Catchphrase

A catchphrase (alternatively spelled catch phrase) is a phrase or expression recognized by its repeated utterance. Such phrases often originate in popular culture and in the arts, and typically spread through word of mouth and a variety of mass media (such as films, internet, literature and publishing, television and radio). Some become the de facto or literal "trademark" or "signature" of the person or character with whom they originated, and can be instrumental in the typecasting of a particular actor.

Culture

According to Richard Harris, a psychology professor at Kansas State University who studied why people like to cite films in social situations, using film quotes in everyday conversation is similar to telling a joke and a way to form solidarity with others. "People are doing it to feel good about themselves, to make others laugh, to make themselves laugh", he said. He found that all of the participants in his study had used film quotes in conversation at one point or another. "They overwhelmingly cited comedies, followed distantly by dramas and action adventure flicks." Horror films, musicals and children's films were hardly ever cited.[1]

See also

Lists

Related topics

References

  1. ^ Pawlowski, A (March 9, 2009). "You talkin' to me? Film quotes stir passion". CNN. Retrieved January 21, 2010.

Further reading

External links

"Holy..."

"Holy…!" (for example "Holy cow!", "Holy mackerel!" or "Holy smoke!") is an exclamation of surprise used mostly in English-speaking countries.

Robin of the Batman TV series is noted for his many catchphrase "Holy…" exclamations. The lines in the 1960s TV series were uttered by Burt Ward who played Robin, who delivered the exclamations in a nasal voice. Many of the camp quips are directly related to the plot; for example, "Holy Graf Zeppelin!" is uttered by Robin upon seeing an aerial balloon.

Alphonse and Gaston

Alphonse and Gaston was an American comic strip by Frederick Burr Opper, featuring a bumbling pair of Frenchmen with a penchant for politeness. They first appeared in William Randolph Hearst's newspaper, the New York Journal on September 22, 1901, in a strip titled: Alphonse a la Carte and His Friend Gaston de Table d'Hote. The strip was later distributed by King Features Syndicate.

Bugs Bunny

Bugs Bunny is an animated cartoon character, created in the late 1930s by Leon Schlesinger Productions (later Warner Bros. Cartoons) and voiced originally by Mel Blanc. Bugs is best known for his starring roles in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated short films, produced by Warner Bros. Though a similar character debuted in the WB cartoon Porky's Hare Hunt (1938) and appeared in a few subsequent shorts, the definitive character of Bugs is widely credited to have made his debut in director Tex Avery's Oscar-nominated film A Wild Hare (1940).Bugs is an anthropomorphic gray and white rabbit who is famous for his flippant, insouciant personality. He is also characterized by a Brooklyn accent, his portrayal as a trickster, and his catch phrase "Eh... What's up, doc?" Due to Bugs' popularity during the golden age of American animation, he became an American cultural icon and the official mascot of Warner Bros. Entertainment. He can thus be seen in the older Warner Bros. company logos.Since his debut, Bugs has appeared in various short films, feature films, compilations, TV series, music records, comics, video games, award shows, amusement park rides, and commercials. He has also appeared in more films than any other cartoon character, is the ninth most-portrayed film personality in the world, and has his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Catch Phrase (game)

Catch Phrase is a word guessing party game commercially available from Hasbro.

Catchphrase (UK game show)

Catchphrase is a British game show based on the short-lived U.S. game show of the same name. It originally aired on ITV in the United Kingdom between 12 January 1986 and 23 April 2004. A currently running revival premiered on ITV on 7 April 2013.Catchphrase was presented by Northern Irish comedian Roy Walker from its 1986 premiere until 1999, airing weekly at night. Nick Weir took the programme over in 2000 and hosted it until the end of series 16 on 23 April 2004. Mark Curry replaced Weir for the final series, which moved to a daytime slot and ran from 24 June to 19 December 2002. When the series was revived in 2013, Stephen Mulhern was named presenter and it returned to its weekly nighttime period.

In the original series, two contestants, one male and one female, would have to identify the familiar phrase represented by a piece of animation accompanied by background music. The show's mascot, a golden robot called "Mr. Chips", appears in many of the animations. In the revived version of the show, the same format remains, but there are three contestants and there is no particular attention paid to gender.

