Cashbox (magazine)

Cashbox is a music industry trade magazine iconic brand. Originally published weekly from July 1942 to November 1996. Ten years after its dissolution, it was revived as Cashbox Magazine, an online-only weekly chart that occasionally publishes special print issues.[1]

Cashbox
CategoriesMusic industry, trade magazine
First issueJuly 1942 (original version)
2006 (revived Internet-only version)
Final issueNovember 16, 1996 (original version)
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Websitecashboxmagazine.com
ISSN0008-7289

History

Cashbox is one of several magazines that published record charts in the United States. Its most prominent competitors are Billboard and Record World (known as Music Vendor prior to April 1964). Unlike Billboard, Cash Box initially combines all currently available recordings of a song into one chart position with artist and label information shown for each version, alphabetized by label. Originally, no indication of which version was the biggest seller was given, but from October 25, 1952, a star was placed next to the names of the most important artists. Cash Box also printed shorter jukebox charts which included specific artist data beginning in the spring of 1950. Separate charts were presented for juke box popularity, record sales, and radio airplay, similar to Billboard's methodology prior to August 1958, when Billboard debuted its "Hot 100", which attempted to combine all measures of popularity into one all-encompassing chart. In addition, Cash Box published chart data for specific genres, such as country music and R&B music.

Cashbox was reinvented as an online magazine in 2006, with the consent and cooperation of the family of George Albert, the late president and publisher of the original edition. Cashbox has occasionally issued special print editions. As of April 2015, Cashbox Magazine has added the following music charts: Roots Music, Bluegrass Singles, Bluegrass Gospel Singles, Beach Music Top 40, Roadhouse Blues and Boogie Top 40, Country Christian Top 100 Singles, and Southern Gospel Singles. The online magazine also relaunched the Looking Ahead Charts on March 1, 2015, covering all genres of music. The Cashbox Top 100 has been expanded to the Top 200. All chart data for the main Cashbox charts is provided by Digital Radio Tracker.

The current leadership of Cashbox includes Ed Russell, Doug Stroud, Harold Miller, Christopher Elrod, John Hook, Tommy Smith, David Bowling, Randy Price, Father Jim Drucker, and Lee Vyborny. Featured columnists include Jim Rose and nationally syndicated music columnist, Jerry Osborne. The Cashbox legal advisor is Mike Duncan. Sandy Graham is CEO of Cashbox Canada. Shane and Robert Bartosh control the Roots data.

In 2013, Joel Whitburn's Record Research Inc. published a history of the Cash Box singles chart data covering October 1952 through the 1996 demise of the original magazine. Randy Price maintains the original Cash Box data for the online archives.

The Swem Library at The College of William and Mary[2] maintains the archive of the original print editions of Cash Box magazine.

Bruce Elrod is the owner and remains the registered agent for Cashbox.

The Chicago blues band the Cash Box Kings credit the magazine for their name.

Cashbox headquarter now operates out of Ridgeway, South Carolina.[3]

References

  1. ^ "Cashbox Magazine". cashboxmagazine.com. Retrieved 22 March 2014.
  2. ^ "Cash Box". digitalarchive.wm.edu. Retrieved 22 March 2014.
  3. ^ "BBB Accredited Business Review for Cashbox Magazine, Inc".

External links

List of Cash Box Top 100 number-one singles of 1969

These are the number-one singles of 1969 according to the Top 100 Singles chart in Cashbox magazine.

List of Cash Box Top 100 number-one singles of 1985

These are the singles that reached number one on the Top 100 Singles chart in 1985 as published by Cashbox magazine.

Paul Revere

Paul Revere (; December 21, 1734 O.S. (January 1, 1735 N.S.) – May 10, 1818) was an American silversmith, engraver, early industrialist, and Patriot in the American Revolution. He is best known for his midnight ride to alert the colonial militia in April 1775 to the approach of British forces before the battles of Lexington and Concord, as dramatized in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem, "Paul Revere's Ride" (1861).

At age 41, Revere was a prosperous, established and prominent Boston silversmith. He had helped organize an intelligence and alarm system to keep watch on the British military. Revere later served as a Massachusetts militia officer, though his service ended after the Penobscot Expedition, one of the most disastrous campaigns of the American Revolutionary War, for which he was absolved of blame.

Following the war, Revere returned to his silversmith trade. He used the profits from his expanding business to finance his work in iron casting, bronze bell and cannon casting, and the forging of copper bolts and spikes. In 1800 he became the first American to successfully roll copper into sheets for use as sheathing on naval vessels.

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