Cast Away

Cast Away is a 2000 American survival drama film directed and co-produced by Robert Zemeckis and starring Tom Hanks, Helen Hunt, and Nick Searcy. The film depicts a FedEx employee marooned on an uninhabited island after his plane crashes in the South Pacific and his attempts to survive on the island using remnants of his plane's cargo.

The film was released on December 22, 2000. It was a critical and commercial success, grossing $429 million worldwide, with Hanks being nominated for Best Actor in a Leading Role at the 73rd Academy Awards.[2]

Cast Away
Cast away film poster
Theatrical release poster
Directed byRobert Zemeckis
Produced by
Written byWilliam Broyles Jr.
Starring
Music byAlan Silvestri
CinematographyDon Burgess
Edited byArthur Schmidt
Production
company
Distributed by
Release date
  • December 22, 2000
Running time
143 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$90 million[1]
Box office$429.6 million[1]

Plot

In December 1995, Chuck Noland is a time-obsessed systems engineer who travels worldwide resolving productivity problems at FedEx depots. He is in a long-term relationship with Kelly Frears, with whom he lives in Memphis, Tennessee. Although the couple wants to get married, Chuck's busy schedule interferes with their relationship. A Christmas gathering with relatives is interrupted when Chuck is summoned to resolve a problem in Malaysia. While flying through a violent storm, his plane crashes into the Pacific Ocean. Chuck escapes from the sinking plane and is saved by an inflatable life raft, but loses the emergency locator transmitter. He clings to the life raft, loses consciousness, and floats all night before washing up on an island. After he awakens, he explores the island and soon discovers that it is uninhabited.

Several FedEx packages from the crashed plane also wash up on the shore, as well as the corpse of one of the pilots, which he buries. He initially attempts to signal for rescue and makes an escape attempt with the remnants of his life raft, but cannot pass the powerful surf and the coral reefs surrounding the island. He searches for food, water, and shelter, and opens the packages, making use of a number of items. He leaves one package, which has a pair of angel wings printed on it, unopened. During a first attempt to make fire, Chuck receives a deep wound to his hand. In anger and pain, he throws several objects, including a Wilson volleyball from one of the packages. Later, he draws a face in the bloody hand print on the ball, names it Wilson, and begins talking to it. One night, Chuck calculates that in order for the rescue workers to find the site of the plane crash, they will have to search an area twice the size of Texas, making his rescue unlikely.

Four years later, Chuck has adapted to the island's meager living conditions, having become adept at spearing fish and making fires. He also has regular conversations and arguments with Wilson, his only means of socialization. A large section of a portable toilet washes up on the island; Chuck uses it as a sail in the construction of a raft. After spending some time building and stocking the raft and waiting for optimal weather conditions (using an analemma he has created in his cave to monitor the time of year), he launches, using the sail to overcome the powerful surf. After some time on the ocean, a storm nearly tears his raft apart. The following day, as Chuck sleeps, Wilson becomes untethered and floats away from the raft. Chuck is wakened by the spray of a sounding whale, sees Wilson, and swims after him, but Wilson has gone too far to be safely retrieved. Chuck returns to the raft and collapses in tears. Later, a passing cargo ship finds him drifting.

Upon returning to civilization, Chuck learns that he has long been given up for dead; his family and acquaintances have held a funeral, Kelly has moved on and has since married and has a daughter. After reuniting, the pair profess their love for each other but, realizing they could not be together because of her commitment to her new family, they sadly part. Kelly gives Chuck the car they once shared.

Some time later, Chuck travels to Canadian, Texas, to return the unopened FedEx package with the angel wings to its sender, a woman named Bettina Peterson. No one is home, so he leaves the package at the door with a note saying that the package saved his life. He departs and stops at a deserted crossroads. A friendly woman passing by in a pickup truck stops to explain where each road leads. As she drives away, Chuck notices angel wings on the back of her truck which match those on the parcel. As Chuck is left standing at the crossroads he looks down each road, then smiles faintly as he looks in the direction of the woman's truck.

