Carrier strike group

A carrier strike group[1] (CSG) is an operational formation of the United States Navy. It is composed of roughly 7,500 personnel, an aircraft carrier, at least one cruiser, a destroyer squadron of at least two destroyers or frigates,[2] and a carrier air wing of 65 to 70 aircraft. A carrier strike group also, on occasion, includes submarines, attached logistics ships and a supply ship. The carrier strike group commander operationally reports to the commander of the numbered fleet, who is operationally responsible for the area of waters in which the carrier strike group is operating.

Carrier strike groups comprise a principal element of U.S. power projection capability. Previously referred to as carrier battle groups (a term still used by other nations), they are often referred to by the carrier they are associated with (e.g., Enterprise Strike Group). As of March 2016 there were 10 carrier strike groups in the U.S. navy.

The carrier strike group is a flexible naval force that can operate in confined waters or in the open ocean, during day and night, in all weather conditions. The principal role of the carrier and its air wing within the carrier strike group is to provide the primary offensive firepower, while the other ships provide defense and support. These roles are not exclusive, however. Other ships in the strike group sometimes undertake offensive operations (launching cruise missiles, for instance) and the carrier's air wing contributes to the strike group's defense (through combat air patrols and airborne anti-submarine efforts). Thus, from a command and control perspective, carrier strike groups are combat organized by mission rather than by platform.

Since 2016, the French Carier strike Group of nuclear-powered aircraft carrier FS Charles de Gaulle can plan and conduct strike operations in a U.S. Fleet area of operations with a up to 35 aircraft air wings including 30 Dassault Rafale[3] [4] [5].

The Royal Navy is in the process of rebuilding its Fleet Air Arm capacity, led by Commander UK Carrier Strike Group, a Royal Navy Commodore. The Royal Navy’s new carrier air wings will count up to 36 F-35Bs between them but the Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers may routinely deploy with only one of 12 F-35B or two squadrons joining 12 US Marine Corps aircraft, probably from either VMFA-211 or VMFA-122[6], only twenty four F-35B have been ordered by Fleet Air Arm and will be the flagship of her Carrier strike Group 21, so British carrier operations will be very strongly influenced by US Marine Corps amphibious ready group[7] plus early warning aircraft and numerous helicopters. The group will consist of at least one Type 45 destroyer, two Type 23 frigates, one Astute class attack submarine plus a number of support vessels.

Aerial bow view of George Washington Carrier Strike Group in formation for photo exercise 060429-N-9621S-014
U.S. Navy ships assigned to the USS George Washington Carrier Strike Group sail in formation for a strike group photo in the Caribbean Sea 29 April 2006. Such a formation would not be used in combat.

History

The development of the U.S. Navy carrier battle group can be traced to the 1920s and was initially based on previous experience grouping battleships and other major surface combatants. In World War II, administratively, aircraft carriers were assigned to carrier divisions (CARDIVs). Operationally they were assigned to Task Forces, of which Task Force 11, Task Force 16 and Task Force 17 perhaps gained the most fame for their roles in the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Midway. The single-carrier battle group was born with the military draw down that followed World War II. Carrier Division 1 was redesignated Carrier Group 1 on 30 June 1973,[8] and seemingly all Carrier Divisions were redesignated Carrier Groups on that date.

Throughout the 1990s, the U.S. Navy's aircraft carrier groups were officially referred to as Carrier Battle Groups (CVBGs), and were commanded by either flag officers called Cruiser-Destroyer Group (CRUDESGRU) or Carrier Group (CARGRU) commanders.[9]

In the summer of 1992, the U.S. Navy instituted a concept that mandated greater task group integration of naval air and surface warfare assets into a more permanent carrier battle group structure. Each of the Navy's 12 existing carrier battle groups consisted of an aircraft carrier; an embarked carrier air wing; cruisers, destroyer, and frigate units; and two nuclear-powered attack submarines.[10]

On 1 October 2004, carrier groups and cruiser-destroyer groups were redesignated carrier strike groups.[11] The change in nomenclature from 'Battle' to 'Strike' appears to have been connected with an increasing emphasis on projecting air power ashore; the change acknowledged that battles at sea on the Battle of Midway model were becoming more unlikely.