Catchphrase was a creation of Steve Radosh, who created the American series that the British programme was derived from; due to this, he is given credit for creating this show as well (as was producer Marty Pasetta and distributor Telepictures).

D'oh!

"D'oh!" () is a catchphrase used by the fictional character Homer Simpson, from the longest running American scripted primetime television series, The Simpsons, an animated sitcom (1989–present). It is typically used when Homer injures himself, realizes that he has done something stupid, or when something bad has happened or is about to happen to him. All his prominent blood relations—son Bart, daughters Lisa and Maggie, his father, his mother and half-brother—have also been heard to use it themselves in similar circumstances. On a few occasions Homer's wife Marge and even non-related characters such as Mr. Burns and Sideshow Bob have also used this phrase.

In 2006, "d'oh!" was listed as number six on TV Land's list of the 100 greatest television catchphrases. The spoken word "d'oh" is a sound trademark of 20th Century Fox. Since 2001, the word "doh" has appeared in the Oxford English Dictionary, without the apostrophe. Early recorded usages of the sound "d'oh" are in numerous episodes of the BBC Radio series It's That Man Again between 1945 and 1949, but the OxfordWords blog notes "Homer was responsible for popularizing it as an exclamation of frustration." The term also appeared in an early issue of Mad comics, with a different spelling but the same meaning, in issue 8 (December 1953 – January 1954); in a one-page story by Harvey Kurtzman entitled "Hey Look!", a man seeking peace and quiet suddenly hears a loud radio and, grimacing, says, "D-oooh – the neighbors [sic] radio!!"

Danielle Bregoli

Danielle Bregoli (born March 26, 2003), also known by her stage name Bhad Bhabie (pronounced "bad baby"), is an American rapper and Internet personality. She first became known from an episode of Dr. Phil in September 2016, in which she said the phrase "cash me outside, how 'bout dat", which then became a viral video meme and catchphrase. In 2017, Bregoli became the youngest female rapper ever to appear on the Billboard Hot 100 chart with her debut single "These Heaux". She subsequently signed a record deal with Atlantic Records and has now expanded into a reality show, a makeup brand, tours and a music career.

Elvis has left the building

"Elvis has left the building" is a phrase that was often used by public address announcers at the conclusion of Elvis Presley concerts in order to disperse audiences who lingered in hopes of an encore. It has since become a catchphrase and punchline.

Glenn Quagmire

Glenn Quagmire, often referred to by just his surname, is a character from the American animated television series Family Guy. He is a neighbor and friend of the Griffin family and is best known for his hypersexuality and his catchphrase, "Giggity". The show's creator and voice actor Seth MacFarlane describes him as "an appalling human being who is still caught in the rat-pack era" based on anachronistic 1950s party-animal clichés.

Glossary of Mafia-related words

This is a glossary of words related to the Mafia, primarily the Italian American Mafia and Sicilian Mafia.

administration: the top-level "management" of an organized crime Family -- the boss, underboss and consigliere.associate: one who works with mobsters, but hasn't been asked to take the vow of Omertà; an almost confirmed, or made guy.connected guy: an associate

barone: a baron or landlord.books, the: a phrase indicating membership in the Family. If there is a possibility for promotion, then the books are open. If not, the books are closed.

boss: the head of the Family who runs the show. He decides who gets made and who gets whacked. The boss also gets points from all Family business; also see don, chairman.

capo: the Family member who leads a crew; short for caporegime or capodecina.

captain: a capo.

clip: to murder; also to whack, hit, pop, burn, ice, put a contract out on.

code of silence: not ratting on one's colleagues once one has been pinched -- no longer a strong virtue in organized crime families. Also, see omertà.

comáre, literally "godmother", usually pronounced "goomah" or "goomar" in American English: a Mafia mistress.

confirm: to be made; see made guy.

consigliere: the Family adviser, who is always consulted before decisions are made.