Cast

Production

Development

In a 2017 Actor Roundtable with The Hollywood Reporter, Tom Hanks stated[3]

I made Cast Away because I wanted to examine the concept of four years of hopelessness, in which you have none of the requirements for living — food, water, shelter, fire and company. But it took us six years to put together the alliance that would actually examine that. I only had a third of it, and Bill Broyles only had a third of it, until Bob Zemeckis comes along and provided that other third. I had that original idea. I was reading an article about FedEx, and I realized that 747s filled with packages fly across the Pacific three times a day. And I just thought, "What happens if that goes down?"

— Tom Hanks in 2017[3]

Filming

The film's shooting occurred between 1998 and 2000, but was not shot consecutively. Hanks gained 50 pounds (23 kg) during pre-production, for the purpose of making his transformation more dramatic. After a majority of the film was shot, production was halted for a year so that he could lose the weight and grow his hair and beard to look like he had been living on the island for years. During the year-long hiatus, Zemeckis used the same film crew to make another film, What Lies Beneath.[2]

Cast Away was filmed on Monuriki, one of the Mamanuca Islands in Fiji.[4] It is in a subgroup of the Mamanuca archipelago, which is sited off the coast of Viti Levu, Fiji's largest island. The island became a tourist attraction following the film's release. After Chuck's return, it is identified by Kelly as being "about 600 miles south of the Cook Islands," but there is actually no land between the southernmost Cook Islands of Mangaia and Antarctica.

The film essentially begins and ends in the same location, on the Arrington Ranch in the Texas Panhandle south of the city of Canadian, Texas.[5]

Music

The film's minimal score was composed by Alan Silvestri for which he won a Grammy Award in 2002. The film's soundtrack is most notable for its lack of score and creature sound effects (such as bird song or insect sounds) while Chuck is on the island, which is intended to reinforce the feeling of isolation.[6] Cast Away contains no original musical score until Chuck escapes the island. However, there is a Russian choral piece heard near the start of the film that was not composed or even recorded by Silvestri, so it does not appear on the film's soundtrack list. It is a traditional Russian song written by Lev Knipper called "Oh, My Field" ("Polyushko, Polye") and it is available on various collections of Red Army hymns.

The official soundtrack CD is an anthology of musical pieces from all films up to that point directed by Zemeckis and scored by Silvestri. The only track from Cast Away itself is the theme from the end credits.[7]

FedEx

FedEx provided access to their facilities (Memphis, Los Angeles, and Moscow) as well as airplanes, trucks, uniforms, and logistical support. A team of FedEx marketers oversaw production through more than two years of filming.[8] FedEx CEO Fred Smith made an appearance as himself for the scene where Chuck is welcomed back, which was filmed on location at FedEx's home facilities in Memphis, Tennessee. The idea of a story based on a FedEx plane crashing gave the company "a heart attack at first," but the overall story was seen as positive. FedEx, which paid no money for product placement in the film,[9] saw an increase in brand awareness in Asia and Europe following the film's release.[10]

Wilson the volleyball

Wilson The Volleyball
Wilson the volleyball

In the film, Wilson the volleyball serves as Chuck Noland's personified friend and only companion during the four years that Noland spends alone on a deserted island.[11][12][13] Named after the volleyball's manufacturer, Wilson Sporting Goods, the character was created by screenwriter William Broyles, Jr. While researching for the film, he consulted with professional survival experts, and then chose to deliberately strand himself for one week on an isolated beach in the Gulf of California, to force himself to search for water and food, and obtain his own shelter. During this time, a volleyball washed up on shore. This was the inspiration for the film's inanimate companion. From a screenwriting point of view, Wilson also serves to realistically allow dialogue in a one-person-only situation.[14][15]

One of the original volleyball props was sold at auction for $18,500 to the ex-CEO of FedEx Office, Ken May. At the time of the film's release, Wilson launched its own joint promotion centered on the fact that one of its products was "co-starring" with Tom Hanks. Wilson manufactured a volleyball with a reproduction of the bloodied handprint face on one side. It was sold for a limited time during the film's initial release and continues to be offered on the company's website. [16]

Reception

On Rotten Tomatoes, Cast Away has an approval rating of 89% based on 154 reviews, with an average rating of 7.4/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "Flawed but fascinating, Cast Away offers an intelligent script, some of Robert Zemeckis' most mature directing, and a showcase performance from Tom Hanks."[17] On Metacritic the film has a score of 73 out of 100, based on 32 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[18]