Missions

Carrier strike groups are tasked to accomplish a variety of wartime missions, as well as a wide variety of functions in situations short of war. The peacetime mission is to conduct forward presence operations, to help shape the strategic environment, deter conflict, build interoperability with allies, and respond to crises when necessary. The U.S. Navy provides a regular rotation of strike groups overseas, typically for six-eight months, based on the needs of Unified Combatant Commands that request strike group capabilities in their respective area of responsibility (AOR). The ships in the group often "disaggregate" from the carrier, performing missions hundreds or even thousands of miles away. The missions of the carrier strike groups include:

  • Power projection ashore against a wide range of strategic, operational, and tactical targets defended by sophisticated air defense systems, during day and night, in all weather conditions.
  • Gaining and maintaining sea control including coastal regions, bounded seas, choke points, and the open ocean.
  • Protection of commercial and military shipping.
  • Protection of a United States Marine Corps Amphibious Ready Group prior to or during an amphibious operation.
  • Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief (HA/DR).
  • Surveillance/Intelligence to achieve and maintain a comprehensive operational picture of the littoral environment, including surface, undersea, air, and relevant land areas of interest.
  • Command and Control of assigned U.S. and multinational forces.
  • Establishing air superiority or air supremacy in an area by seizing and maintaining control of designated airspace.
  • Theater ballistic missile defense (TBMD) of littoral areas and selected theater wide areas against attack.
  • Operations in support of the peacetime presence mission, including supporting U.S. diplomacy through cooperative engagement with designated allied forces, normal peacetime operations, and shows of force.[12]

Typical CSG composition

CSGs are not restricted to a specific composition and can be modified depending on expected threats, roles, or missions expected during a deployment, and one may be different from another. The Navy states that "there really is no real definition of a strike group. Strike groups are formed and disestablished on an as needed basis, and one may be different from another. However, they all are comprised of similar types of ships."[12] A U.S. Navy carrier strike group typically includes:

While the carrier strike group is the various components' operational superior, administratively the ships and the carrier air wing are assigned to different U.S. Navy type commands (TYCOMs). Aircraft carriers and Carrier Air Wings are under the administrative control of Commander, Naval Air Force U.S. Atlantic Fleet, or Commander, Naval Air Forces, Pacific. Escorts, including guided-missile cruisers and a CSG's destroyer squadron are under the administrative control of Commander, Naval Surface Forces Atlantic or Commander, Naval Surface Forces Pacific.

Composite Warfare Command structure

The Strike Group comprises several commands, all of which reside under the authority of the Commander of the CSG (CCSG or COMCARSTRKGRU). The CCSG is typically a 1-star rear admiral (lower half), who often promotes to 2-stars while in the job. He is the Immediate Superior in Command (ISIC) to the carrier, air wing, destroyer squadron, and cruiser commanding officers assigned to the strike group. As such, he is responsible for unit-level training, integrated training, and readiness for assigned ships and units, as well as maintaining administrative functions and material readiness tracking for ships and squadrons assigned to the group.

In battle, the CCSG is also known as the Composite Warfare Commander (CWC) who acts as the central command authority for the entire strike group. The CWC designates subordinate warfare commanders for various missions:

  • Strike Warfare (STWC). The Strike Warfare Commander is usually the air wing commander. He sets the general strike philosophy and employs air wing aircraft as well as strike group Tomahawk missiles.
  • Air Warfare (AWC). The commanding officer of one of the strike group cruisers is usually assigned as Air Warfare Commander. He is the only warfare commander not on the carrier, as the Combat Information Center (CIC) of AEGIS cruisers is specially designed for inner air battle functions.
  • Command & Control, Space and Electronic Warfare (C2W). The space and electronic warfare commander acts as principal advisor to CWC for use and counter-use of the electromagnetic spectrum by friendly and enemy forces. He promulgates force Emissions Control (EMCON) restrictions, monitors organic and non-organic intelligence and surveillance sensors and develops operational deception and counter-targeting plans as appropriate.
  • Surface Warfare (SUWC). The SUWC is responsible for surface surveillance coordination and war-at-sea.
  • Undersea Warfare (USWC).

SUWC and USWC responsibilities are often combined into Sea Combat Commander (SCC), usually delegated to the DESRON commander. He performs these duties from aboard the carrier due to its superior Command-Control-Communications-Computers and Intelligence (C4I) capabilities. Supporting the CWC and his warfare commanders are coordinators who manage force sensors and assets within the strike group.

List of Carrier Strike Groups

The Navy maintains 11 carrier strike groups, 10 of which are based in the United States and one that is forward deployed to Japan.[12] They were all redesignations of former Carrier Groups (CarGrus) and Cruiser-Destroyer Groups (CCDGs). The Fleet Response Plan requires that six CSGs be deployed or ready for deployment within 30 days at any given time, while two additional groups must be ready for deployment within 90 days.[13] The Navy typically maintains at least one CSG in the U.S. Fifth Fleet in Southwest Asia on rotation basis and one on permanent basis in the U.S. Seventh Fleet in the Western Pacific at all times. CSGs operate in the U.S. Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean, and U.S. Fourth Fleet around the South American continent as they transit to and from other areas. CSG Commanders report to their respective numbered-fleet commander, depending on where they are operating. When not deployed overseas west coast CSGs report to U.S. Third Fleet.

