Carroll County, New Hampshire

Carroll County is a county in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. As of the 2010 census, the population was 47,818,[1] making it the third-least populous county in New Hampshire. Its county seat is Ossipee.[2] The county was created in 1840 and organized at Ossipee from towns removed from Strafford County. It was named in honor of Charles Carroll of Carrollton,[3] who had died in 1832, the last surviving signer of the United States Declaration of Independence.

Carroll County, New Hampshire
WakefieldNH CarrollCountyCourthouse
Map of New Hampshire highlighting Carroll County

Location within the U.S. state of New Hampshire
Map of the United States highlighting New Hampshire

New Hampshire's location within the U.S.
Founded1840
Named forCharles Carroll of Carrollton
SeatOssipee
Largest townConway
Area
 • Total992 sq mi (2,569 km2)
 • Land931 sq mi (2,411 km2)
 • Water61 sq mi (158 km2), 6.2%
Population (est.)
 • (2018)48,779
 • Density52.4/sq mi (20.2/km2)
Congressional district1st
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4
Websitewww.carrollcountynh.net

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 992 square miles (2,570 km2), of which 931 square miles (2,410 km2) is land and 61 square miles (160 km2) (6.2%) is water.[4] It is the third-largest county in New Hampshire by total area. Northern Carroll County is known for being mountainous. Several ski areas, including Cranmore Mountain, Attitash, King Pine, and Black Mountain, are located here.

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
185020,157
186020,4651.5%
187017,332−15.3%
188018,2245.1%
189018,124−0.5%
190016,895−6.8%
191016,316−3.4%
192015,017−8.0%
193014,277−4.9%
194015,5899.2%
195015,8681.8%
196015,829−0.2%
197018,54817.2%
198027,93150.6%
199035,41026.8%
200043,66623.3%
201047,8189.5%
Est. 201848,779[5]2.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2018[1]

2000 census

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 43,666 people, 18,351 households, and 12,313 families residing in the county. The population density was 18/km² (47/sq mi). There were 34,750 housing units at an average density of 14/km² (37/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 98.22% White, 0.17% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.38% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.17% from other races, and 0.77% from two or more races. 0.48% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 22.5% were of English, 15.6% Irish, 10.5% American, 9.7% French, 6.7% German, 5.8% Italian and 5.2% Scottish ancestry. 96.5% spoke English and 1.6% French as their first language.

There were 18,351 households out of which 27.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.30% were married couples living together, 7.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.90% were non-families. 26.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.82.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.60% under the age of 18, 5.30% from 18 to 24, 26.50% from 25 to 44, 27.70% from 45 to 64, and 17.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 96.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $39,990, and the median income for a family was $46,922. Males had a median income of $31,811 versus $23,922 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,931. About 5.50% of families and 7.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.00% of those under age 18 and 6.70% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 47,818 people, 21,052 households, and 13,569 families residing in the county.[11] The population density was 51.4 inhabitants per square mile (19.8/km2). There were 39,813 housing units at an average density of 42.8 per square mile (16.5/km2).[12] The racial makeup of the county was 97.5% white, 0.6% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 0.3% black or African American, 0.2% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.0% of the population.[11] In terms of ancestry,[13]

The largest ancestry group in Carroll County are people of English ancestry, who make up 29.3% of people in the county. The second largest ancestry group in the county are people of Irish ancestry who make up 24.7%. The third largest group is people of French ancestry who make up 13.8% of people in the county.[14]

Of the 21,052 households, 24.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.2% were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 35.5% were non-families, and 28.4% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.72. The median age was 48.3 years.[11]

The median income for a household in the county was $49,897 and the median income for a family was $60,086. Males had a median income of $41,634 versus $32,402 for females. The per capita income for the county was $28,411. About 6.1% of families and 9.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.6% of those under age 18 and 5.5% of those age 65 or over.[15]

Politics and government

The county is historically Republican, but in 2008 Barack Obama received 52.39% of the county's vote.[16] This made him the first Democratic presidential nominee to win the county since 1912 and the first Democratic presidential nominee to win an absolute majority in the county since 1884.