Cast Away opened in 2,774 theaters in North America and grossed $28,883,406 with an average of $10,412 per theater on its opening weekend.[19] For the four-day Christmas long holiday weekend, it took in a total of $39,852,075.[20] The film kept performing well and ended up earning $233,632,142 domestically and $196,000,000 internationally for a total of $429,632,142, well above its production budget of $90 million.[1]

Accolades

Award Category Recipients and nominees Result
73rd Academy Awards[21] Best Actor Tom Hanks Nominated
Best Sound Randy Thom, Tom Johnson, Dennis S. Sands and William B. Kaplan Nominated
54th British Academy Film Awards[22] Best Actor Tom Hanks Nominated
6th Critics' Choice Awards[23] Best Inanimate Object Wilson Won
58th Golden Globe Awards[24] Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama Tom Hanks Won
2001 MTV Movie Awards Best Action Sequence Plane crash Nominated
Best Kiss Tom Hanks and Helen Hunt Nominated
Best Male Performance Tom Hanks Nominated
Best On-Screen Duo Tom Hanks and Wilson Nominated
7th Screen Actors Guild Awards[25] Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role Tom Hanks Nominated

In popular culture

A FedEx commercial during the 2003 Super Bowl parodied the final scene of the film, in which Chuck returns a package to its sender. In this version, the woman answers the door, and when Chuck asks what was in the box, the woman replies: "Just a satellite phone, GPS locator, fishing rod, water purifier, and some seeds. Just silly stuff."[26]

Media executive Lloyd Braun of ABC Studios first suggested the idea of a Cast Away–type television series at a dinner party in 2003.[27] Thom Sherman later pitched the idea for Cast Away – The Series, but never developed the idea.[27] The concept was later developed and pitched with the title Nowhere, which later turned into the ABC show Lost.[27]

The film was referenced in the 2011 science fiction novel The Martian, by Andy Weir.

References

  1. ^ a b c "Cast Away (2000)". Box Office Mojo. January 1, 2001. Retrieved January 10, 2015.
  2. ^ a b "'Cast Away' Director Defies Categorizing". New York Times. 2000. Retrieved October 18, 2012.
  3. ^ a b Galloway, Stephen (November 30, 2017). "Actor Roundtable: Tom Hanks, James Franco and More on 'Predators Everywhere' and Secrets of 'Legends'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on October 4, 2018. Retrieved December 8, 2017.
  4. ^ Fiji. Korina Miller, Robyn Jones, Leonardo Pinheiro. Lonely Planet. 2003. p. 54. ISBN 1-74059-134-8.
  5. ^ Carlson, Paul (August 2007). "Cast Away and the Texas Panhandle" (PDF). The Cyclone, Volume XIV, Issue 2. West Texas Historical Association. pp. 1–2. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  6. ^ Cast Away DVD director's commentary
  7. ^ "Cast Away: The Films of Robert Zemeckis and the Music of Alan Silvestri". allmusic. Retrieved June 2, 2009.
  8. ^ "`Cast Away' Delivers Goods For Fedex". Chicago Tribune. 2001.
  9. ^ "Stranded: Behind-the-Scenes of Cast Away, A comprehensive behind-the-scenes look at Cast Away". Stumped Magazine. 2004. Archived from the original on July 16, 2011. Retrieved December 27, 2009.
  10. ^ "A look at some of the biggest hits in film and TV product placement". The Hollywood Reporter. April 28, 2005. Archived from the original on September 3, 2006. Retrieved November 25, 2007.
  11. ^ "Cast Away lets Hanks fend for himself". Detroit News. December 22, 2000. Retrieved November 26, 2008.
  12. ^ Nate Smith (January 7, 2001). "Cast Away proves great films still exist". Daily Gazette. Retrieved November 26, 2008.
  13. ^ Vanneman, Alan. "The Volleyball in the Void". Bright Lights Film Journal. Retrieved November 26, 2008.
  14. ^ Hepola, Sarah (December 29, 2000). "Lost at Sea and Back Again". The Austin Chronicle.
  15. ^ Natale, Richard (December 20, 2000). "Casting About". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  16. ^ "Wilson Cast Away Volleyball". Wilson Sporting Goods. Retrieved April 27, 2014.
  17. ^ "Cast Away". Rotten Tomatoes. December 22, 2000. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  18. ^ "Cast Away". Metacritic. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  19. ^ "Weekend Box Office Results for December 22-24, 2000". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  20. ^ "Weekend Box Office Results for December 22-25, 2000". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  21. ^ "The 73rd Academy Awards (2001) Nominees and Winners". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on April 14, 2012. Retrieved November 19, 2011.
  22. ^ Wolf, Matt (February 26, 2001). "'Gladiator' Gets 5 British Awards". Topeka Capital-Journal. Associated Press. Archived from the original on January 9, 2017. Retrieved October 9, 2013.
  23. ^ "The 6th Critics' Choice Movie Awards Winners and Nominees". Broadcast Film Critics Association. Archived from the original on January 4, 2012.
  24. ^ Breznican, Anthony (January 22, 2001). "A 'Gladiator's' Triumph; 'Famous,' Tom Hanks, Julia Roberts Also Win Golden Globes". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on November 5, 2013. Retrieved October 9, 2013. (Subscription required (help)).
  25. ^ Schaefer, Stephen (January 31, 2001). "SAG might shake up Oscar field". The Boston Herald. Archived from the original on November 11, 2013. Retrieved October 9, 2013. (Subscription required (help)).
  26. ^ "Why no matches in the FedEx box?: FedEx parody commercial makes deliberate decision not to help provide fire to its own castaway". CNN. January 27, 2003. Retrieved March 4, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c "Cast Away". Chicago. August 2007. Retrieved December 27, 2008.