Refueling and Complex Overhaul

USS Theodore Roosevelt did not have an embarked CSG while the carrier was going through its four-year-long Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)[14] which was expected to be completed by August 2013. Theodore Roosevelt was assigned to Carrier Strike Group Twelve subsequent to deactivation of USS Enterprise on 1 December 2012.

USS Abraham Lincoln was shifted to Newport News, Virginia, for its Refueling and Complex Overhaul, in August 2012[15] which was delayed until March 2013.

On 14 January 2014, the U.S. Navy announced that USS Ronald Reagan would replace USS George Washington as the flagship of Carrier Strike Group Five, the only forward-based carrier strike group home-ported at Yokosuka, Japan, as part of the U.S. Seventh Fleet. George Washington was scheduled to shift to Newport News for its mid-life Refueling and Complex Overhaul.[16]

Permanent change-of-station status

On 14 January 2014, the U.S. Navy announced that USS Theodore Roosevelt would shift its home-port to Naval Base San Diego, California, becoming part of the U.S. Third Fleet. As such, Theodore Roosevelt and its assigned carrier strike group would also deploy to the U.S. Seventh Fleet's operating area in the western Pacific.[16]

List of active CSGs

As of January 2012 the U.S. Navy was committed to maintaining 11 carriers, but only had 10 active until USS Gerald R. Ford went into service in 2017.[17][18] On 4 August 2017, George Washington entered dry dock in Newport News, Virginia, for a four-year Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH).[19]

On 1 August 2011, the Navy announced that Carrier Strike Group Nine would change its permanent duty station from Naval Station Everett to Naval Base San Diego effective 14 December 2012.

Carrier Strike Group Last Assigned Aircraft Carrier Carrier air wing Destroyer Squadron Homeport Notes
Carrier Strike Group One
(formerly CarGru 1)
USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) Carrier Air Wing Two DESRON-1 Naval Air Station North Island [20][21]
Carrier Strike Group Two
(formerly CarGru 2)
USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77) Carrier Air Wing Eight DESRON-22 Naval Station Norfolk [22]
Carrier Strike Group Three
(formerly CarGru 3)
USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) Carrier Air Wing Nine DESRON-21 Naval Base Kitsap [23]
Carrier Strike Group Five
(formerly CarGru 5)
USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) Carrier Air Wing Five DESRON-15 Fleet Activities Yokosuka [24]
Carrier Strike Group Eight
(formerly CarGru 8)
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) Carrier Air Wing One DESRON-28 Naval Station Norfolk [25][26][27]
Carrier Strike Group Nine
(formerly CCDG 3)
USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) Carrier Air Wing Seventeen DESRON-9 Naval Base San Diego [15][28]
Carrier Strike Group Ten
(formerly CCDG 2)
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) Carrier Air Wing Three DESRON-26 Naval Station Norfolk [29][30]
Carrier Strike Group Eleven
(formerly CCDG 5)
USS Nimitz (CVN-68) Carrier Air Wing Eleven DESRON-23 Naval Station Everett [31]
Carrier Strike Group Twelve
(formerly CCDG 8)
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72)
Carrier Air Wing Seven DESRON-2 Naval Station Norfolk [32][33][34][35]

List of former CSGs

Carrier Strike Group Four was redesignated alongside the other groups in 2004, but has since been redesignated Commander Strike Force Training Atlantic.

Carrier Strike Group Six was established from Carrier Group Six with USS John F. Kennedy at Naval Station Mayport in 2004, but seems to have since been disestablished.

Carrier Strike Group Fifteen has been disestablished, and its flagship, the carrier Ronald Reagan, was reassigned to Carrier Strike Group Seven.

The deactivation of Carrier Strike Group Seven effective 30 December 2011 reflects the U.S. Navy's future budgetary reductions and the reduced availability of its operational carrier fleet and carrier air wings.[36][37]

Carrier Strike Group Last Assigned Aircraft Carrier Carrier air wing Destroyer Squadron Homeport Notes
Carrier Strike Group Four Became Commander Strike Force Training Atlantic between July 2005 and February 2006
Carrier Strike Group Six
(formerly CarGru 6)
USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) CVW-17 Naval Station Mayport
Carrier Strike Group Seven
(formerly CarGru 7)
USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) Carrier Air Wing Fourteen DESRON-7 Naval Air Station North Island [38][39]
Carrier Strike Group Fourteen
(formerly CCDG 12)
Naval Station Mayport [40]
Carrier Strike Group Fifteen
(formerly CCDG 1)
USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) Disestablished 21 March 2005 – Pacific coast

