Catholic higher education

Catholic higher education includes universities, colleges, and other institutions of higher education privately run by the Catholic Church, typically by religious institutes. Those tied to the Holy See are specifically called pontifical universities.

By definition, Catholic canon law states that "A Catholic school is understood to be one which is under control of the competent ecclesiastical authority or of a public ecclesiastical juridical person, or one which in a written document is acknowledged as Catholic by the ecclesiastical authority" (Can. 803). Although some schools are deemed "Catholic" because of their identity and a great number of students enrolled are Catholics, it is also stipulated in canon law that "no school, even if it is in fact Catholic, may bear the title 'Catholic school' except by the consent of the competent ecclesiastical authority" (Can. 803 §3).

The Dominican Order was "the first order instituted by the Church with an academic mission",[1] founding studia conventualia in every convent of the order, and studia generalia at the early European universities such as the University of Bologna and the University of Paris. In Europe, most universities with medieval history were founded as Catholic. Many of them were rescinded to government authourities in the Modern era. Some, however, remained Catholic, while new ones were established alongside the public ones. The Catholic Church is still the largest non-governmental provider of higher education in the world. Many of them are still internationally competitive. According to the census of the Vatican's Congregation for Catholic Education, the total number of Catholic universities and higher education institutions around the world is 1,358. On the other hand, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops counts it at 1,861. The Catholic religious order with the highest number of universities around the world today is the Society of Jesus with 114.[2]

Like other private schools, Catholic universities and colleges are generally nondenominational, in that they accept anyone regardless of religious affiliation, nationality, ethnicity, or civil status, provided the admission or enrollment requirements and legal documents are submitted, and rules and regulations are obeyed for a fruitful life on campus. However, non-Catholics, whether Christian or not, may or may not participate in otherwise required campus activities, particularly those of a religious nature.

Chapel of the faculty of medicine of Saint Joseph University, Beirut
Chapel of the faculty of medicine of Saint Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon

Partial list of universities

Albania

Angola

Argentina

Australia

Austria

Bangladesh

Belgium

Benin

Bolivia

Brazil

Burkina Faso

Cameroon

Canada

Public universities that continue to claim Catholic affiliation

Catholic institutions affiliated or federated to public universities

Private Catholic universities

Chile

China

Colombia

Congo, Democratic Republic of

Costa Rica

  • Universidad Católica de Costa Rica, San José; f.1993
  • Universidad de La Salle, San José; f.1994
  • Universidad Juan Pablo II, San José

Croatia

Cuba

Czech Republic

Dominican Republic

East Timor

Ecuador

El Salvador

Ethiopia

  • Ethiopian Catholic University of St. Thomas Aquinas (ECUSTA), Addis Ababa

France

Germany

Ghana

Guatemala

Haiti

Honduras

Hungary

India

Indonesia

Iraq

Ireland

Israel

Italy

See also Vatican

Ivory Coast (Côte d'Ivoire)

Japan

Jordan

Kenya

Korea

Lebanon

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Madagascar

Malawi

Malta

Mexico

Mozambique

Nepal

Netherlands

New Zealand

  • The Catholic Institute of Aotearoa New Zealand, Wellington

Nicaragua

Nigeria

Pakistan

Palestine

Panama

Papua New Guinea

Paraguay

Peru

Philippines

There are more than 40 universities — besides many colleges — in the Philippine Catholic Church. Among these universities are:

Poland

In Poland also work faculties of theology in some public universities.

Portugal

Puerto Rico

Romania

Rwanda

  • Catholic University of Kabgayi, Gitarama
  • Catholic University of Rwanda, Butare

Sierra Leone

Singapore

Slovakia

Slovenia

  • Catholic Institute Faculty of Business Studies(FBS), Ljubljana
  • University of Ljubljana Faculty of Theology, Ljubljana

South Africa

South Sudan

Spain

Sri Lanka

  • Aquinas University College, Colombo

Sudan

Sweden

Switzerland

Taiwan

Tanzania

Thailand

Togo

Uganda

Ukraine

United Arab Emirates

United Kingdom

United States

There are 244 Catholic higher education degree-granting institutions in the United States.[3] Among the most well known are:

Uruguay

Vatican

Venezuela

Vietnam

Zambia

Zimbabwe

Academic rankings

Some of the universities, including Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, are ranked in the top list of universities according to the Times Higher Education journal.[4] There is so far no list of academic rankings of Catholic universities. In the United States, U.S. News & World Report magazine provides the Best Colleges ranking; University of Notre Dame, Georgetown University, and Boston College have been scored as top Catholic national universities.

