Carole Ann Ford

Carole Ann Lillian Ford (née Higgins; born 16 June 1940 in Ilford, Essex)[2] is a British actress best known for her roles as Susan Foreman in the BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who, and as Bettina in the 1962 film adaptation of The Day of the Triffids.

Carole Ann Ford
Caroleanneford86
Ford in 1986
Born
Carole Ann Lillian Higgins[1]

16 June 1940 (age 78)
Ilford, Essex, England
NationalityBritish
OccupationActress, voice coach
Years active1948–present
Known forFirst Doctor Who companion
TelevisionDoctor Who (1963–64;
1983, 1993)
Children2

Life and career

Ford has had a long and diverse acting career. Her theatrical work includes many comedies, dramas and musicals, including The Jungle Book, Stranger in the House, Bakerloo to Paradise, The Owl and the Pussycat, The Rumpus, Pride and Prejudice, Inadmissible Evidence, Enrico, Expresso Bongo, Sleeping Beauty, You Never Can Tell, Ned Kelly, Mother, MacBett, The Boy Friend, Have You Seen Manchester and Private Lives.

Her film appearances include Sarah (about the life of French actress Sarah Bernhardt), The Day of the Triffids (1962) as the blind French girl Bettina, Mix Me a Person (1962), The Great St Trinian's Train Robbery (1966), and The Hiding Place (1975). In addition to Doctor Who, her television appearances include Suspense (in the episode "Man on a Bicycle"), Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads? (in the episode "Affairs and Relations"), Public Eye,[3] Emergency Ward 10, Attorney General, Moonstrike, Compact, Probation Officer and Dial M for Murder.

Ford appeared on Juke Box Jury and various quiz shows, and has performed many voice-overs and voice dubs.

Doctor Who

According to the documentary Doctor Who: Origins, an appearance on Z-Cars prompted Ford's screen test for the role of Susan in Doctor Who in 1963. Playing the granddaughter of the Doctor, Ford was one of the three original companions to accompany William Hartnell's incarnation of the Time Lord. According to Ford, Susan was originally intended to be a character similar to those in The Champions, with telepathic abilities as well as the skills to fly the TARDIS, but in the series she was made to be far more ordinary.[4] Her character departed from the series at the conclusion of the 1964 serial The Dalek Invasion of Earth, but returned briefly for both the series's 20th-anniversary TV special, The Five Doctors (1983),[3] and 30th-anniversary charity special, Dimensions in Time (1993). She appeared as a different character in the independent Doctor Who spin-off film Shakedown: Return of the Sontarans (1995).

Ford mostly stopped acting following an illness in 1977 which led to a dramatic weight reduction and the loss of her voice,[4] (it recovered later). Since then, she since taught voice and presentation skills and dialogue coaching to politicians, businesspeople, after-dinner speakers, and actors.[5] Since the 2000s, however, she has made a limited return to the profession, reprising the role of Susan in a number of Doctor Who audio plays by Big Finish Productions (some of which have been broadcast on BBC Radio): two Doctor Who Unbound stories, Auld Mortality and A Storm of Angels; two Companion Chronicles stories, Here There Be Monsters and Quinnis; and three stories also featuring the Doctor, starting with the subscription-only release An Earthly Child, in which her character is re-united with Paul McGann's Eighth Doctor, followed by Relative Dimensions and Lucie Miller. She was played by Claudia Grant in the BBC Two docu-drama An Adventure in Space and Time, which dramatises the story of the conception of Doctor Who and was broadcast on 21 November 2013 to complement the series' 50th-anniversary special.[6] Ford herself appeared in a small role as a character named Joyce.[7]

In November 2013, Ford appeared in the one-off 50th-anniversary comedy homage The Five(ish) Doctors Reboot.[8] Ford also narrated the behind the scenes look at the making of An Adventure In Space And Time, "The Making of Doctor Who". She examines the making of Doctor Who and what it was like to work with William Hartnell (the First Doctor).