The county is politically divided between the more conservative southern half, home to several seasonal communities along the north shore of Lake Winnipesaukee including Moultonborough, Tuftonboro, and Wolfeboro, and the more liberal northern half, with several ski towns and resort towns such as Bartlett and Conway. In both the 2012 Presidential and gubernatorial elections in New Hampshire, Democratic candidates easily won the northern half of the county, and Republican candidates easily won the southern half of the county.[17]

County Commission

The executive power of Carroll County's government is held by three county commissioners, each representing one of the three commissioner districts within the county.[19]

Districts Name Hometown Party
District 1 Terry McCarthy (Clerk) Conway, NH Republican
District 2 David Babson (Vice Chair) Ossipee, NH Republican
District 3 Amanda Bevard (Chair) Wolfeboro, NH Republican

In addition to the County Commission, there are five directly-elected officials: they include County Attorney, Register of Deeds, County Sheriff, Register of Probate, and County Treasurer.[20]

Office Name
County Attorney Michaela Andruzzi (D)
Register of Deeds Lisa Scott (R)
County Sheriff Domenic Richardi (R)
County Treasurer Meg Lavender (R)

Legislative branch

The legislative branch of Carroll County is made up of all of the members of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from the county. In total, as of August 2018 there are 15 members from 8 different districts.

Affiliation Members Voting share
Democratic Party 8 53.3%
Republican Party 7 46.7%
Total 15 100%

Communities

Towns

Township

Census-designated places

Villages

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 24, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 70.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on 2014-12-27. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  11. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  12. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  13. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  14. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-04-17. Retrieved 2010-10-17.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  15. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  16. ^ "David Leip's Presidential Election Database". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 10 April 2018.
  17. ^ "President of the United States - 2012 General Election - NHSOS". sos.nh.gov. Retrieved 10 April 2018.
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 10 April 2018.
  19. ^ http://sos.nh.gov/2016CountyGen.aspx?id=8589963680
  20. ^ https://www.carrollcountynh.net/departments

External links

Coordinates: 43°52′N 71°13′W / 43.87°N 71.21°W

Bayle Mountain

Bayle Mountain is a mountain located in Carroll County, New Hampshire, standing above Conner Pond.

Eastman Mountain (New Hampshire)

Eastman Mountain is a mountain at the southern end of the Baldface-Royce Range, located in Carroll County, New Hampshire. It is accessed by the Eastman Mountain Trail. Its summit is partially open and provides good views.

Eaton, New Hampshire

Eaton is a town in Carroll County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 393 at the 2010 census. Eaton includes the villages of Eaton Center and Snowville.

Freedom, New Hampshire

Freedom is a town located in Carroll County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 1,489 at the 2010 census. The town's eastern boundary runs along the Maine state border. Ossipee Lake, with a resort and camps, is in the southwest of the town.

Kearsarge North

Kearsarge North is a mountain located about 4 miles (6 km) northeast of North Conway, Carroll County, New Hampshire. The U.S. Board on Geographic Names accepted the name "Pequawket Mountain" in 1915 but it was renamed Kearsarge North in 1957. The Pequawket are a subdivision of the Abenaki people who formerly lived in the area. It is sometimes referred to as Mount Kearsarge, a name officially assigned to a mountain in Merrimack County.

Kearsarge North is located on the eastern fringe of the White Mountains. It is drained by various brooks into the Saco River.

There are two hiking routes up Kearsarge. The first, and most popular, is the 3.1-mile (5.0 km) Mount Kearsarge North Trail, which ascends 2,600 feet (790 m) from the North Conway side of Hurricane Mountain Road, near Intervale. The Weeks Brook Trail, a much less-used 4.7-mile (7.6 km) route, approaches Kearsarge from the east, from a trailhead on Forest Road 317 in Chatham.An inn was built on the summit, only to be twice destroyed by storms. In 1909, the Appalachian Mountain Club granted the New Hampshire Forestry Commission use of the destroyed hotel for a fire lookout.

Larcom Mountain

Larcom Mountain is a mountain located in Carroll County, New Hampshire, USA. The top of the mountain, and its subpeak, Little Larcom Mountain, are part of the Lakes Region Conservation Trust.

The mountain is named after poet Lucy Larcom, who visited the area frequently while staying at the Bearcamp River House.

Little Cold River

The Little Cold River is a 3.9-mile (6.3 km) long river in western Maine in the United States, flowing through the foothills of the White Mountains. It is a tributary of the Cold River, part of the Saco River watershed.

The river begins in Chatham, New Hampshire at the junction of McDonough Brook and Watson Brook, in the easternmost part of the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire. Flowing east, the river leaves the national forest and enters Maine after only one-half mile. Turning more southeast, the river passes through the town of Stow, reaching the Cold River one mile upstream from the latter river's end at Charles Pond in Fryeburg.

Mount Roberts (New Hampshire)

Mt. Roberts is a mountain located in Carroll County, New Hampshire. The peak is located within the Lakes Region Conservation Trust's Castle in the Clouds property.

Mount Willard (New Hampshire)

Mount Willard, elevation 2,865 feet (873 m), is a mountain located in Carroll County, New Hampshire, in the center of Crawford Notch. Its summit provides excellent views, and it is accessible by the Mount Willard Trail.

