Carroll Dale

Carroll Wayne Dale (born April 24, 1938) is a former American football wide receiver.[1] He was an All-American at Virginia Tech and was a member of the Green Bay Packers teams that won three straight NFL championships, including the first two Super Bowls. He was originally from Wise, Virginia.

Carroll Dale
No. 81, 84
Born:April 24, 1938 (age 80)[1]
Wise, Virginia
Career information
Position(s)Wide receiver
CollegeVirginia Tech
AFL draft1960 / Round: 1 / Pick: First Selections
Drafted byMinneapolis AFL team
NFL draft1960 / Round: 8 / Pick: 86
Career history
As player
1960–1964Los Angeles Rams
1965–1972Green Bay Packers
1973Minnesota Vikings
Career highlights and awards
Pro Bowls3
HonorsPackers Hall of Fame[2]
Career stats
Receptions438
Yards8,277
Touchdowns52
Rushing Attempts4
Rushing Yards30

Early life

He grew up in Wise, Virginia and played football for J. J. Kelly High School.

Career

College Football

Dale was a player for Virginia Tech from 1956-1959. He was named second-team All American in 1958 and 1959.[2] and was Southern Conference Media player of the year in 1958.[3]

Professional Football

He was selected in the 1960 NFL Draft by the Los Angeles Rams, the 86th overall pick, where he played for five years. On April 13, 1965, he was traded to the Green Bay Packers in exchange for linebacker Dan Currie. The speedy Dale was a very important contribution for the Packers' historic run of three consecutive NFL championships, which included Super Bowls I and II. He played eight seasons in Green Bay, and after a year with the Minnesota Vikings, he retired from the NFL after the 1973 season, having amassed 438 receptions for 8,277 yards and 52 touchdowns and four rushes for 30 yards.[2]

College Athletics Administrator

Dale was named director of athletics at the University of Virginia's College at Wise in 1991.[4]

Honors

Dale was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame (the state-wide organization that recognizes athletic achievements by state natives, or who played or coached for teams in the state) in 1976, Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1979[5] and into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1987.[6] His number (84) was retired by Virginia Tech.[7] and he was in the inaugural class of inductees to the Virginia Tech Sports Hall of Fame.[8]

Carroll Dale Stadium, the football stadium of Dale's alma mater, J. J. Kelly High School, was named for him.


Dale currently resides in his birthplace, Wise, Virginia.

References

  1. ^ a b "Carroll Wayne Dale". Oldest Living Football. Retrieved October 2, 2012.
  2. ^ a b c Valencia, Jorge (February 6, 2011). "Southwest Virginia Native Has Packer Pride". The Roanoke Times. Archived from the original on February 2, 2013. Retrieved October 2, 2012.
  3. ^ "Individual Awards SOCON Football 1933-2003". Southern Conference. Retrieved 11 February 2019.
  4. ^ "Former NFL Standout leads UVa-Wise Athletic Development Efforts" (PDF). Retrieved January 30, 2019.
  5. ^ "Player – Carroll Dale". Packer Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on December 9, 2012. Retrieved October 2, 2012.
  6. ^ "Carroll Dale". College Football Hall of Fame. Football Foundation. Retrieved October 2, 2012.
  7. ^ "Carroll Dale – Retired Number 84". Hokie Sports. Retrieved October 2, 2012.
  8. ^ "Virginia Tech Sports Hall of Fame". hokiesports.com. Retrieved 9 March 2019.

External links

1965 NFL Championship Game

The 1965 National Football League Championship Game was the 33rd championship game for the National Football League (NFL), played on January 2, 1966, at Lambeau Field in Green Bay, Wisconsin. This was the first NFL championship game played in January, televised in color, and the last one played before the Super Bowl era.

The game matched the Eastern Conference champion Cleveland Browns (11–3), the defending NFL champions, and the Green Bay Packers (10–3–1) of the Western Conference. A week earlier, the Packers defeated the Baltimore Colts in a tiebreaker Western Conference playoff at County Stadium in Milwaukee, while the Browns were idle. The Packers were making their first appearance in the championship game in three years, since their consecutive wins in 1961 and 1962. Green Bay was relegated to the third place Playoff Bowl the previous two seasons, with a victory over the Browns and a loss to the St. Louis Cardinals.