See also

References

  1. ^ navy.mil web team. "U.S. Navy Style Guide - View List".
  2. ^ Official Carrier Strike Group Seven Homepage – Ship composition Archived 25 September 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). https://ussharrystruman.wordpress.com/2016/02/22/csg-8-and-charles-de-gaulle-battle-group-lead-the-charge/. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  4. ^ Commander U.S. Naval Forces Central Command public affairs. "France Takes Command of NAVCENT Task Force 50".
  5. ^ www.navalnews.com. "A Record 35 Aircraft Aboard French Aircraft Carrier Charles De Gaulle".
  6. ^ [hhttps://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/looking-ahead-us-marine-corps-aircraft-to-embark-on-board-hms-queen-elizabeth/ "Looking ahead – US Marine Corps aircraft to embark on board HMS Queen Elizabeth"].
  7. ^ Gareth Corfield. "US Marine Corps to fly F-35s from HMS Queen Lizzie as UK won't have enough jets".
  8. ^ John Pike. "Carrier Group ONE".
  9. ^ Utz, Curtis A. (July – August 2005). "Year in Review 2004" (PDF). Naval Aviation News. Washington Yard: U.S. Navy. p. 34. Archived from the original (PDF) on 28 February 2008. Retrieved 1 December 2010. Aviation Command Changes, 2004
  10. ^ Polmar, Norman (1993). The Naval Institute Guide to the Ships and Aircraft of the U.S. Fleet, 15th ed. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. pp. 32, 36 (Table 6-5). ISBN 1-55750-675-2.
  11. ^ Curtis A. Utz and Mark L. Evans (July – August 2005). "The Year in Review 2004". Naval Aviation News. Washington, DC: U.S. Navy. Retrieved 9 November 2010. Aviation Command Changes, 2004
  12. ^ a b c d "The Carrier Strike Group". Navy Data. U.S. Navy. 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2011.
  13. ^ "Summer Pulse '04 Questions & Answers". United States Navy. 6 June 2005. Archived from the original on 7 October 2006. Retrieved 21 January 2007.
  14. ^ Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Nathan L. Lockwood, U.S.N (1 October 2009). "USS Theodore Roosevelt Transitions to Newport News Shipyard for Complex Overhaul". NNS090901-18. USS Theodore Roosevelt Public Affairs. Retrieved 1 December 2010.
  15. ^ a b "Change in Permanent Duty Station for Carrier Strike Group Nine" (PDF). OPNAV Notice 5400 Ser DNS-33/llU228546. Office of the Chief of Naval OperationsU.S. Department of the Navy. 1 August 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 March 2012. Retrieved 9 September 2011.
  16. ^ a b "Navy Aircraft Carrier Moves Underscore Pacific Rebalance Strategy". NNS140114-15. U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs. 14 January 2014. Retrieved 14 January 2014.
  17. ^ "U.S. to keep 11 aircraft carriers". 22 January 2012.
  18. ^ Jones, This story was written by Ens. Corey Todd. "President Trump Commissions USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78)". navy.mil.
  19. ^ "USS George Washington CVN-73". uscarriers.net. Retrieved 15 January 2018.
  20. ^ "Navy Establishes Carrier Strike Group 1". Navy News. Military.com. 2 October 2009. Retrieved 1 December 2010.
  21. ^ "COMCARSTRKGRU ONE". Home Page. U.S. Navy. 2010. Retrieved 1 December 2010.
  22. ^ Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Nathan A. Bailey, U.S.N (22 September 2010). "Carrier Strike Group 2 Embarks USS George H.W. Bush". NNS100922-09. USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77) Public Affairs. Archived from the original on 19 December 2012. Retrieved 20 April 2009.
  23. ^ "Carrier Strike Group Three". USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74). U.S. Navy. 2010. Archived from the original on 15 November 2010. Retrieved 2010-12-01.
  24. ^ "Forward Deployed Naval Forces". Commander, Task Force 70. U.S. Seventh Fleet. 2010. Retrieved 1 December 2010.
  25. ^ "COMCARSTRKGRU EIGHT". Home Page. U.S. Navy. 2010. Archived from the original on 25 September 2012. Retrieved 1 December 2010.
  26. ^ Senior Chief Journalist (SW/AW) Priscilla Kirsh, U.S.N (18 November 2005). "Strike Group Staff Moves Aboard Ike". NNS051118-12. USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Public Affairs. Archived from the original on 19 December 2012. Retrieved 13 December 2010.
  27. ^ This story was written Mass Communication Specialist Seaman A.O. Tinubu, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs. "USS Harry S. Truman Deploys".
  28. ^ "COMCARSTRKGRU NINE". Home Page. U.S. Navy. 2010. Retrieved 1 December 2010.
  29. ^ "Commander, Carrier Strike Group Ten". Home Page. U.S. Navy. 2010. Archived from the original on 14 March 2011. Retrieved 2010-12-01.
  30. ^ Journalist 1st Class (SW) Athena Blain, U.S.N (11 April 2005). "CSG 10 Changes Command". NNS050411-06. USS Harry S. Truman Strike Group Public Affairs. Retrieved 13 December 2010.
  31. ^ "COMCARSTRKGRU ELEVEN". Home Page. U.S. Navy. 2010. Retrieved 1 December 2010.
  32. ^ "COMCARSTRKGRU TWELVE". Home Page. U.S. Navy. 2010. Retrieved 1 December 2010.
  33. ^ "CSG 12 Enterprise Strike Group". Home Page. U.S. Navy. 2010. Archived from the original on 21 December 2010. Retrieved 2010-12-01.
  34. ^ Journalist 3rd Class Daniel Vaughan, U.S.N (7 September 2004). "Cruiser Destroyer Group 8 Takes Charge of Enterprise CSG". NNS040907-04. USS Enterprise Public Affairs. Retrieved 20 April 2009.
  35. ^ Journalist Seaman N.C. Kaylor, U.S.N (6 June 2006). "Enterprise Strike Group Begins Operations in Persian Gulf". NNS060606-03. USS Enterprise Public Affairs. Retrieved 20 April 2009.
  36. ^ Carlo Munoz (5 August 2011). "Navy Drops Carrier Group, Down to Nine". Sea. AOL Defense. Archived from the original on 12 October 2011. Retrieved 9 September 2011.
  37. ^ "Deactivation of Carrier Strike Group Seven and Change in Permanent Duty Station for Carrier Strike Group Eleven" (PDF). OPNAV Notice 5400 Ser DNS-33/11U107438 of 1 Mar 2011. =Office of the Chief of Naval OperationsU.S. Department of the Navy. 10 May 2011. Retrieved 29 September 2011.
  38. ^ "Commander Carrier Strike Group Seven". Official Web Site. U.S. Navy. 2010. Retrieved 1 December 2010.
  39. ^ Chief Journalist Donnie Ryan and Photographer's Mate 2nd Class (AW) Anthony Walker (25 October 2005). "USS Ronald Reagan, Carrier Strike Group 7 Begin COMPTUEX". NNS051024-12. USS Ronald Reagan Public Affairs. Retrieved 13 December 2010.
  40. ^ "COMCARSTRKGRU FOURTEEN". Home Page. U.S. Navy. 2010. Retrieved 1 December 2010.