Filmography

Film

Year Title Role Notes
1948 The Last Load Unknown
1959 Horrors of the Black Museum Teen in hall of mirrors uncredited
The Ghost Train Murder Jean
1962 Mix Me a Person Jenny
The Day of the Triffids Bettina
1963 The Punch and Judy Man Girl in seaside kiosk
1966 The Great St. Trinian's Train Robbery Albertine
1967 The Man Outside Cindy
1975 The Hiding Place Woman uncredited

Television

Year Title Role Notes
1958 Expresso Bongo Ensemble TV Movie
1959 Probation Officer Susan Portway Season 1, Episode 12
1960 Emergency-Ward 10 Miss Foulkes Season 1, Episode 385
1961 Dixon of Dock Green Helen Layton Season 7, Episode 21: "River Beat"
No Hiding Place Mary Donovon Season 3, Episode 9: "The Toy House"
1962 Crying Down the Lane Jenny Season 1, Episode 1
Z-Cars Rita Season 1, Episode 5: "The Big Catch"
Harpers West One Marilyn Season 2, Episode 5
1963 Suspense Jacky Season 2, Episode 12: "The Man on the Bicycle"
1963–1964 Doctor Who Susan Foreman Season 1: (42 episodes)

Season 2: (9 episodes)

1965 The Plane Makers Wally Griggs Season 1, Episode 15: "One of Those Days"
Public Eye Jenny Graham Episode: The Morning Wasn't So Hot
1974
Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads? Valerie Season 2, Episode 8: "Affairs and Relations"
1983 Doctor Who Susan Foreman Season 20, Episode 23: "The Five Doctors"
1993 Dimensions in Time TV Short
1996 The Time, The Place Herself "Doctor Who"
2013 An Adventure in Space and Time Joyce TV Movie
The Five(ish) Doctors Reboot Herself (fictionalised) TV Movie

Videos

Year Title Role Notes
1994 Shakedown: Return of the Sontarans Zorelle
1999 Soul's Ark Stella Grant
2006 Doctor Who: A Happy Ending Susan Foreman
2012 Doctor Who: Planet of Giants

References

  1. ^ "Entry Info". FreeBMD. Retrieved 6 May 2015.
  2. ^ "Doctor Who Guide". Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  3. ^ a b "Doctor Who companions: Where are they now?".
  4. ^ a b Doctor Who. "'Doctor Who? It destroyed my acting career'". Telegraph. Retrieved 2014-01-09.
  5. ^ Donna White, "A Time Lord of Romance", Sunday Mail (Glasgow, 20 March 2005).
  6. ^ "Jessica Carney Associates". 5 February 2013. Retrieved 6 February 2013.
  7. ^ "1963: Brought Back To Life!". Doctor Who Magazine. Panini Comics (458): 7. April 2013.
  8. ^ "The Five(ish) Doctors Reboot", BBC programmes, retrieved 26 November 2013

External links

An Unearthly Child

An Unearthly Child (sometimes referred to as 100,000 BC) is the first serial of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It was first broadcast on BBC TV in four weekly parts from 23 November to 14 December 1963. Scripted by Australian writer Anthony Coburn, the serial introduces William Hartnell as the First Doctor and his original companions: Carole Ann Ford as the Doctor's granddaughter, Susan Foreman, with Jacqueline Hill and William Russell as school teachers Barbara Wright and Ian Chesterton. The first episode deals with Ian and Barbara's discovery of the Doctor and his time-space ship TARDIS in a junkyard in contemporary London. The remaining episodes are set amid a power struggle between warring Stone Age factions who have lost the secret of making fire.

The show was created to fill a gap between children's and young adult programming. Canadian producer Sydney Newman was tasked with creating the show, with heavy contributions from Donald Wilson and C. E. Webber. Newman conceived the idea of the TARDIS, as well as the central character of the Doctor. Production was led by Verity Lambert, the BBC's first female producer, and the serial was directed by Waris Hussein. Following several delays, the first episode was recorded in September 1963 on 405-line black and white videotape, but was re-recorded the following month due to several technical and performance errors. Several changes were made to the show's costuming, effects, performances, and scripts throughout production.