See also

References

  1. ^ Pirerre Mandonnet, "Order of Preachers" Catholic Encyclopedia, 1913; http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Catholic_Encyclopedia_%281913%29/Order_of_Preachers Accessed 12-31-12
  2. ^ Sophia University
  3. ^ "Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities". Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved 2010-10-31.
  4. ^ "The University Rankings 2010", The World University Rankings
Anne Hendershott

Anne Hendershott (née Barnhardt; born July 12, 1949, Waterbury, Connecticut) is an American sociologist and author. She is the author of several books, including The Politics of Deviance, The Politics of Abortion, and most recently Status Envy: The Politics of Catholic Higher Education. She has taught at the University of San Diego and at The King's College in New York City. She is currently a professor of Psychology, Sociology, and Social Work at Franciscan University (Steubenville, Ohio).

Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities

The Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities (ACCU) is a voluntary association of delegates from Catholic institutions of higher learning.

Auguste Lemonnier

The Rev. Auguste Lemonnier, C.S.C. (April 12, 1839 – October 29, 1874) was a French-American Catholic priest, and fourth President of the University of Notre Dame from 1872 to 1874.

The nephew of Rev. Edward Sorin, he traveled from France to Notre Dame in February 1861, where he completed his seminary studies and was ordained a priest on November 4, 1863. At Notre Dame, he was Prefect of Discipline (1863-1865), Prefect of Religion (1865-1866), and the President (1872-1874).

Bill Donohue

William Anthony "Bill" Donohue (born July 18, 1947) is an American Roman Catholic. He has been president of the Catholic League in the United States since 1993.

Cardinal Newman Society

The Cardinal Newman Society is an American 501(c)(3) tax-exempt, nonprofit organization founded in 1993 that is dedicated to promoting and defending faithful Catholic education. The organization is guided by Cardinal John Henry Newman's The Idea of a University and Pope John Paul II's 1990 Apostolic Constitution Ex Corde Ecclesiae. The organization claims a membership of more than 20,000.It should not be confused with the Oxford University Newman Society, the Society for the Study of Cardinal Newman, or Newman Centers, the name often used to designate Catholic campus ministry centers at state and other non-Catholic universities.

Catholic Christian Outreach

Catholic Christian Outreach Canada (CCO) is a Catholic missionary organization that is present at several Canadian universities. It seeks to bring students into a personal relationship with Jesus Christ, equip them to live in the fullness of the Catholic faith, and build them up as leaders in evangelization.

Catholic campus ministry

Catholic campus ministry is the presence and ministry or service of the Catholic Church on the campus of a school, college, or university. It may include the setting up of clubs, groups, and organizations, as well as the animating of liturgies, retreats, recollections, and the handling of religion classes, workshops, and seminars. Some examples of Catholic campus ministries include Newman Club, Newman Apostolate, and the Catholic Student Association.

Catholic charities

Catholic charities refer to a number of Catholic charitable organisations.

Catholic spiritual teaching includes spreading the Gospel while Catholic social teaching emphasises support for the sick, the poor and the afflicted through the corporal and spiritual works of mercy. The Catholic Church is the largest non-governmental provider of education and medical services in the world.Some charitable organisations are listed below.

Chiro

Chiro Flanders (Dutch: Chirojeugd Vlaanderen) is a Flemish youth organisation, founded on Christian values. With more than 100,000 members Chiro is the biggest youth organization in Belgium. While mainly focusing on having fun, it also aims at developing youngsters' responsibility and skills. Chiro is a member of the umbrella of Catholic youth organizations Fimcap.

