Carlo Azeglio Ciampi

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi (Italian pronunciation: [ˈkarlo adˈdzeʎʎo ˈtʃampi] (listen); 9 December 1920[2] – 16 September 2016) was an Italian politician and banker. He was the 49th Prime Minister of Italy from 1993 to 1994 and was the tenth President of the Italian Republic from 1999 to 2006.


Carlo Azeglio Ciampi
Ciampi ritratto
10th President of Italy
In office
18 May 1999 – 15 May 2006
Prime MinisterMassimo D'Alema
Giuliano Amato
Silvio Berlusconi
Preceded byOscar Luigi Scalfaro
Succeeded byGiorgio Napolitano
49th Prime Minister of Italy
In office
28 April 1993 – 10 May 1994
PresidentOscar Luigi Scalfaro
Preceded byGiuliano Amato
Succeeded bySilvio Berlusconi
Minister of the Treasury, Budget and
Economic Programming
In office
17 July 1996 – 13 May 1999
Prime MinisterRomano Prodi
Massimo D'Alema
Preceded byLamberto Dini (Treasury)
Mario Arcelli (Budget)
Succeeded byGiuliano Amato
Minister of the Interior
In office
19 April 1994 – 10 May 1994
GovernmentCiampi
Preceded byNicola Mancino
Succeeded byRoberto Maroni
Minister of Tourism and Entertainment
In office
28 April 1993 – 10 May 1994
GovernmentCiampi
Preceded byMargherita Boniver
Succeeded byDomenico Fisichella
Governor of the Bank of Italy
In office
8 October 1979 – 29 April 1993
Preceded byPaolo Baffi
Succeeded byAntonio Fazio
Director General of the Bank of Italy
In office
28 June 1978 – 8 October 1979
Preceded byMario Ercolani
Succeeded byLamberto Dini
Personal details
Born9 December 1920
Livorno, Tuscany, Kingdom of Italy
Died16 September 2016 (aged 95)
Rome, Latium, Italy
NationalityItalian
Political partyPdA (1943–1947)
Independent (1947–2016)[1]
Spouse(s)
Franca Pilla
(m. 1946–2016)
; his death
Children2
Alma materScuola Normale of Pisa
ProfessionEconomist, politician
Signature
Carlo Azeglio Ciampi's signature

Biography

Education

Ciampi was born in Livorno (Province of Livorno).[3]

He received a B.A. in ancient Greek literature and classical philology in 1941 from the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, one of the country's most prestigious universities, defending a thesis entitled Favorino d'Arelate e la consolazione Περὶ φυγῆς[4] under the direction of the Hellenist Augusto Mancini. Then he was called to military duty in Albania as a lieutenant. On 8 September 1943, on the date of the armistice with the Allies, he refused to remain in the Fascist Italian Social Republic, and took refuge in Abruzzo, in Scanno. He subsequently managed to pass the lines and reach Bari, where he joined the Partito d'Azione (and thus the Italian resistance movement).

In 1946 he married Franca Pilla. That same year, he obtained a B.A. in law from the University of Pisa and began working at the Banca d'Italia. He also joined the CGIL (Trade Union), which he left in 1980.

Bank of Italy

In 1960, he was called to work in the central administration of the Bank of Italy, where he became Secretary General in 1973, Vice Director General in 1976, and Director General in 1978. In October 1979, he was nominated Governor of the Bank of Italy and President of the national Bureau de Change, positions he filled until 1993.

Political career

Ciampi was the first non-parliamentarian prime minister of Italy in more than 100 years.[5] From April 1993 to May 1994 he oversaw a technical government. Later, as treasury minister from 1996 to May 1999 in the governments of Romano Prodi and Massimo D'Alema, he was credited with adopting the euro currency. He personally chose the Italian design for the 1-euro coin, whereas all others were left to a television vote among some candidates the ministry had prepared (see also: Italian euro coins).

Ciampi chose the Vitruvian man of Leonardo da Vinci, on the symbolic grounds that it represented man as a measure of all things, and in particular of the coin: in this perspective, money was at the service of man, instead of its opposite. The design also fitted very well on the bimetallic material of the coin.