External links

Alan Silvestri

Alan Anthony Silvestri (born March 26, 1950) is an American composer and conductor known for his film and television scores.

He is best known for his frequent collaboration with Robert Zemeckis, composing for such major hit films as the Back to the Future trilogy, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Cast Away, and Forrest Gump, as well as the superhero films Captain America: The First Avenger, The Avengers, and Avengers: Infinity War. His other film scores include Predator and its sequel Predator 2, The Abyss, Stuart Little, The Mummy Returns, Lilo & Stitch, Night at the Museum, and Ready Player One. He is a two-time Academy Award and Golden Globe Award nominee, and a three-time Saturn Award and Primetime Emmy Award recipient.

Arthur (season 7)

The 7th season of the television series Arthur was originally broadcast on PBS in the United States from October 8 to November 29, 2002 and contains 10 episodes. The special "Arthur, It's Only Rock 'N' Roll" served as the premiere of this season. Jason Szwimmer replaced Oliver Grainger as the voice of D.W. Alex Hood is cast as the new voice of Alan "The Brain" Powers, replacing Steven Crowder. Mark Rendall replaced Justin Bradley as Arthur (who would later dub on re-runs of season 6, due to Justin Bradley's dialogue being unfavorable). This is the last season in which Patricia Rodriguez voices Catherine Frensky, and this is the final season in which Mitchell Rothpan voices George Lundgren. The series won a Daytime Emmy in 2003 for

Outstanding Sound Mixing - Live Action and Animation.

Arthur Schmidt (film editor)

Arthur Robert Schmidt (born June 17, 1937) is an American film editor with about 27 film credits between 1977 and 2005. Schmidt has had an extended collaboration with director Robert Zemeckis from Back to the Future (1985) to Cast Away (2000).

Schmidt is the son of film editor Arthur P. Schmidt; it is said that the son's education in editing began when he watched his father editing the film Sunset Boulevard (1950). Schmidt graduated from Santa Clara University with a bachelor's degree in English.

Schmidt received the Academy Award for Best Film Editing for Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) and Forrest Gump (1994). In addition to these Oscars, Schmidt has won several "Eddies" from the American Cinema Editors for Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (with Craig Wood and Stephen E. Rivkin, 2003), Forrest Gump, and for a television special The Jericho Mile (1979). He has been nominated for major editing awards (including the BAFTA Award for Best Editing) for Coal Miner's Daughter (1980), Back to the Future (with Harry Keramidas, 1985), The Last of the Mohicans (with Dov Hoenig, 1992), and Cast Away (2000). He was the executive producer for The Labyrinth (2010).Schmidt received the 2009 American Cinema Editors Career Achievement Award, which was presented to Schmidt by Robert Zemeckis.

