Catalina State Park

Catalina State Park is a state park of Arizona, United States, that is adjacent to Coronado National Forest on the western slopes of the Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson. Catalina State Park has an average elevation of 3,000 feet (910 m) but varies dramatically with high ridges and low creek beds. The park includes 5,493 acres (2,223 ha) and is administered by Arizona State Parks in conjunction with the U.S. Forest Service. Catalina State Park is accessed from the town of Oro Valley on Arizona State Route 77, 9 miles (14 km) north of Tucson.

Catalina Lake State Park
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Catalina State Park in Oro Valley, Arizona
Map showing the location of Catalina Lake State Park
Map showing the location of Catalina Lake State Park
Location in Arizona
Map showing the location of Catalina Lake State Park
Map showing the location of Catalina Lake State Park
Catalina Lake State Park (the United States)
LocationOro Valley, Pima, Arizona, United States
Coordinates32°25′0″N 110°56′15″W / 32.41667°N 110.93750°WCoordinates: 32°25′0″N 110°56′15″W / 32.41667°N 110.93750°W
Area5,493 acres (22.23 km2)
Elevation2,854 ft (870 m)[1]
Established1974
Governing bodyArizona State Parks, U.S. Forest Service

Cultural history

There is evidence that the park and surrounding area have been continuously occupied since about 5000 BCE by the Hohokam people. The Romero Ruin still contains pueblos built of rock and adobe, as well as a Mesoamerican ballcourt. The earliest date the pueblo would have been lived in is between 550–600 CE. The site was widely used for nearly 400 years; 1000–1450 CE.

The namesake of this ruin, Francisco Romero, built a ranch on the site in the 19th century, and most likely used stone from the previous Hohokam structure to build his house, and fortifications to protect him from the Apache.

Recreation

Catalina State Park has a number of hiking and backpacking trails, including Romero Ruin Trail, Nature Trail, Romero Canyon Trail, Sutherland Trail, Canyon Loop Trail, 50-Year Trail, Birding Trail, and the Bridle Trail. Specific trails are also open to equestrians. Certain trails also connect with other trails in Coronado National Forest, continuing to Mount Lemmon, the highest peak in the Santa Catalina Mountains at 9,157 feet (2,791 m). The park also features several campgrounds and an equestrian center.

References

  1. ^ "Catalina State Park". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. 1991-12-01. Retrieved 2011-03-12.

External links

Canyon del Oro High School

Canyon del Oro High School (CDO) is a comprehensive public high school in Oro Valley, Arizona, located 6 miles (9.7 km) north of Tucson at the base of Pusch Ridge. Established as a high school in 1964, CDO is one of three high schools of Amphitheater Public Schools and serves about 1,600 students in grades 9–12. The school name originates from the remote Canyon del Oro (Spanish for Canyon of Gold) in the nearby Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson. The school mascot is the Dorado (from the Legend of El Dorado), a mythical Latin American warrior, and the school colors are forest green and gold. The Dorado mascot was originally designed by former art teacher Diane Redhair in the mid-1960s.CDO is primarily known for its academic program and the notable number of Major League Baseball players the school has produced in recent decades. CDO is statistically one of the highest achieving schools in Arizona, both academically and athletically. In 2007, 2010, and again in 2011, Newsweek Magazine rated CDO in the top 5% of public schools in the U.S., one of a handful of schools in Arizona included on the list. In 2011, Newsweek ranked CDO No. 408 in its list of top public schools in the U.S. (top 1.5 percent nationally). From 2005 to the present, CDO has consistently been academically classified as Excelling by the Arizona Department of Education (top 10 percent in Arizona). Between 2000 and 2010, CDO has graduated 42 National Merit Scholarship Semifinalists. CDO is also home to the 2011 Arizona Academic Decathlon State Champions, with the team finishing 5th in the National Academic Decathlon competition. The team placed as State Champion in 2009, finishing 4th in the National Academic Decathlon, State Runner-Up in 2007, 2008, and 2010, and was State Champion in 2006, finishing 5th in the National Academic Decathlon. CDO is also ranked 6th in Arizona for the most all-time state championships in 4A & 5A (large school) team sports as of 2006 (Arizona Interscholastic Association).

Catalina, Arizona

Catalina is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pima County, Arizona, United States. The population was 7,025 at the 2000 census. Catalina continues to experience increasing population growth, while attempting to maintain its rural character. Catalina remains an unincorporated community, with no plans for annexation into any nearby towns.

List of Arizona state parks

An Arizona state park is an area of land in the U.S. state of Arizona preserved by the state for its natural, cultural, or recreational resources. The state park system in Arizona includes both state parks and state historic parks, as well as other designations such as natural areas and recreation areas. Arizona currently has 31 state park units, which are managed wholly or partly by the Arizona State Parks government agency. In 2010 several Arizona state parks were closed due to budget cuts. Some have since reopened thanks to support in the form of donations and partnerships with local agencies.

Oro Valley, Arizona

Oro Valley, incorporated in 1974, is a suburban town located 6 miles (9.7 km) north of Tucson, Arizona, United States in Pima County. According to the 2010 census, the population of the town is 41,011, an increase from 29,700 in 2000 census. Dubbed the "Upscale Tech Mecca" of Southern Arizona by the Arizona Daily Star newspaper, Oro Valley is home to over 10 high tech firms and has a median household income nearly 50% higher than the U.S. median. The town is located approximately 110 miles (180 km) southeast of the state capital of Phoenix.