Cosa Nostra (Our thing): mob term for the family or Mafia

crank: speed; in particular, crystal meth.

crew: the group of soldiers under the capo's command.

cugine: a young soldier striving to be made.

don: the head of the Family; see boss.

earner: a member who brings in a lot of money for the family

eat alone: to keep for oneself; to be greedy.

family: an organized crime clan, like the Genoveses, the Gambinos, or the Sopranos.

forget about it (often pronounced "fuggedaboutit"): An exclamation; as the title character explains in Donnie Brasco:"Forget about it" is, like, if you agree with someone, you know, like "Raquel Welch is one great piece of ass. Forget about it!" But then, if you disagree, like "A Lincoln is better than a Cadillac? Forget about it!" You know? But then, it's also like if something's the greatest thing in the world, like, "Minchia! Those peppers! Forget about it!" But it's also like saying "Go to hell!" too. Like, you know, like "Hey Paulie, you got a one inch pecker?" and Paulie says "Forget about it!" Sometimes it just means "Forget about it."

G: a grand; a thousand dollars; also see large.

garbage business: euphemism for organized crime.

Golden Age: The days before RICO.

goombah: an associate, especially a senior member of a criminal gang.

heavy: packed, carrying a weapon.

hit: to murder; also see whack.

juice: the interest paid to a loan shark for the loan; also see vig.

kick up: give a part of the income to the next up in the command chain.

lam: To lay down, go into hiding

large: a thousand, a grand, a G.

made man: an inducted member of the Family.

make one's bones: gain credibility by killing someone.

mock execution: to whip someone into shape by frightening them.

mattresses, going to, taking it to, or hitting the: going to war with a rival clan or family.

message job: placing the bullet in someone's body such that a specific message is sent to that person's crew or family; see through the eye and through the mouth.

mob, the: a single organized crime family; OR all organized crime families together.

mobbed up: connected to the mob.

mobster: one who is in the mob.

Omertà: to take a vow of silence in the Mafia, punishable by death if not upheld.

outfit: a clan, or family within the Mafia.

pass: A reprieve from being whacked.

paying tribute: giving the boss a cut of the deal.

pinched: to get caught by the cops or federal agents.

points: percent of income; cut.

program, the: The Witness Protection Program.

rat: one who snitches or squeals after having been pinched.

RICO: Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act. Passed in 1970 to aid the American government in clamping down on organized crime activities, its scope has since been broadened to prosecute insider traders and anti-abortion protesters.

shakedown: to blackmail or try to get money from someone; also to give someone a scare.

shy: the interest charged on loans by loan sharks.

shylockbusiness: the business of loansharking.

soldier: the bottom-level member of an organized crime Family, as in "foot soldiers."

spring cleaning: cleaning up, hiding or getting rid of evidence.

tax: to take a percentage of someone's earnings.

This Thing of Ours (Cosa Nostra): a mob family, or the entire mob.

through the eye: a message job through the eye to say "We're watching you!"

through the mouth: a message job through the mouth to indicate that someone WAS a rat.

underboss: the second in command to the boss.

vig: Vigorish abbr. the house's or bookie's take in gambling or the interest paid to a loan shark for the loan; also see juice.

waste management business: euphemism for organized crime.

whack: to murder; also clip, hit, pop, burn, put a contract out.

wiseguy: a made man.

Jerry Maguire

Jerry Maguire is a 1996 American romantic comedy-drama sports film written, produced and directed by Cameron Crowe, and stars Tom Cruise, Cuba Gooding Jr. and Renée Zellweger. Produced in part by long time Simpsons producer James L. Brooks, it was inspired by sports agent Leigh Steinberg, who acted as Technical Consultant on the crew. It was released in North American theaters on December 13, 1996, produced by Gracie Films and distributed by TriStar Pictures.

The film received critical acclaim, with critics praising its acting and writing. The film was a financial success, bringing in more than $273 million worldwide, against its $50 million budget. It was the ninth top-grossing film of 1996.

The film was nominated for five Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Actor for Tom Cruise, with Cuba Gooding Jr. winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. The film was also nominated for three Golden Globes, with Tom Cruise winning for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy, and three Screen Actors Guild Awards, with Cuba Gooding Jr. winning Best Supporting Actor.