The home field for the NFL title game alternated between the conferences; in odd-numbered seasons, the Western team was the host. Home field advantage was not implemented in the NFL playoffs until 1975.

With the 23–12 victory, the Packers won their ninth NFL title, sixth in the championship game era.

1966 Green Bay Packers season

The 1966 Green Bay Packers season was their 48th season overall and their 46th in the National Football League. The defending NFL champions had a league-best regular season record of 12–2, led by eighth-year head coach Vince Lombardi and quarterback Bart Starr, in his eleventh NFL season.

The Packers beat the Dallas Cowboys in the NFL championship game, the Packers' second consecutive NFL title, fourth under Lombardi, and tenth for the franchise. Two weeks later, the Packers recorded a 35–10 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs in the inaugural AFL-NFL Championship Game, retroactively known as Super Bowl I.

Quarterback Starr was named the league's most valuable player (MVP) in 1966. Said Cold Hard Football Facts about Starr's 1966 season, "Starr, always underappreciated, was at his classic assassin-like best in 1966, his lone MVP season. He led the league in completion percentage, yards per attempt and passer rating, while his 4.7-to-1 [touchdown-to-interception] ratio remains one of the very best in history. Starr, as always, cranked out great performances when he absolutely had to: the 1966 Packers, for example, were the worst rushing team in football, with a meager average of 3.5 [yards-per-attempt] on the ground, despite the reputation Lombardi's Packers still carry with them today as a dominant running team." Cold Hard Football Facts also notes that 1966 Packers had the best passer rating differential (offensive passer rating minus opponents passer rating), +56.0, in the Super Bowl Era.

In 2007, the 1966 Packers were ranked as the 6th greatest Super Bowl champions on the NFL Network's documentary series America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions.

1966 NFL Championship Game

The 1966 National Football League Championship Game was the 34th NFL championship, played at the Cotton Bowl in Dallas, Texas. It was the final game of the 1966 NFL season.

It determined the champion of the National Football League (NFL), which met the champion of the American Football League (AFL) in Super Bowl I, then formally referred to as the first AFL–NFL World Championship Game. The Western Conference champion Green Bay Packers (12–2), defending league champions, were hosted by the Dallas Cowboys (10–3–1), the Eastern Conference champions.

The home field for the NFL Championship alternated between the two conferences; even-numbered years were hosted by the Eastern and odd-numbered by the Western. Starting with the 1975 season, playoff sites were determined by regular season record, rather than a rotational basis.

The New Year's college bowl game at the Cotton Bowl for the 1966 season included the SMU Mustangs of Dallas. It was played the day before, New Year's Eve, which required a quick turnaround to transform the natural grass field. The two games were filled to the 75,504 capacity, but both local teams came up short.

1967 Green Bay Packers season

The 1967 Green Bay Packers season was their 49th season overall and their 47th season in the National Football League and resulted in a 9–4–1 record and a victory in Super Bowl II. The team beat the Dallas Cowboys in the NFL Championship Game, a game commonly known as the "Ice Bowl," which marked the second time the Packers had won an NFL-record third consecutive NFL championship, having also done so in 1931 under team founder Curly Lambeau. In the playoff era (since 1933), it remains the only time a team has won three consecutive NFL titles.

The Packers were led by ninth-year head coach Vince Lombardi and veteran quarterback Bart Starr, in his twelfth season. Green Bay's victory in Super Bowl II over the Oakland Raiders was the fifth world championship for the Packers under Lombardi and the last game he coached for the Packers.

1970 Green Bay Packers season

The 1970 Green Bay Packers season was their 52nd season overall and their 50th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–8 record earning them a third consecutive third-place finish in the four-team NFC Central division. It was the third and final season for Phil Bengtson as head coach; he resigned shortly after the season ended.

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