Christian Life Community

The Christian Life Community (CLC) is an international association of lay Christians who have adopted an Ignatian model of spiritual life. The 'Community' is present in almost sixty countries.

Confraternity of Christian Doctrine

Confraternity of Christian Doctrine (CCD) is an association established in Rome in 1562 for the purpose of giving religious education. Its modern usage is a religious education program of the Roman Catholic Church, normally designed for children. In some parishes, CCD is called PSR, meaning Parish School of Religion.

Fellowship of Catholic University Students

The Fellowship of Catholic University Students (FOCUS) is a Catholic outreach program for American college students founded in 1997 by Curtis Martin and Dr. Edward Sri at Benedictine College.

International Federation of Catholic Universities

The International Federation of Catholic Universities' (IFCU) is an organisation of over 200 Catholic universities throughout the world.

Lists of Catholics

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with approximately 1.3 billion baptised Catholics worldwide, as of 2016.

Patrick Colovin

The Rev. Patrick J. Colovin, C.S.C. (July 4, 1842 – August 22, 1887) was an Irish-Canadian Catholic priest, and fifth President of the University of Notre Dame from 1874 to 1877. He was educated at the College de Saint-Laurent, where he was also professor and superior. He was ordained in March of 186. He was later assigned from 1872-1874 to Sacred Heart College in Watertown, Wisconsin. In 1871, he was sent to Notre Dame as professor of Dogma. Here he became president in 1877. He was later named pastor of St. Bernard’s, Watertown and remained there until February 1, 1880. He was later sent to Lead in the Black Hills, South Dakota.

St. Paul's College (Manitoba)

St. Paul's College is a Roman Catholic College on the Fort Garry campus of the University of Manitoba and is the major Catholic higher education institution in the Province of Manitoba.

St. Paul University System

The St. Paul University System is a Catholic higher education system in the Philippines run by the Sisters of St. Paul of Chartres (SPC). See article on Paulists.

Thomas E. Walsh

The Rev. Thomas E. Walsh, C.S.C. was an Irish-Canadian Catholic priest, and seventh President of the University of Notre Dame from 1881 to 1893.

He was born one of nine in Lacolle, Quebec, son of Thomas Walsh and Winifred McDermott. He was educated at the College de Saint-Laurent, where he caught the attention of Rev. Edward Sorin, who saw his potential. He finished his studies there in 1872 and entered the Novitiate. Sorin sent him to study at College de Ste. Croix in Neuilly, close to Paris, where he spent three years.

He was recalled to Notre Dame in 1876 in order to improve enrollment. He was ordained a priest on August 29th, 1877 by Bishop Joseph Dwenger of Fort Wayne and then assumed the role of Dean of Students. After the great fire of 1879, Walsh was in charge of rescheduling classes and professors in the newly reopened college, and his administrative ability led Sorin and William Corby to pick him as next president in 1881. He died of kidney disease at the age of 40.

William P. Leahy

William P. Leahy (born 1948) is the 25th President of Boston College, a post he has held since 1996. He was born in Omaha, Nebraska and raised in Imogene, Iowa. He joined the Society of Jesus in 1967, and is a member of the Jesuits' Wisconsin province. Leahy earned a bachelor's degree in philosophy and a master's degree in United States history at Saint Louis University in 1972 and 1975, respectively. He then began studies at the Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley in Berkeley, California, where he earned degrees in theology (1978) and historical theology (1980). He was ordained a priest in 1978. He received a doctoral degree in U.S. history from Stanford University in 1986.

He began his academic career as a teacher at Campion High School in Wisconsin from 1973 to 1975. He served as a teaching assistant at Stanford in 1981 before joining the Marquette University faculty as an instructor of history in 1985. He became an associate professor with tenure in 1991, and in that same year became Marquette's executive vice president.Leahy's memberships include the American Catholic Historical Association, the American Historical Association, the History of Education Society, and the Organization of American Historians.

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