Further reading

Carrier Air Wing One

Carrier Air Wing One (CVW-1) is a United States Navy aircraft carrier air wing based at Naval Air Station Oceana, Virginia, with most of its various squadrons also home based at NAS Oceana. Additional squadrons are based at Naval Station Norfolk/Chambers Field, Virginia; Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, South Carolina; Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington; and Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Florida.

Carrier Air Wing One is assigned to USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75).

Carrier Strike Group 1

Carrier Strike Group One (CSG-1 or CARSTRKGRU 1) is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group. USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) is the strike group's current flagship, and other units currently assigned are the ship’s Carrier Air Wing 2 and embarked Destroyer Squadron 1, deployed with Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Lake Champlain, as well as Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Michael Murphy and USS Wayne E. Meyer.

Although the previous Carrier Strike Group One traced its history to Carrier Division 1, formed in 1930, the current Carrier Strike Group One was an entirely new naval formation when it was established in October 2009. During the relocation of its flagship Carl Vinson to its new home base in San Diego, California, it supported Operation Unified Response, providing humanitarian assistance following the 2010 Haiti earthquake. During its first overseas deployment in 2011, the body of Osama bin Laden was flown to the Carl Vinson for burial at sea. Carrier Strike Group One was the second U.S. Navy carrier force to participate in Operation Inherent Resolve.