KFC

KFC, also known as Kentucky Fried Chicken, is an American fast food restaurant chain that specializes in fried chicken. Headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky, it is the world's second-largest restaurant chain (as measured by sales) after McDonald's, with almost 20,000 locations globally in 123 countries and territories as of December 2015. The chain is a subsidiary of Yum! Brands, a restaurant company that also owns the Pizza Hut, Taco Bell, and WingStreet chains.

KFC was founded by Colonel Harland Sanders, an entrepreneur who began selling fried chicken from his roadside restaurant in Corbin, Kentucky, during the Great Depression. Sanders identified the potential of the restaurant franchising concept, and the first "Kentucky Fried Chicken" franchise opened in Utah in 1952. KFC popularized chicken in the fast food industry, diversifying the market by challenging the established dominance of the hamburger. By branding himself as "Colonel Sanders", Harland became a prominent figure of American cultural history, and his image remains widely used in KFC advertising to this day. However, the company's rapid expansion overwhelmed the aging Sanders, and he sold it to a group of investors led by John Y. Brown Jr. and Jack C. Massey in 1964.

KFC was one of the first American fast food chains to expand internationally, opening outlets in Canada, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Jamaica by the mid-1960s. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, it experienced mixed fortunes domestically, as it went through a series of changes in corporate ownership with little or no experience in the restaurant business. In the early 1970s, KFC was sold to the spirits distributor Heublein, which was taken over by the R.J. Reynolds food and tobacco conglomerate; that company sold the chain to PepsiCo. The chain continued to expand overseas, however, and in 1987, it became the first Western restaurant chain to open in China. It has since expanded rapidly in China, which is now the company's single largest market. PepsiCo spun off its restaurants division as Tricon Global Restaurants, which later changed its name to Yum! Brands.

KFC's original product is pressure-fried chicken pieces, seasoned with Sanders' recipe of 11 herbs and spices. The constituents of the recipe represent a notable trade secret. Larger portions of fried chicken are served in a cardboard "bucket", which has become a well-known feature of the chain since it was first introduced by franchisee Pete Harman in 1957. Since the early 1990s, KFC has expanded its menu to offer other chicken products such as chicken fillet sandwiches and wraps, as well as salads and side dishes such as French fries and coleslaw, desserts, and soft drinks; the latter often supplied by PepsiCo. KFC is known for its slogans "It's Finger Lickin' Good!", "Nobody does chicken like KFC", and "So good".

Kanga (song)

"Kanga" (stylized in all caps) is a song by American hip hop artist 6ix9ine from his debut studio album, Dummy Boy (2018). It features rap artist Kanye West. 6ix9ine teases his signature catchphrase in the song.

Man's best friend (phrase)

"Man's best friend" is a common phrase about domestic dogs, referring to their millennia-long history of close relations, loyalty, and companionship with humans. The first recorded use of a related phrase is by Frederick the Great of Prussia. It was likely popularized by its use in a poem by Ogden Nash and has since become a common colloquialism.

Before the evolution of wolf into dog, it is posited that humans and wolves worked together hunting game. Wolves were the superior tracker but humans were the superior killer; thus wolves would lead humans to the prey and humans would leave some of the meat to the wolves. This working relationship eventually led to the evolution of dogs, though there is controversy as to the exact nature of that transition. Some say wolves evolved naturally into dogs, wherein the wolf that worked best with humans slowly began to assimilate and pass their domesticated genes down. Others say that humans took wolf cubs and raised them to be domesticated. Either way, humans and dogs formed a working relationship.Before the 19th century, breeds of dogs (other than lap dogs) were largely functional. They performed activities such as hunting, watching, and guarding; and language describing the dog often reflected these roles. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, “In the oldest proverbs and phrases dogs are rarely depicted as faithful or as man’s best friend, but as vicious, ravening, or watchful.” Beginning in the 18th century, multiplying in the 19th and flourishing in the 20th century, language and attitudes towards dogs began to shift. Possibly, this societal shift can be attributed to discovery of the rabies vaccine in 1869.