Brett Eldredge (album)

Brett Eldredge is the eponymous fourth studio album by American country music artist Brett Eldredge. It was released on August 4, 2017.

Desert Island Discs

Desert Island Discs is a radio programme broadcast on BBC Radio 4. It was first broadcast on the BBC Forces Programme on 29 January 1942.Each week a guest, called a 'castaway' during the programme, is asked to choose eight recordings (usually, but not always, music), a book and a luxury item that they would take if they were to be cast away on a desert island, whilst discussing their lives and the reasons for their choices. It was devised and originally presented by Roy Plomley. Since 2006, the programme has been presented by Kirsty Young.

More than 3,000 episodes have been recorded, with some guests having appeared more than once and some episodes featuring more than one guest. An example of a guest who falls into both categories is Bob Monkhouse, who appeared with his co-writer Denis Goodwin on 12 December 1955 and in his own right on 20 December 1998.

Don Burgess (cinematographer)

Don Michael Burgess, , (born May 28, 1956) is an American cinematographer who was nominated for the Academy Award and BAFTA Award for Best Cinematography for Forrest Gump (1994), directed by frequent collaborator Robert Zemeckis. Burgess was Director of Photography for films including Cast Away (2000), Spider-Man (2002), The Polar Express (2004) Enchanted (2007), Source Code (2011), The Muppets (2011), The Conjuring 2 (2016), and Aquaman (2018). He studied at the ArtCenter College of Design in Los Angeles.

Flight (2012 film)

Flight is a 2012 American drama film directed by Robert Zemeckis and written by John Gatins. It stars Denzel Washington as William "Whip" Whitaker Sr., an alcoholic airline pilot who miraculously crash-lands his plane after it suffers an in-flight mechanical failure, saving nearly everyone on board. Immediately following the crash, he is hailed a hero, but an investigation soon leads to questions that put the captain in a different light.

This film is inspired by the plane crash of Alaska Airlines Flight 261. A box office success generating positive reviews, Flight is the first live-action film directed by Zemeckis since Cast Away and What Lies Beneath in 2000, and his first R-rated film since Used Cars in 1980. The film was nominated twice at the 85th Academy Awards, for Best Actor (Washington) and Best Original Screenplay (Gatins).

Helen Hunt

Helen Elizabeth Hunt (born June 15, 1963) is an American actress, director, and screenwriter. She is best known for starring as Jamie Buchman in the sitcom Mad About You (1992–1999), for which she won four Primetime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series, and for starring as Carol Connelly in the romantic comedy film As Good as It Gets (1997), for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress.

Hunt's other notable films include Twister (1996), Cast Away (2000), What Women Want (2000), Pay It Forward (2000), and The Sessions (2012). Hunt's performance in The Sessions garnered her an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress. She made her directorial debut with the comedy-drama film Then She Found Me (2007). Hunt has also won four Golden Globe Awards and two Screen Actors Guild Awards.

ImageMovers

ImageMovers is an American independent film production company founded by director Robert Zemeckis and producers Jack Rapke and Steve Starkey in 1997. The company is known for producing such films as Cast Away (2000), What Lies Beneath (2000) and The Polar Express (2004). From 2007 to 2011, The Walt Disney Company and ImageMovers founded a joint venture animation facility known as ImageMovers Digital which produced two performance captured animated films: A Christmas Carol (2009) and Mars Needs Moms (2011) for Walt Disney Pictures.

Jenifer Lewis

Jenifer Jeanette Lewis (born January 25, 1957) is an American actress, singer and activist. She began her career appearing in Broadway musicals and worked as a back-up singer for Bette Midler before appearing in films Beaches (1988) and Sister Act (1992).

Lewis is known for playing roles of mothers in the films What's Love Got to Do With It (1993), Poetic Justice (1993), The Preacher's Wife (1996), The Brothers (2001), Think Like a Man and in the sequel Think Like a Man Too (2014), Baggage Claim (2013), and The Wedding Ringer (2015), as well as in The Temptations TV miniseries (1998). As such, Lewis earned the title "Black Mother of Hollywood". She also provided the voice for Mama Odie in Disney's animated feature The Princess and the Frog (2009). Additional film roles include Dead Presidents (1995), Cast Away (2000), and Hereafter (2010).