Carrier Strike Group 10

Carrier Strike Group 10, abbreviated as CSG-10 or CARSTRKGRU 10, is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group. Carrier strike groups gain and maintain sea control as well as project naval airpower ashore.The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) is the strike group's current flagship, and as of 2015, other units assigned to the group include Carrier Air Wing Three embarked on board Eisenhower, the Ticonderoga-class cruiser San Jacinto, and Destroyer Squadron 26.Through Cruiser-Destroyer Group 2 and Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla 2, the group traces its history to the formation of Destroyer Flotilla 2 during the First World War. From the 1970s, the group has made scores of deployments to the Mediterranean and Middle East, usually led by a large-deck aircraft carrier. Between 2004 and 2014, the group made four deployments to the U.S. Fifth Fleet operating in the Persian Gulf and North Arabian Sea. The group's aircraft flew over 10,800 air combat missions in support of coalition ground forces in Iraq and Afghanistan. The group's surface warships were also involved in several high-profile anti-piracy and maritime security operations. The group participated in two major multi-lateral exercises, Operation Brewing Storm 2005 and Operation Bold Step 2007.

Carrier Strike Group 11

Carrier Strike Group 11 (CSG-11 or CARSTRKGRU 11) is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group. Carrier strike groups gain and maintain sea control as well as project naval airpower ashore.The aircraft carrier Nimitz is the strike group's current flagship. Other units currently assigned to the group include the cruisers Lake Erie and Princeton, and Destroyer Squadron 9.Between 2006 and 2013, the group made four deployments to the U.S. Fifth Fleet operating in the Persian Gulf and North Arabian Sea, as well as a surge deployment with the U.S. Seventh Fleet in the western Pacific Ocean. The group participated in bilateral exercises Malabar 2005 and Malabar 2005, Key Resolve/Foal Eagle 2008, as well as joint exercise Valiant Shield 2007.

Carrier Strike Group 12

Carrier Strike Group Twelve (CSG-12 or CARSTRKGRU 12) is one of four U.S. Navy carrier strike groups currently assigned to the United States Fleet Forces Command. Carrier strike groups gain and maintain sea control as well as project naval airpower ashore.The USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is the aircraft carrier assigned as the strike group's flagship. Units currently assigned to Carrier Strike Group Twelve included Carrier Air Wing One; the Ticonderoga-class cruisers Vicksburg and Normandy; and Destroyer Squadron 2.

Between 2006 and 2011, with USS Enterprise (CVN-65) as its flagship, the group made four deployments to the U.S. Fifth Fleet in the Middle East. Strike group aircraft flew over 13,000 air combat missions in support of coalition ground forces in Iraq and Afghanistan, including 2006's Operation Medusa and Operation Mountain Fury in Iraq. The group's surface warships were also involved in several high-profile anti-piracy operations. The group participated in the multilateral exercises Anatolian Sun 2006, Reliant Mermaid 2007, BALTOPS 2008, and Malabar 2015; the bilateral exercise Inspired Union 2006; and the joint exercise Exercise Bold Alligator 2012.

The 2015 deployment was led by its new flagship, USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71), which has since left the group and shifted homeport to Naval Base San Diego, California. Carrier Strike Group Twelve was the first U.S. Navy carrier strike group to deploy with a Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air (NIFC-CA) capability that integrates all units via a data link to gain a more comprehensive overview of its operational battlespace. To augment this NIFC-CA capability, the strike group embarked the new E-2D airborne early warning (AEW) aircraft, making its first overseas deployment.

Carrier Strike Group 14

Carrier Strike Group 14 (CSG-14 or CARSTRKGRU 14, sometimes with the "Fourteen" spelled out) was a U.S. Navy carrier strike group. The group was for some time the only U.S. carrier strike group that did not have an assigned aircraft carrier or carrier air wing. As of December 2010, it directed the cruisers USS Gettysburg (CG-64) and USS Philippine Sea (CG-58). Carrier Strike Group 14 was seemingly last based at Naval Station Mayport. Without a carrier flagship, it did not conduct the typical deployments of other carrier strike groups; instead, its two cruisers made independent voyages.

The group is not listed in the Administrative Organisation of the Operating Forces of the United States Navy: Fleet Chain of Command, March 2012, and thus appears to have been disestablished.

Carrier Strike Group 15

Carrier Strike Group 15, (CSG-15 or CARSTRKGRU 15, and sometimes spelled out, viz. "Fifteen") is a training formation of the United States Navy. It trains and certifying Pacific Fleet Carrier Strike Groups, Amphibious Ready Groups, and independently deploying surface ships. It replaced Commander, Strike Force Training Pacific in a title change.

The group was one of fourteen U.S. Navy carrier strike groups established on 1 October 2004. Carrier strike groups are employed in a variety of roles, all of which involve gaining and maintaining sea control.The group was established as Cruiser-Destroyer Group 1 circa 1973. It was redesignated Carrier Strike Group 15 in 2004 but then soon afterwards disbanded. Carrier Strike Group 15 was briefly based at Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia, in 2004, prior to changing its homeport to Naval Air Station North Island, California, in 2005, with the Nimitz class aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) assigned as its flagship. It was then disbanded, but reestablished as a training formation in 2014.

