American former professional baseball outfielder in Major League Baseball (MLB). Best known for his baserunning, Podsednik led the major leagues in stolen bases in 2004 with 70, in times caught stealing in 2005 with 23, and the American League in times caught stealing in 2006 with 19. He won the World Series with the 2005 Chicago White Sox, hitting a walk-off home run in Game 2.

Second Garrotte

Second Garrotte is a ghost town located near Groveland in Tuolumne County, California originally settled during the California Gold Rush. It lies at an elevation of 2,894 feet / 882 meters in Second Garrotte Basin. The town was named after a nearby hanging tree, where according to local lore as many as thirty men were said to have been hanged. Certain contemporary accounts from miners and settlers in the area suggest only two men were hung at Second Garrotte, a pair of thieves caught stealing gold dust from a sluice box. Jason Chamerblain and James Chaffee, early settlers at Second Garrotte who owned the property on which the hanging tree stood, denied any hangings took place.The nearby town of Groveland was originally known as First Garrotte, named after an earlier hanging at that town.

Secondary average

Secondary average, or SecA, is a baseball statistic that measures the sum of extra bases gained on hits, walks, and stolen bases (less times caught stealing) depicted per at bat. Created by Bill James, it is a sabermetric measurement of hitting performance that seeks to evaluate the number of bases a player gained independent of batting average. Unlike batting average, which is a simple ratio of base hits to at bats, secondary average accounts for power (extra base hits), plate discipline (walks), and speed (stolen bases minus times caught stealing). Secondary averages have a higher variance than batting averages.

Stolen base

In baseball, a stolen base occurs when a runner advances to a base to which he is not entitled and the official scorer rules that the advance should be credited to the action of the runner. The umpires determine whether the runner is safe or out at the next base, but the official scorer rules on the question of credit or blame for the advance under Rule 10.A stolen base most often occurs when a base runner advances to the next base while the pitcher is pitching the ball to home plate.

Successful base stealers are not only fast but have good baserunning instincts and timing.

Stolen base percentage

Stolen base percentage is a statistic used in baseball.

A player's stolen base percentage (a.k.a. SB%) measures his rate of success in stealing bases. Because stolen bases tend to help a team less than times caught stealing hurt, a player needs to have a high stolen base percentage in order to contribute much value to his team. A commonly used figure is that a player needs to succeed about 2/3 of the time to break even.

With 300 minimum career attempts, Carlos Beltrán currently holds the record for highest Stolen base percentage in the Major Leagues, with .881, with Tim Raines in second, with .847.

Total Baseball developed a statistic related to stolen base percentage called "Stolen Base Runs" or SBR.

(.3 x Stolen Bases) - (.6 x Caught Stealing)

This Total Baseball statistic is aimed at quantifying base-stealing. Numerous statistical studies done by Total Baseball have shown that the break even success rate for steals (the rate at which an attempt to steal is neither helping nor hurting the team in terms of total runs scored) is about 67%. Each successful steal adds approximately .3 runs to a team's total runs scored which is much less than often believed. Therefore, the statistic is meant to estimate the impact of base-stealers, which, other than the elite base-stealers, rarely amounts to more than a few runs per year for each team.

Wes Westrum

Wesley Noreen Westrum (November 28, 1922 – May 28, 2002) was an American professional baseball player, coach, manager, and scout. He played for 11 seasons as a catcher in Major League Baseball for the New York Giants from 1947 to 1957 and was known as a superb defensive catcher. He served as the second manager in the history of the New York Mets, replacing Casey Stengel in 1965 after the latter fractured his hip and was forced to retire.

Yadier Molina

Yadier Benjamin Molina (Spanish pronunciation: [ʝaˈdjeɾ moˈlina]; born July 13, 1982), nicknamed "Yadi", is a Puerto Rican professional baseball catcher for the St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball (MLB). He has played his entire 16-year major league career with the Cardinals since his debut on June 3, 2004, and also for the Puerto Rican national team in four World Baseball Classic (WBC) tournaments. Widely considered one of the greatest defensive catchers of all time, Molina is the recipient of a number of accolades, including nine Rawlings Gold Gloves and six Fielding Bible Awards. A two-time World Series champion, he is a paramount figure in nine Cardinals playoff appearances and four National League (NL) pennants, and a two-time silver medalist with Puerto Rico. Molina bats and throws right-handed, stands 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall, and weighs 205 pounds (93 kg).

Molina ranks second all-time among catchers with 130 Defensive Runs Saved (DRS), and first among active catchers with 845 assists, 41.69% of runners caught stealing, and 55 pickoffs. He also ranks in the top 70 among catchers in history in each of fielding percentage, games played, double plays turned and assists. As a hitter, he has accrued more than 1,900 hits, 150 home runs, and 800 runs batted in (RBI) during his career, while batting over .300 five times. Other distinctions include selection to nine MLB All-Star Games, to the 2018 MLB Japan All-Star Series, four fan-based Platinum Glove Awards, and one Silver Slugger Award. He is also a two-time selection to the All-WBC Tournament Team.

The product of a baseball family, Molina was born in Bayamon, Puerto Rico. His father was an amateur second baseman and the all-time hits leader in Puerto Rican baseball, and his two older brothers, Bengie and José, also developed into standout defensive catchers with lengthy MLB careers. Long before playing professionally, Molina's pitch-handling and throwing skills caught the attention of scouts. The Cardinals' fourth round selection in the 2000 MLB draft, he quickly showed one of the strongest and most accurate arms in the game after starting play in the major leagues. Having earned a reputation as a team leader throughout his career, Molina formulates fielder positioning plans and complete pitching strategies to opposing hitters.

Initially considered a light hitter, Molina significantly improved his offense and raised his career batting average from .248 in 2007. He has appeared on five NL Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) ballots, including finishing fourth in 2012 and third in 2013. The only catcher in Cardinals history to appear in at least five postseasons, in 2006 he became just the third catcher to play in two World Series before age 25, following Johnny Bench and Yogi Berra. The major leagues' all-time leader in games caught with one team, Molina is under contract through 2020. He is considered to be a strong future candidate for the Hall of Fame. When Hurricane Maria ravaged the island of Puerto Rico in September 2017, Molina began relief efforts for victims of the catastrophe, consequently receiving the Roberto Clemente Award in 2018.

Batting
Base running
Pitching
Fielding
Sabermetrics

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.