On television, Lewis starred as Lana Hawkins in the Lifetime medical drama Strong Medicine from 2000 to 2006. She also had recurring roles on sitcoms A Different World, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and Girlfriends. In 2014, Lewis began starring as Ruby Johnson in the ABC comedy series Black-ish, for which she received two Critics' Choice Television Award nominations.

List of 2001 box office number-one films in Australia

This is a list of films which placed number-one at the weekend box office in Australia during 2001. Amounts are in Australian dollars.

N/A denotes information that is not available from Urban Cinefile nor Movie Marshal.

List of 2001 box office number-one films in the United Kingdom

This is a list of films which have placed number one at the weekend box office in the United Kingdom during 2001.

Mamanuca Islands

The Mamanuca Islands (Fijian: [mamaˈnuða]) of Fiji are a volcanic archipelago lying to the west of Nadi and to the south of the Yasawa Islands. The group, a popular tourist destination, consists of about 20 islands, but about seven of these are covered by the Pacific Ocean at high tide.

The islands offer crystal clear waters, palm fringed sandy beaches and live coral reefs. There are islands, villages, resorts to visit, snorkel and swim.

The coastal/marine ecosystem and recreation value of the archipelago contribute to its national significance as outlined in Fiji's Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan.One of the islands, Monuriki, was made famous as the anonymous island that featured in the 2000 Robert Zemeckis film, Cast Away, starring Tom Hanks.

Miss Cast Away and the Island Girls

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Rick Carter

Rick Carter (born 1950) is an American production designer and art director. He is known for his work in the film Forrest Gump, which earned him an Oscar nomination, as well as numerous nominations of other awards for his work in Amistad and A.I. Artificial Intelligence. Other films include Cast Away, War of the Worlds, What Lies Beneath, Jurassic Park, Avatar, and Back to the Future Part II and Part III. Many of the films that he has worked on are directed by Steven Spielberg or Robert Zemeckis. For his part in the Art Direction of Avatar, he was awarded the Academy Award for Best Production Design alongside Robert Stromberg and Kim Sinclair. In 2013, Carter won his second Academy Award, for production design on Steven Spielberg's biopic, Lincoln.

Robert Zemeckis

Robert Lee Zemeckis (; born May 14, 1952) is an American director, film producer and screenwriter frequently credited as an innovator in visual effects. He first came to public attention in the 1980s as the director of Romancing the Stone (1984) and the science-fiction comedy Back to the Future film trilogy, as well as the live-action/animated comedy Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988). In the 1990s he directed Death Becomes Her and then diversified into more dramatic fare, including 1994's Forrest Gump, for which he won an Academy Award for Best Director; the film itself won Best Picture. The films he has directed have ranged across a wide variety of genres, for both adults and families.

Zemeckis' films are characterized by an interest in state-of-the-art special effects, including the early use of the insertion of computer graphics into live-action footage in Back to the Future Part II (1989) and Forrest Gump, and the pioneering performance capture techniques seen in The Polar Express (2004), Monster House (2006), Beowulf (2007), A Christmas Carol (2009) and Welcome to Marwen (2018). Though Zemeckis has often been pigeonholed as a director interested only in special effects, his work has been defended by several critics including David Thomson, who wrote that "No other contemporary director has used special effects to more dramatic and narrative purpose."

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Sony Pictures Imageworks

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SPI has provided visual effects for many films; most recent include Spider-Man: Homecoming, Kingsman: The Golden Circle, and The Meg. They also provided services for several of director Robert Zemeckis' films, including Contact, Cast Away, The Polar Express, and Beowulf.

Since the foundation of its sister company Sony Pictures Animation in 2002, SPI would go on to animate nearly all of SPA's films, including Open Season, Surf's Up, The Emoji Movie, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, and films in the Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Smurfs and Hotel Transylvania franchises, in addition to animating films for other studios such as Arthur Christmas for Aardman Animations (co-produced by SPA), Storks and Smallfoot for the Warner Animation Group, and The Angry Birds Movie and its sequel for Rovio Animation.

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