Carrier Strike Group 2

Carrier Strike Group 2 (CSG-2 or CARSTRKGRU 2) is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group, tracing its history originally to 1931. The aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush is the strike group's current flagship. In June 2015, other units assigned to Carrier Strike Group 2 included the nine squadrons of Carrier Air Wing Eight; the Ticonderoga-class cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG-58); and the Arleigh Burke-class destroyers USS Truxtun (DDG-103), USS Roosevelt (DDG-80), and USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) from Destroyer Squadron 22.The group traces its history to the creation of Carrier Division 2 on 1 April 1931. The group took its current form on 1 October 2004. On 29 July 2010, Rear Admiral Nora W. Tyson assumed command of the group, becoming the first woman to command a U.S. Navy carrier task group. The group's 2011 Mediterranean deployment marked the maiden deployment for the carrier USS George H.W. Bush and the guided-missile destroyer Truxtun. The group's units were the first U.S. naval forces to participate in Operation Inherent Resolve, the 2014 U.S.-led multi-lateral air campaign against the Islamic State group.

Carrier Strike Group 3

Carrier Strike Group 3 (CSG-3 or CARSTRKGRU 3) is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group. Carrier strike groups gain and maintain sea control as well as project naval airpower ashore. The aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) is the group's current flagship. Other units assigned include Carrier Air Wing Nine; the Ticonderoga-class cruisers USS Mobile Bay (CG-53) and USS Antietam (CG-54); and the ships of Destroyer Squadron 21.Between 2005 and 2013, the group made five deployments to the U.S. Fifth Fleet supporting U.S. ground forces in Iraq, and Afghanistan. On 18 December 2011, strike group aircraft flew the final carrier-based air mission over Iraq, effectively ending U.S. naval support for Operation New Dawn.

Carrier Strike Group 5

Carrier Strike Group 5, also known as CSG 5 or CARSTRKGRU 5, is the U.S. Navy carrier strike group assigned to the United States Pacific Fleet and permanently forward deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet.

CSG 5 is responsible for unit-level training, integrated training, and material readiness for the group’s ships and aviation squadrons. As the only continuously forward deployed carrier strike group, the CSG-5 staff does not stand down when the strike group is in Yokosuka, but instead continues to maintain command responsibilities over deploying Carrier Strike Groups and independently deployed cruisers, destroyers, and frigates that operate in the Seventh Fleet operating area. The commander and staff are also responsible for the higher level Task Force 70 duties throughout the year in addition to the CSG-5 duties. The composition of the strike group in immediate proximity of the Ronald Reagan varies throughout the year.The CSG 5 Commander also serves as Battle Force Seventh Fleet and Commander, Task Force (CTF 70) for 7th Fleet. In these responsibilities, CSG 5 serves as the Commander of all surface forces (carrier strike groups, independently deploying cruisers, destroyers and frigates) in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. CTF 70 also serves as the Theater Surface Warfare Commander (TSUWC) and Theater Integrated Air Missile Defense Commander (TIAMDC) for Seventh Fleet.

The Strike Group Flagship is the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) which also embarks Strike Warfare Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW 5) and its nine squadrons. As of June 2015, CSG 5 includes three Ticonderoga-class cruisers and Destroyer Squadron Fifteen (CDS 15), which serves as the Sea Combat Commander and is responsible for eight assigned Arleigh Burke-class destroyers.

Ronald Reagan and the ten surface combatant ships operate out of Yokosuka, Japan, while CVW 5 operates out of Atsugi, Japan, when not embarked on Ronald Reagan. Together, these units form the U.S. Navy's only continuously forward deployed (and largest) carrier strike group.

Carrier Strike Group 6

Carrier Strike Group 6 was a United States Navy carrier strike group. Its last homeport was Naval Station Mayport at the mouth of the St. Johns River near Jacksonville, Florida. Fifty-one Rear Admirals served as Commander, Carrier Division/Group/Strike Group 6 from August 1944 until the command was deactivated in April 2007.

Carrier Strike Group 7

Carrier Strike Group Seven (CSG-7 or CARSTRKGRU 7) was a U.S. Navy carrier strike group active from October 2004 until 30 December 2011. The strike group's antecendants included two previous aircraft carrier formations, Carrier Division Seven and Carrier Group Seven. Its heritage thus includes the Second World War, the Vietnam War, and the Cold War, as well as the first and the second Persian Gulf wars, encompassing a total of 34 deployments to the Western Pacific Ocean and Persian Gulf.