Oro Valley is situated in the western foothills of the Santa Catalina Mountains at the base of Pusch Ridge. The Tortolita Mountains are located north of the town, and vistas of the Tucson valley are to the south. The town occupies the middle Cañada del Oro Valley. Oro Valley hosts a large number of residents from around the US who maintain second or winter homes in the town.

The town hosted the 2006 Pac-10 Women's Golf Championships at the Oro Valley Country Club. Oro Valley Country Club was also the site for the 2006 Girl's Junior America's Cup, a major amateur golf tournament for the Western United States Annual events in Oro Valley include the Oro Valley Festival of the Arts, El Tour de Tucson bicycle race, the Tucson Marathon, the Cactus Speed Classic for inline skaters, and the Arizona Distance Classic.

Romero Canyon

Romero Canyon is located in the Santa Catalina Mountains and part of the Coronado National Forest.

A popular hiking trail leads to the Romero Pools, which hold water even during the driest parts of the season.

The trailhead for the Romero Canyon Trail is located in the Catalina State Park.

It is possible to hike throughout the Santa Catalinas on the network of trails.

The canyon also connects to nearby Montrose Canyon.

Santa Catalina Mountains

The Santa Catalina Mountains, commonly referred to as the Catalina Mountains or the Catalinas, are north and northeast of Tucson in Arizona, United States, on Tucson's north perimeter. The mountain range is the most prominent in the Tucson area, with the highest average elevation. The highest point in the Catalinas is Mount Lemmon at an elevation of 9,157 feet (2,791 m) above sea level and receives 180 inches (460 cm) of snow annually.

Originally known by the Tohono O'odham Nation as Babad Do'ag, the Catalinas were later named in 1697 by Italian Jesuit priest Eusebio Francisco Kino in honor of St. Catherine who was the patron saint of Kino's oldest sister.The Catalinas are part of the Santa Catalina Ranger District located in the Coronado National Forest, and also include the Pusch Ridge Wilderness Area. The mountain range is considered a prominent range in the Madrean sky islands, and partially delimits the mountain ranges in the northwest of the sky island region; lower elevation bajadas associated with the Santa Cruz River Valley spread northwestwards towards Phoenix.

Catalina Sky Survey (CSS), on Mt. Lemmon, is a project to discover comets and asteroids, and to search for near-Earth objects (NEOs). More specifically, CSS is to search for any potentially hazardous asteroids that may pose a threat of impact. Its southern hemisphere counterpart, the Siding Spring Survey (SSS) was closed in 2013.

The Catalinas are a significant focus of recreational activity, with areas such as Sabino Canyon providing streams and perennial pools for visitors, by road access; Sabino Canyon is also a dayhiking access point. Catalina State Park in the western foothills of the Catalinas attracts visitors for its hiking opportunities and permanent pools in Romero Canyon. The village of Summerhaven on Mount Lemmon serves as a popular summer retreat from the heat of Arizona's lower deserts. Mount Lemmon Ski Valley is also notable as it is the southernmost ski destination in the United States.

Other mountain ranges surrounding the Santa Cruz Valley include the Santa Rita Mountains, the Rincon Mountains, the Tucson Mountains, and the Tortolita Mountains.

Sutherland Trail

Sutherland Trail is a trail near Tucson, Arizona. It is part of Catalina State Park located in Oro Valley. 10.5 miles (16.9 km) long, the trail connects to other Coronado National Forest trails which extend on to Mount Lemmon at the summit of the Catalina Mountains.

Tucson, Arizona

Tucson () is a city and the county seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States, and home to the University of Arizona. The 2010 United States Census put the population at 520,116, while the 2015 estimated population of the entire Tucson metropolitan statistical area (MSA) was 980,263. The Tucson MSA forms part of the larger Tucson-Nogales combined statistical area (CSA), with a total population of 1,010,025 as of the 2010 Census. Tucson is the second-largest populated city in Arizona behind Phoenix, both of which anchor the Arizona Sun Corridor. The city is 108 miles (174 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 mi (97 km) north of the U.S.–Mexico border. Tucson is the 33rd largest city and the 58th largest metropolitan area in the United States (2014).

Major incorporated suburbs of Tucson include Oro Valley and Marana northwest of the city, Sahuarita south of the city, and South Tucson in an enclave south of downtown. Communities in the vicinity of Tucson (some within or overlapping the city limits) include Casas Adobes, Catalina Foothills, Flowing Wells, Midvale Park, Tanque Verde, Tortolita, and Vail. Towns outside the Tucson metro area include Benson to the southeast, Catalina and Oracle to the north, and Green Valley to the south.

The Spanish name of the city, Tucsón [tukˈson], is derived from the O'odham Cuk Ṣon [tʃʊk ʂɔːn], meaning "(at the) base of the black [hill]", a reference to a basalt-covered hill now known as Sentinel Peak, also known as "A" Mountain. Tucson is sometimes referred to as "The Old Pueblo".

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