Monte Moore

Monte Moore is a former radio and television broadcaster for the Kansas City Athletics and Oakland Athletics baseball teams.

Mr. T

Laurence Tureaud (born May 21, 1952), known professionally as Mr. T, is an American actor, bodyguard, television personality, and retired professional wrestler, known for his roles as B. A. Baracus in the 1980s television series The A-Team and as boxer Clubber Lang in the 1982 film Rocky III.

Mr. T is known for his distinctive hairstyle inspired by warriors of Mandinka nation in West Africa, his gold jewelry, and his tough-guy image. In 2006, he starred in I Pity the Fool, a reality show shown on TV Land; the title of the show comes from the famous catchphrase used by his character, Clubber Lang.

Toy Story

Toy Story is a 1995 American computer-animated buddy-adventure comedy film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The feature-film directorial debut of John Lasseter, it was the first feature-length film to be entirely computer-animated, as well as the first feature film from Pixar. The screenplay was written by Joss Whedon, Andrew Stanton, Joel Cohen, and Alec Sokolow from a story by Lasseter, Pete Docter, Stanton, and Joe Ranft. The film features music by Randy Newman, and was executive-produced by Steve Jobs and Edwin Catmull. The film features the voices of Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Don Rickles, Wallace Shawn, John Ratzenberger, Jim Varney, Annie Potts, R. Lee Ermey, John Morris, Laurie Metcalf and Erik von Detten. Taking place in a world where anthropomorphic toys come to life when humans are not present, its plot focuses on the relationship between an old-fashioned pullstring cowboy doll named Woody and an astronaut action figure Buzz Lightyear as they evolve from rivals competing for the affections of their owner Andy, to friends who work together to be reunited with him after being separated from him.

Pixar, which had produced short animated films to promote their computers, was approached by Disney to produce a computer-animated feature film after the success of their short film Tin Toy (1988), which is told from a small toy's perspective. Lasseter, Stanton, and Docter wrote early story treatments which were rejected by Disney, who wanted the film's tone to be "edgier". After several disastrous story reels, production was halted and the script was re-written, better reflecting the tone and theme Pixar desired: that "toys deeply want children to play with them, and that this desire drives their hopes, fears, and actions". The studio, then consisting of a relatively small number of employees, produced the film under minor financial constraints.

Toy Story was released in theaters on November 22, 1995, and was the highest-grossing film on its opening weekend, eventually earning over $373 million at the worldwide box office. It was positively reviewed by critics and audiences, who praised the animation's technical innovation, the wit and thematic sophistication of the screenplay, Randy Newman's score, and the performances of Hanks and Allen; it is considered by many to be one of the best animated films ever made. The film received three Academy Award nominations, including Best Original Screenplay, Best Original Score, and Best Original Song for "You've Got a Friend in Me", as well as winning a Special Achievement Academy Award. In 2005, it was inducted into the National Film Registry as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" in its first year of eligibility. In addition to home media and theatrical re-releases, Toy Story-inspired material includes toys, video games, theme park attractions, spin-offs, merchandise, and two sequels — Toy Story 2 (1999) and Toy Story 3 (2010) — both of which also garnered massive commercial success and critical acclaim, with a fourth film titled Toy Story 4 scheduled for release in 2019.

Where's the beef?

"Where's the beef?" is a catchphrase in the United States and Canada introduced in 1984. The phrase originated as a slogan for the fast food chain Wendy's. Since then it has become an all-purpose phrase questioning the substance of an idea, event or product.

Who shot J.R.?

"Who shot J.R.?" is an advertising catchphrase that American network CBS created in 1980 to promote the television series Dallas. It referred to the mystery surrounding a murder attempt against villain J.R. Ewing in the show's third season finale, "A House Divided". The mystery and its catchphrase became a global phenomenon, with international oddsmakers setting odds for the culprit. The mystery was not resolved until the fourth episode of the fourth season titled "Who Done It", which aired eight months later, with an estimated 350 million viewers tuning in.

The catchphrase has a strong legacy in pop culture and the format helped popularize the cliffhanger ending for television series.

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