Carrier Strike Group 8

Commander, Carrier Strike Group 8, abbreviated as CCSG-8 or COMCARSTRKGRU 8, is one of five U.S. Navy carrier strike groups currently assigned to the United States Fleet Forces Command. Carrier strike groups gain and maintain sea control as well as project naval airpower ashore.As of 2018 the group flagship is the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75). The other units of the group are the guided-missile cruiser USS Hué City (CG-66), Carrier Air Wing One, and the ships of Destroyer Squadron 28.

Carrier Strike Group 9

Carrier Strike Group 9 (CSG-9 or CARSTRKGRU 9) is a U.S. Navy carrier strike group. Carrier strike groups gain and maintain sea control as well as project naval airpower ashore.It is currently assigned to the U.S. Pacific Fleet. The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) is the group's current flagship. Other group units include Carrier Air Wing Seventeen, the Ticonderoga-class cruisers USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) and USS Cape St. George (CG-71), and Destroyer Squadron 23.The strike group traces its history to Cruiser-Destroyer Group 3, created on 30 June 1973 by the re-designation of Cruiser Destroyer Flotilla 11. From 2004 the strike group has made multiple Middle East deployments providing air forces over Afghanistan and Iraq, as well as conducting Maritime Security Operations. The strike group received the Humanitarian Service Medal in recognition of its disaster relief efforts in Indonesia during Operation Unified Assistance in 2004–05.

Commander Strike Force Training Atlantic

Commander, Carrier Strike Group FOUR (CCSG-4 or COMSTRKGRUFOUR) is the U.S. Fleet Forces Command formation charged with training and certifying Atlantic Fleet Carrier Strike Groups, Amphibious Ready Groups, and independently deploying surface ships. Its mission is to "Conduct safe and effective Strike Force Training of the Atlantic Fleet."From 2004 to 2014, The command was known as Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic (CSFTL or COMSTRKFORTRALANT)

Until 2004, The command was known as Carrier Group FOUR/Commander, Carrier Striking Force (CCG-4).

CCSG-4 is a one star command under the three-star Deputy Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and is based at Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia. Tactical Training Group, Atlantic (TTGL) and Expeditionary Warfare Training Group, Atlantic (EWTGL) are subordinate commands. Additionally, Destroyer Squadron 26 and its four ships USS Gonzalez (DDG 66), USS Nicholas (FFG 47), USS McFaul (DDG 74) and USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79) also fall under CSFTL.

Composite Training Unit Exercise

COMPTUEX, or Composite Training Unit Exercise, is a rehearsal each US Navy Carrier Strike Group performs before departing for deployment. Each ship and aircraft in the battle group trains in its specialty; COMPTUEX brings ships together to project force as a battle group. COMPTUEX is an intermediate-level battle group exercise designed to forge together the battle group and its components into a fully functional fighting team. COMPTUEX is a critical part in the pre-deployment training cycle, and a prerequisite for the battle group's Joint Task Force Exercise.

COMPTUEX is normally conducted during a two-week to three-week period six to eight weeks before deployment. Successfully completion of COMTPUEX certifies the carrier and its air wing as qualified for open ocean operations. COMPTUEX consists of an 18-day schedule of event driven exercise which the follows with a three-day Final Battle Problem. It is conducted and directed by the training carrier group commander and the focus is to bring together the carrier and its air wing as a working team that can operate in a combat environment, as well as integrating with other assets of the battle group.

Expeditionary warfare

Expeditionary warfare is the deployment of a state's military to fight abroad, especially away from established bases. Expeditionary forces were in part the antecedent of the modern concept of rapid deployment forces. Traditionally, expeditionary forces were essentially self-sustaining with an organic logistics capability and with a full array of supporting arms.

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72)

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is the fifth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier in the United States Navy. She is the second Navy ship to have been named after the former President Abraham Lincoln. Her home port is Norfolk, Virginia, and she is a member of the United States Atlantic Fleet. She is administratively responsible to Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic, and operationally served as the flagship of Carrier Strike Group Nine and host to Carrier Air Wing Two until 2012. She was returned to the fleet on 12 May 2017, marking the successful completion of her refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH) carried out at Newport News Shipyard. On 5 May 2019 USS Abraham Lincoln was deployed to the Middle East as the flagship for Carrier Strike Group 12 and Carrier Air Wing Seven assigned to her.

USS Nitze

USS Nitze (DDG-94) is an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer. She is the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Paul Nitze, who served as Secretary of the Navy under president Lyndon B. Johnson and as chief arms control adviser in the administration of president Ronald Reagan.

Leadership
Structure
Personnel
and
training
Equipment
History and
traditions
Active, Deployable
Training, Non-deployable
Inactive, Disestablished

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