Presidency and afterward

20050407-2 wf1g6022jas-1-515h
Ciampi meets U.S. President George W. Bush at the Quirinale Palace, April 7, 2005

Ciampi was elected with a broad majority, and was the second president ever to be elected at the first ballot (when there is a requirement of a two-thirds majority) in a joint session of the Chamber of Deputies, the Italian Senate and representatives of the Regions.

He usually refrained from intervening directly into the political debate while serving as President. However, he often addressed general issues, without mentioning their connection to the current political debate, in order to state his opinion without being too intrusive. His interventions have frequently stressed the need for all parties to respect the constitution and observe the proprieties of political debate. He was generally held in high regard by all political forces represented in the parliament. The possibility of persuading Ciampi to stand for a second term as President – the so-called Ciampi-bis – was widely discussed, despite his advancing age, but it was officially dismissed by Ciampi himself on 3 May 2006, just a few days before his mandate expired. Ciampi resigned as President before the swearing-in ceremony of his successor, Giorgio Napolitano.

As President, Ciampi was not considered to be close to the positions of the Vatican and the Catholic Church, in a sort of alternance after the devout Oscar Luigi Scalfaro. He often praised patriotism, not always a common feeling in Italy because of its abuse by the fascist regime.

He died in Rome on 16 September 2016 at the age of 95.[6][7][8]

Awards and honours

As President of the Italian Republic between 18 May 1999 and 15 May 2006, Ciampi held the roles of:

References

  1. ^ Breda, Marzio (15 July 2009). "Pd avvilente ma eviti scissioni. Sì a Bersani, vero rifondatore". Corriere della Sera (in Italian). La mia ultima tessera […] è stata quella del Partito d'azione, e altre non ne ho mai più volute.
  2. ^ East, Roger; Thomas, Richard J. (3 June 2014). "Profiles of People in Power: The World's Government Leaders". Routledge. Retrieved 6 April 2018 – via Google Books.
  3. ^ Page at Senate website (in Italian).
  4. ^ Favorinus of Arles and the Consolation Περὶ φυγῆς, anastatic reprint by the Scuola Normale di Pisa editions, editor Franco Montanari, introduction of Salvatore Settis, ISBN 978-88-7642-411-3.
  5. ^ Wentworth, Richard L. (28 April 1993). "Italy Turns to a Banker to Form Government". The Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved 26 April 2013.
  6. ^ Italy's former President Carlo Azeglio Ciampi dies aged 95 Wall Street Journal
  7. ^ Former Italian President Carlo Azeglio Ciampi dies at 95 The Guardian
  8. ^ "Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, Former Italian Prime Minister, Dies at 95". The New York Times. 16 September 2016. Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  9. ^ Slovak republic website, State honours Archived 13 April 2016 at the Wayback Machine : 1st Class in 2002 (click on "Holders of the Order of the 1st Class White Double Cross" to see the holders' table)
  10. ^ "Semakan Penerima Darjah Kebesaran, Bintang, dan Pingat Persekutuan".
  11. ^ Nomination by Sovereign Ordonnance n° 331 13 December 2005 (French)
Government offices
Preceded by
Mario Ercolani
Deputy Director General of Banca d'Italia
1976–1978
Succeeded by
Alfredo Persiani Acerbo
Preceded by
Mario Ercolani
Director General of Banca d'Italia
1978–1979
Succeeded by
Lamberto Dini
Preceded by
Paolo Baffi
Governor of Banca d'Italia
1979–1993
Succeeded by
Antonio Fazio
Political offices
Preceded by
Margherita Boniver
Minister of Tourism and Entertainment
1993–1994
Succeeded by
Domenico Fisichella
Preceded by
Giuliano Amato
President of the Council of Ministers of Italy
1993–1994
Succeeded by
Silvio Berlusconi
Preceded by
Nicola Mancino
Minister of the Interior, a.i.
1994
Succeeded by
Roberto Maroni
Preceded by
Lamberto Dini
as Minister of the Treasury
Minister of the Treasury, Budget and
Economic Programming

1996–1999
Succeeded by
Giuliano Amato
Preceded by
Mario Arcelli
as Minister of the Budget and
Economic Programming
Preceded by
Oscar Luigi Scalfaro
President of Italy
1999–2006
Succeeded by
Giorgio Napolitano

External links

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi at Find a Grave

1999 Italian presidential election

The 1999 election of the President of the Italian Republic was held on May 13, 1999. As a second-level, indirect election, only Members of Parliament and regional deputies were entitled to vote. Carlo Azeglio Ciampi was elected head of state of the Italian Republic, a role of representation of national unity and guarantee that Italian politics comply with the Constitution, in the framework of a parliamentary system.