The Mount Willard Trail is 3.1 miles (5.0 km) long out and back with an elevation gain of 908 feet (277 m). Dogs are able to use this trail, and it has been rated as child friendly.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Carroll County, New Hampshire

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Carroll County, New Hampshire.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Carroll County, New Hampshire, United States. Latitude and longitude coordinates are provided for many National Register properties and districts; these locations may be seen together in a map.There are 57 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county, including 1 National Historic Landmark.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted July 3, 2019.

Nickerson Mountain

Nickerson Mountain is a mountain located in Carroll County, New Hampshire, in the northeastern Ossipee Mountains. The peak was also once known as Mount Whittier, however the USGS has since labelled a mountain to the immediate west with the name.

The Mount Whittier Ski Area and scenic gondola operated on Nickerson Mountain until 1985.

Ossipee River

The Ossipee River is an 18.3-mile-long (29.5 km) river in eastern New Hampshire and western Maine in the United States. It is a tributary of the Saco River, which flows southeast to the Atlantic Ocean at Saco, Maine.

The Ossipee River begins at the village of Effingham Falls, New Hampshire, at the outlet of Berry Bay, the farthest downstream of a chain of lakes connected to Ossipee Lake. The river, flowing east, forms the border between the towns of Effingham and Freedom. Entering Maine, the river continues to serve as a municipal boundary, first between Porter and Parsonsfield, and then between Hiram and Cornish. Kezar Falls, a village in the town of Porter, forms a significant community along the river, with two dam impoundments.

Route 25 follows the river for its entire length.

Pine River (New Hampshire)

The Pine River is a 19.2-mile-long (30.9 km) river located in eastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of Ossipee Lake, part of the Saco River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.

Red Hill River

The Red Hill River is a 6.5-mile-long (10.5 km) river in the Lakes Region of central New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of Lake Winnipesaukee, part of the Merrimack River watershed.

The Red Hill River begins in the town of Sandwich, New Hampshire at the outlet of Red Hill Pond, just east of the village of Center Sandwich. The river flows generally south, through a series of wetlands, into Moultonborough. The river passes through Garland Pond, drops in a short river segment to Lees Pond, and ends at an arm of Moultonborough Bay on Lake Winnipesaukee.

Shepards River

The Shepards River is a 13.6-mile-long (21.9 km) river in western Maine and eastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is part of the Saco River drainage basin.

The Shepards River rises in the town of Eaton, New Hampshire, among foothills of the White Mountains. The river flows northeast into Brownfield, Maine, passing the villages of West Brownfield, Brownfield, and East Brownfield before reaching the Saco River east of Frost Mountain.

Several species of game fish have been caught in Shepards River, including brook trout, rainbow trout, largemouth bass, and atlantic salmon.

South River (Ossipee River tributary)

The South River is a 10.6 mile long (17.1 km) river in eastern New Hampshire and western Maine in the United States. It is a tributary of the Ossipee River, which flows east to the Saco River and ultimately the Atlantic Ocean.

The South River begins at the outlet of Province Lake in the town of Effingham, New Hampshire and proceeds north past the village of Center Effingham. Jogging east, the river enters Parsonsfield, Maine, then turns north again to reach the Ossipee River.

Turtleback Mountain (New Hampshire)

Turtleback Mountain is a 2,203-foot (671 m) mountain in the Ossipee Mountains located in Carroll County, New Hampshire, standing above Bald Knob. The summit features columnar jointing and was once home to an observation tower.

Wakefield, New Hampshire

Wakefield is a town in Carroll County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 5,078 at the 2010 census. The town includes the villages of Wakefield Corner (the original town center), East Wakefield, North Wakefield, Sanbornville, Union, Woodman and Province Lake. Wakefield Corner, popular with tourists, is a picturesque hilltop village of antique buildings. The state of Maine is on the eastern border of Wakefield.

Zealand River

The Zealand River is a 6.3-mile (10.1 km) long river in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Ammonoosuc River and part of the Connecticut River watershed.

The Zealand River flows north out of Zealand Notch in the town of Bethlehem, New Hampshire. It is paralleled first by the Zealand Trail, a hiking trail, and then by Zealand Road, maintained by the White Mountain National Forest. The river valley separates Mount Hale to the west from Mount Tom to the east. Farther north, the Rosebrook Mountains overlook the river to the east, and the small pegmatite knobs known as South, Middle, and North Sugarloaf rise to the west. The river passes the national forest Zealand Campground and reaches the Ammonoosuc River just east of the village of Twin Mountain.

Gulf of Maine
Long Island Sound
Places adjacent to Carroll County, New Hampshire
Municipalities and communities of Carroll County, New Hampshire, United States
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