The show's launch was overshadowed by the assassination of John F. Kennedy the previous day, resulting in a repeat of the first episode the following week. The serial received mixed reviews, and the four episodes attracted an average of six million viewers. Retrospective reviews of the serial are favourable. It later received several print adaptations and home media releases.

Ashby St Mary

Ashby St Mary is a village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The civil parish has an area of 2.03 square kilometres (0.78 sq mi) and in the 2001 census had a population of 297 in 115 households, the population increasing to 316 in 120 households at the 2011 Census. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of South Norfolk.The village is situated 7 1⁄2 miles (12.1 km) south-east of Norwich and 1 mile (1.6 km) north of Thurton, with Claxton (to the north), Hellington (to the west) and Carleton St Peter (to the east) all lying a similar distance away. The church has a high tower, a long, low nave, and an impressive Norman door. A tombstone in the graveyard depicts a lady with geese; this much-photographed carving is repeated on the village sign, which was commissioned in 2000 to celebrate the millennium. It also depicts a windmill which stood in the village until at least 1916.The village was recorded in the Domesday Book. Thomas de Cottingham, a royal clerk who later became Master of the Rolls in Ireland was appointed rector of Ashby in 1349: he was notorious for pluralism.The Church was used in October 2010 by Music composer Jamie Robertson who along with the Poringland Singers Choir recorded an incidental soundtrack to the Big Finish Productions story Doctor Who Relative Dimensions (with Paul McGann, Jake McGann, Carole Ann Ford and Niky Wardley).

Auld Mortality

Auld Mortality is a Big Finish Productions audio drama based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. The Doctor Who Unbound dramas pose a series of "What if...?" questions.

Doctor Who (season 2)

The second season of British science fiction television series Doctor Who began on 31 October 1964 with the story Planet of Giants and ended on 24 July 1965 with The Time Meddler. Only 37 of 39 episodes exist in the BBC archives; 2 remain missing. As a result, 1 serial is incomplete.

Doctor Who (season 20)

The twentieth season of British science fiction television series Doctor Who began on 3 January 1983 with the story Arc of Infinity, and ended 16 March 1983 with The King's Demons. A 20th Anniversary special, The Five Doctors, followed in November 1983.

Domain of the Voord

Domain of the Voord is a Big Finish Productions audio drama based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who and the first to be realised in the Early Adventures series. The story was written by Andrew Smith and starred William Russell and Carole Ann Ford.

First Doctor

The First Doctor is the initial incarnation of the Doctor, the protagonist of the BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who. He was portrayed by the actor William Hartnell.

Within the series' narrative, the Doctor is a centuries-old alien Time Lord from the planet Gallifrey who travels in time and space in his TARDIS, frequently with companions. At the end of life, the Doctor can regenerate his body; as a result, his physical appearance and personality change.

Hartnell's Doctor is the Doctor's "original" form. The rejuvenation, initially referred to as a "renewal," was introduced when Hartnell needed to leave the series, and consequently has extended the life of the show for many years.

His original companions were his granddaughter Susan (Carole Ann Ford) and her schoolteachers Ian Chesterton (William Russell) and Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill).

Hartnell reprised the role once, in the tenth anniversary story The Three Doctors (1973), although due to his failing health the story was written so he would not have to appear very extensively. The character occasionally appeared in the series after Hartnell's death, most prominently in 1983's The Five Doctors where he was portrayed by Richard Hurndall, and two episodes in 2017, "The Doctor Falls" and the Christmas special, "Twice Upon a Time", portrayed by David Bradley.

List of St Trinian's films cast members

A list of actors who have appeared in the St Trinian's School films.

Hermione Baddeley

Dora Bryan

George Cole

Carole Ann Ford

Joyce Grenfell

Irene Handl

Frankie Howerd

Raymond Huntley

Sid James

Peter Jones

John Le Mesurier

Cecil Parker

Beryl Reid

Sabrina (actress)

Terry Scott

Alastair Sim

Joan Sims

Terry-Thomas

Reg Varney

Thorley Walters

Marco Polo (Doctor Who)

Marco Polo is the completely missing fourth serial of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It was first broadcast on BBC TV in seven weekly parts from 22 February to 4 April 1964. It was written by John Lucarotti and directed by Waris Hussein; John Crockett directed the fourth episode. The story is set in China in the year 1289, where the Doctor (William Hartnell), his granddaughter Susan Foreman (Carole Ann Ford), and her teachers Ian Chesterton (William Russell) and Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill) meet the Venetian merchant-explorer Marco Polo (Mark Eden) and Mongolian Emperor Kublai Khan (Martin Miller).