On May 13, 1999, the Speaker of the Chamber of Deputies of Italy Luciano Violante, in agreement with Senate Speaker Nicola Mancino, convened the two houses of the Italian Parliament, integrated with a number of representatives appointed by the twenty Italian regions, in a common session in order to commence voting for the election of the new President of the Italian Republic.

According to the Italian Constitution, the election must be held in the form of secret ballot, with the Senators, the Deputies and 58 regional representatives allowed to cast their votes. When the 1999 election was held, the Senate counted 322 members and the Chamber of Deputies counted 630 members; the electors were in total 1010. The election is held in the Palazzo Montecitorio, home of the Chamber of Deputies, with the capacity of the building being expanded for the purpose. The first three ballots require a two-thirds majority of the voters in order to elect a President. The election is conducted by the Speaker of the Chamber of Deputies, who has the authority to proceed to the public counting of the votes. The presidential mandate lasts seven years.

On May 13, Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, was elected on the first ballot with 707 votes. His term officially started with a swearing-in ceremony held on May 18.

1999 in Italy

Events which happened in 1999 in Italy:

1

1999 ICF Canoe Sprint World Championships

1999 IFAF World Cup

1999 in Italian television

E

European Parliament election, 1999 (Italy)

European Parliament election, 1999 (Veneto)

G

1999 Giro d'Italia

1999 Italian Grand Prix

H

1999 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships

I

Italian films of 1999

Incumbents

President: Oscar Luigi Scalfaro (until 15 May), Carlo Azeglio Ciampi (starting 18 May)

Prime Minister: Massimo D'AlemaL

List of Italian films of 1999

S

1999 San Marino Grand Prix

Serie A 1999–2000

Serie B 1998–99

Serie B 1999–2000

1999 Supercoppa Italiana

U

1999 UCI Road World Championships

V

56th Venice International Film Festival

1999 Women's European Volleyball Championship

W

1999 Women's European Water Polo Championship

1999 Men's European Water Polo Championship

19th G7 summit

The 19th G7 Summit was held in Tokyo, Japan, on July 7–9, 1993. The venue for the summit meetings was the State Guesthouse in Tokyo, Japan.The Group of Seven (G7) was an unofficial forum which brought together the heads of the richest industrialized countries: France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada (since 1976) and the President of the European Commission (starting officially in 1981). The summits were not meant to be linked formally with wider international institutions; and in fact, a mild rebellion against the stiff formality of other international meetings was a part of the genesis of cooperation between France's President Giscard d'Estaing and West Germany's Chancellor Helmut Schmidt as they conceived the first Group of Six (G6) summit in 1975.

2002 in Italy

Events which happened in Italy in 2002:

2

2002 in Italian television

8

8th International Architecture Exhibition

C

Cogne homicide

G

2002 Giro d'Italia

I

Italian films of 2002

Incumbents

President: Carlo Azeglio Ciampi

Prime Minister: Silvio BerlusconiL

List of number-one hits of 2002 (Italy)

M

2002 Milan Indoor

2002 Milan–San Remo

2002 Molise earthquake

2002 Italian motorcycle Grand Prix

P

2002 Pirelli Tower plane crash

R

2002 Rome summit

S

2002 San Marino Grand Prix

Serie B 2001–02

Serie B 2002–03

V

59th Venice International Film Festival

W

Italy at the 2002 Winter Olympics

2003 Nasiriyah bombing

The 2003 Nasiriyah bombing was a suicide attack on the Italian military police headquarters in Nasiriyah, Iraq, south of Baghdad on 12 November, 2003. The attack resulted in the deaths of 18 Italian servicemembers, mostly members of the Carabinieri, an Italian civilian, and 9 Iraqi civilians and was the worst Italian military disaster since the Second World War. The attack, labeled a "terrorist act" by Italian president Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, was among a string of many attacks on non-American military international targets in Iraq that occurred shortly after the end of major combat operations, including the Jordanian and Turkish embassies, International Red Cross, and UN facilities.

