Carlton, South Yorkshire

Carlton is a village in the Metropolitan Borough of Barnsley in South Yorkshire, England.[1][2] It is situated between the villages of Athersley and Royston. The village is part of the Royston, South Yorkshire ward of the Barnsley MBC. It was built up on coking and coal mining industries and now has one of the largest industrial estates within the surrounding area. In the industrial estate lies a glass recycling plant, called Rexam.

Carlton has two Church of England churches and a Methodist chapel, which is now private housing. A Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses serves both the Carlton and Athersley congregations.

An ancient sacred spring or holy well existed near to the modern-day Carlton Road and became associated with St Helen in early Christian times. The name St Helen's was used for a 20th-century secondary school near to the site of the old well which merged with the original Edward Sheerien School in 1992 (the new Edward Sheerian School merged with Royston High in 2009 to form Carlton Community College). The school is now known as Outwood Academy Carlton, after gaining academy status in 2016 following a report from OFSTED placing the school in special measures.

Carlton has its own village group www.carltonvillage.co.uk[3] that is accessible to all villagers. Carlton has also a junior football team called the Bridge Tigers which has teams ranging from u-7s to u-15s playing at Carlton park.

Carlton
St John the Evangelist - geograph.org.uk - 134657

The church of St John the Evangelist
Carlton is located in South Yorkshire
Carlton
Carlton
Location within South Yorkshire
OS grid referenceSE365102
Metropolitan borough
Metropolitan county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townBARNSLEY
Postcode districtS71
Dialling code01226
PoliceSouth Yorkshire
FireSouth Yorkshire
AmbulanceYorkshire
EU ParliamentYorkshire and the Humber
UK Parliament

References

  1. ^ Ordnance Survey: Landranger map sheet 110 Sheffield & Huddersfield (Glossop & Holmfirth) (Map). Ordnance Survey. 2012. ISBN 9780319231876.
  2. ^ "Ordnance Survey: 1:50,000 Scale Gazetteer" (csv (download)). www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk. Ordnance Survey. 1 January 2016. Retrieved 30 January 2016.
  3. ^ "Carlton Village – Residents Website". www.CarltonVillage.co.uk. Retrieved 18 January 2018.

External links

Media related to Carlton, South Yorkshire at Wikimedia Commons

List of domestic buildings by G. E. Street

G. E. Street (1824–81) was an English architect and architectural writer, whose designs were mainly in High Victorian Gothic style. Born the son of a solicitor, he first worked in a law office, but was then articled to the architect Owen Browne Carter in Winchester. Two years later, in 1844, he moved to London and worked in the office of George Gilbert Scott. Here he also worked with George Frederick Bodley and William White. Street established his own architectural practice in 1849, initially in London, and later in Wantage (then in Berkshire). He was appointed as architect to the diocese of Oxford in 1850, and retained this position until his death. He married in 1852 and in that year moved to Oxford. He returned to London in 1856 and maintained an office there for the remainder of his career. He travelled extensively, visiting the Continent of Europe frequently. Street was also a prolific writer on architectural subjects. He was a member of the Royal Academy, and in 1874 was awarded the Royal Gold Medal of the Royal Institute of British Architects, being its president in 1881.Most of Street's works were in relation to churches; designing new churches, restoring and making additions and alterations to existing churches, and designing fittings and furnishings for them. He also designed domestic buildings, especially vicarages, and schools with houses for the schoolmaster. He designed little in the way of public buildings, although towards the end of his life he designed what has been described as his "greatest commission", the Royal Courts of Justice in London. Most of his works were in England, especially within and close to the diocese of Oxford, but examples of his work can be found throughout England, Wales and Ireland. He also designed some buildings abroad, including a church in Constantinople. Almost all his designs are in Gothic Revival style, in particular, in what is known as the High Victorian style. This style came chronologically after the use of "pure" and "correct" use of features of English Gothic architecture, which had been championed by A. W. N. Pugin and the Ecclesiological Society. High Victorian incorporated the use of polychromy, and elements of Continental forms of Gothic architecture. Street died in 1881, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.This list contains details of Street's work on domestic buildings in England and Scotland.

List of new churches by G. E. Street

G. E. Street (1824–81) was an English architect and architectural writer, whose designs were mainly in High Victorian Gothic style. Born the son of a solicitor, he first worked in a law office, but was then articled to the architect Owen Browne Carter in Winchester. Two years later, in 1844, he moved to London and worked in the office of George Gilbert Scott. Here he also worked with George Frederick Bodley and William White. Street established his own architectural practice in 1849, initially in London, and later in Wantage (then in Berkshire). He was appointed as architect to the diocese of Oxford in 1850, and retained this position until his death. He married in 1852 and in that year moved to Oxford. He returned to London in 1856 and maintained an office there for the remainder of his career. He travelled extensively, visiting the Continent of Europe frequently. Street was also a prolific writer on architectural subjects. He was a member of the Royal Academy, and in 1874 was awarded the Royal Gold Medal of the Royal Institute of British Architects, being its president in 1881.Most of Street's works were in relation to churches; designing new churches, restoring and making additions and alterations to existing churches, and designing fittings and furnishings for them. He also designed domestic buildings, especially vicarages, and schools with houses for the schoolmaster. He designed little in the way of public buildings, although towards the end of his life he designed what has been described as his "greatest commission", the Royal Courts of Justice in London. Most of his works were in England, especially within and close to the diocese of Oxford, but examples of his work can be found throughout England, Wales and Ireland. He also designed some buildings abroad, including a church in Constantinople. Almost all his designs are in Gothic Revival style, in particular, in what is known as the High Victorian style. This style came chronologically after the use of "pure" and "correct" use of features of English Gothic architecture, which had been championed by A. W. N. Pugin and the Ecclesiological Society. High Victorian incorporated the use of polychromy, and elements of Continental forms of Gothic architecture. Street died in 1881, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.This list contains new churches designed by Street and built in England, Scotland and Wales. He also designed churches elsewhere (seven on the Continent, of which three in Switzerland), as well as the Crimea Memorial Church in Istanbul, Turkey, built between 1858 and 1868, and St Paul's American Church in Rome, designed between 1872 and 1876.

Outwood Academy Carlton

Outwood Academy Carlton (formerly Carlton Community College) is a secondary school with academy status located in Carlton, near Barnsley, England. It has a mixed intake of boys and girls ages 11–16 with a comprehensive admissions policy, and in 2016 had an enrolment of 746 pupils.The school serves the communities of Carlton, Athersley and Royston. It has an autistic unit that can accommodate the educational needs of 25 pupils, and a pupil referral unit that can accommodate the educational needs of 10 pupils with behavioural issues.

The school is operated by Outwood Grange Academies Trust and the current principal is Paul Haynes.

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