Lucarotti—who had previously written works based on Marco Polo's adventures—was suggested to producers by Doctor Who creator Sydney Newman when the show was early in development. Throughout production, the script was rewritten to make the story more personal to Polo. Barry Newbery, the serial's designer, used several historical books for research of the old designs, taking inspiration from 1900 Korean architecture. The serial premiered with nine million viewers, and maintained audience figures throughout its seven-week run. It received generally positive responses from critics and was sold widely overseas, but was erased by the BBC in 1967; the entire serial is missing as a result. The serial received later print adaptations, and soundtrack releases based on the surviving audio.

Mix Me a Person

Mix Me a Person is a 1962 British crime drama film directed by Leslie Norman, starring Anne Baxter, Donald Sinden, Adam Faith, Walter Brown and Carole Ann Ford. The screenplay concerns a young London criminal who is faced with being hanged for murdering a policeman. With even his defence counsel convinced of his guilt, a female psychiatrist tries to prove that the police and legal system have made a mistake.

Susan Foreman

Susan Foreman is a fictional character in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. The granddaughter and original companion of the First Doctor, she was played by actress Carole Ann Ford from 1963 to 1964, in the show's first season and the first two stories of the second season. Ford reprised the role for the feature-length 20th anniversary episode The Five Doctors (1983) and the 30th anniversary charity special Dimensions in Time (1993).

The Aztecs (Doctor Who)

The Aztecs is the sixth serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on BBC1 in four weekly parts from 23 May to 13 June 1964. It was written by John Lucarotti and directed by John Crockett. In the serial, the First Doctor (William Hartnell), his granddaughter Susan (Carole Ann Ford), and teachers Ian Chesterton (William Russell) and Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill) arrive in Mexico during the Aztec empire. Barbara becomes mistaken for the goddess Yetaxa, and accepts the identity in hope of persuading the Aztecs to give up human sacrifice, despite the Doctor's warnings about changing history.

Lucarotti became fascinated by the Aztec civilisation while living in Mexico, largely due to the Aztec tradition of human sacrifice. He wrote the episodes while his other serial, Marco Polo, was in production. Designer Barry Newbery based his set designs on books and documentaries about the Aztecs, though faced difficulty due to the limited information on the civilisation available. Costume designer Daphne Dare used artistic license with the serial's costumes, due to the limited clothing worn by the Aztecs. The serial premiered with 7.9 million viewers, maintaining audience figures throughout the four weeks. Response for the serial was positive, and it has since been described as one of the show's greatest stories. It later received several print adaptations and home media releases.

The Dalek Invasion of Earth

The Dalek Invasion of Earth is the second serial of the second season in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which originally aired in six weekly parts from 21 November to 26 December 1964. It was the second appearance of the Daleks and thus the first time an enemy re-appeared.

The serial is set on the Earth in the 22nd century, where the Daleks occupy the planet following a meteorite strike and a deadly plague. In the serial, the First Doctor (William Hartnell), his granddaughter Susan Foreman (Carole Ann Ford), and teachers Ian Chesterton (William Russell) and Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill) work with a human resistance group to travel to a Bedfordshire mine to stop the Daleks from mining out the Earth's core as part of their plan to pilot the Earth through space.

This serial marks the final regular appearance of Carole Ann Ford as companion Susan.

The Edge of Destruction

The Edge of Destruction (also referred to as Inside the Spaceship) is the third serial of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It was written by David Whitaker, and first broadcast on BBC TV in two weekly parts on 8 February and 15 February 1964. The first episode was directed by Richard Martin, while Frank Cox directed the second. In the story, the Doctor (William Hartnell), his granddaughter Susan (Carole Ann Ford), and her teachers Ian Chesterton (William Russell) and Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill) are in the Doctor's time and space machine the TARDIS when it appears to be taken over by an outside force. The travellers begin acting strangely and turn against each other.

The serial was commissioned as a "filler", in case the show was not renewed beyond the approved 13 weeks. Whitaker wrote the scripts in two days, based on an idea he had developed during the show's formative weeks; he sought to explore the characters in more depth, as well as the facets of the TARDIS. The serial's original director, Paddy Russell, left the project due to other commitments. The serial premiered with ten million viewers, maintaining the figures from the previous story, and received generally positive responses. The BBC Programme Board voiced concerns regarding a scene in which Susan uses scissors as a weapon, noting that it violated code. The serial received print adaptations, as well as home media releases.

The Keys of Marinus

The Keys of Marinus is the fifth serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on BBC1 in six weekly parts from 11 April to 16 May 1964. Written by Terry Nation and directed by John Gorrie, the serial takes on a "mini-adventures" format, in which the First Doctor (William Hartnell), his granddaughter Susan Foreman (Carole Ann Ford), and her teachers Ian Chesterton (William Russell) and Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill) search for five keys to restore the Conscience of Marinus, a computer which maintains law and order. The group travel to two cities, a jungle, and an icy wasteland in search of the keys.

The Keys of Marinus was written to replace a different script which was deemed problematic. When commissioned to write the script, Nation was intrigued by the idea of the TARDIS crew searching for pieces of a puzzle; he and script editor David Whitaker decided to base the serial around a series of "mini-adventures", each with a different setting and cast. Incidental music was composed by Norman Kay, while Raymond Cusick, Daphne Dare and Jill Summers worked as designers. The serial premiered with nine million viewers, maintaining audience figures for several weeks before seeing a significant drop from the fifth episode. Response for the serial was mixed, and it received several print adaptations and home media releases.

The Reign of Terror (Doctor Who)

The Reign of Terror is the partly missing eighth serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on BBC1 in six weekly parts from 8 August to 12 September 1964. It was written by Dennis Spooner and directed by Henric Hirsch. In the serial, the First Doctor (William Hartnell), his granddaughter Susan (Carole Ann Ford), and teachers Ian Chesterton (William Russell) and Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill) arrive in France during the period of the French Revolution known as the Reign of Terror, where they become involved with prisoners and English spies.

Initially interested in writing a science fiction story, Spooner was asked to write a historical serial by script editor David Whitaker. He eventually decided to focus on the French Revolution, a setting first suggested by Russell. Hirsch underwent great stress during the serial's production; he collapsed during filming of the third episode, and was replaced until the following week. The serial premiered with 6.9 million viewers, maintaining audience figures throughout the six weeks. Response for the serial was mixed, with criticism aimed at the story and historical inaccuracies. Two of the six episodes remain missing after the BBC wiped them from archives. It later received several print adaptations and home media releases, with animated versions of the missing episodes constructed using off-air recordings.

The Sensorites

The Sensorites is the seventh serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. Written by Peter R. Newman and directed by Mervyn Pinfield and Frank Cox, the serial was first broadcast on BBC1 in six weekly parts from 20 June to 1 August 1964. In the serial, the First Doctor (William Hartnell), his granddaughter Susan Foreman (Carole Ann Ford), and her teachers Ian Chesterton (William Russell) and Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill) visit a planet known as the Sense-Sphere to find the cure to a disease afflicting the alien race the Sensorites.

Newman's story for the serial was inspired by 1950s films set during World War II, exploring the notion of soldiers who continued to fight after the war. Pinfield was chosen to direct the first four episodes due to his directing style, while Cox directed the final two episodes. Designer Raymond Cusick avoided the use of right angles in his set designs, recalling Antoni Gaudí's work on the Sagrada Família. The serial premiered with 7.9 million viewers but failed to maintain these figures due to the holiday sports season. Retrospective response for the serial was generally positive, and it later received several print adaptations and home media releases.

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