2006 Italian presidential election

The indirect election of the President of the Italian Republic was held on May 8–10, 2006. As a second-level, indirect election, only Members of Parliament and regional deputies were entitled to vote. Giorgio Napolitano was elected head of state of the Italian Republic, a role of representation of national unity and guarantee that Italian politics comply with the Constitution, in the framework of a parliamentary system.

On May 2, 2006, the Speaker of the Chamber of Deputies of Italy Fausto Bertinotti, in agreement with Senate Speaker Franco Marini, convened the two houses of the Italian Parliament, integrated with a number of representatives appointed by the twenty Italian regions, in a common session on May 8 in order to commence voting for the election of the new President of the Italian Republic.

According to the Italian Constitution, the election must be held in the form of secret ballot, with the Senators, the Deputies and 58 regional representatives allowed to cast their votes. When the 2006 election was held, the Senate counted 322 members and the Chamber of Deputies counted 629 members; the electors were in total 1009. The election is held in the Palazzo Montecitorio, home of the Chamber of Deputies, with the capacity of the building being expanded for the purpose. The first three ballots require a two-thirds majority of the voters in order to elect a President, in this election equivalent to 673 votes. Starting from the fourth ballot, an absolute majority is required for candidates to be elected (in this election, 505 votes). The election is conducted by the Speaker of the Chamber of Deputies, who has the authority to proceed to the public counting of the votes. The presidential mandate lasts seven years.

Outgoing President Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, 85, was asked to run for another mandate by the centre-right House of Freedoms, with the strong support of the centre-left Union. However, Ciampi declined to run again, noting that "none of the past nine presidents of the Republic has been re-elected. I think this has become a meaningful rule. It is better not to infringe it." Ciampi was elected in 1999 at the first ballot, becoming only the second president ever to win on the first ballot, after Francesco Cossiga.

On May 10, Giorgio Napolitano, the candidate endorsed by the Union, was elected on the fourth ballot with 543 votes. His term officially started with a swearing-in ceremony held on May 15.

Augusto Antonio Barbera

Augusto Antonio Barbera (born 25 June 1938) is an Italian judge and former constitutional law professor at the University of Bologna. In his political career he was member of the Chamber of Deputies between 1976 and 1994 for the Italian Communist Party and later the Democratic Party of the Left. In 1993 he served shortly as Minister without portfolio for relations with Parliament in the government of Prime Minister Carlo Azeglio Ciampi. Barbera has been Judge of the Constitutional Court of Italy since 21 December 2015.

Berardo Carboni

Berardo Carboni (born in Atri, 27 January 1975) is an Italian director.

Graduate in jurisprudence, he has a PhD in “civil problems of the human being”. As scriptwriter and director, he has made shorts and documentaries, including Roma in Quel Niente, a documentary about Federico Caffè with Giorgio Ruffolo, Valentino Parlato and Carlo Azeglio Ciampi. Since 2000 he has been working with Lara Favaretto on the making of videos for the art circuit that have been awarded in contexts such as “Furla Prize” “MomaP.S. 1 studio program”. Together with Favaretto, he also worked in 2003 on the TV film Buco Nell'Acqua, a docudrama with Sandra Milo, produced by Kublakhan for Mediatrade.From 2005 until 2008, he produced and directed the project-film Shooting Silvio which was produced by popular subscription. It was selected and awarded at film festivals including Roma, Annecy, Tiburon, Kiev. He won the best director prize at the Gallio Film Festival.

From 2009 until 2010, he worked on “Vola Vola”, an experimental film entirely shot in a virtual reality. After having been presented to Geode of Paris, it was screened at a number of international Festivals and art forums and has been studied by critics and researchers.In 2012 he directed Euros, a feature documentary that tells the story of three activists from the occupied Valle Theatre who decide to leave Rome to travel around the Europe of crisis and resistances. In 2014 he founded the production company "Piroetta". Since 2015, he has also directed and produced, with the company European Alternatives, "Talk Real", a European nomadic talk show for the web. Currently, he is working on “Youtopia”, a feature fiction film with Alessandro Haber, Donatella Finocchiaro and Matilda De Angelis. The film is scheduled for release in spring 2018.

Ermanno Corsi

Ermanno Corsi (born 8 August 1939) is an Italian journalist and writer. He was born in Carrara.

He worked for the newspaper "Il Tempo" and "Il Mattino" and was a correspondent for " Il Giorno ", " Repubblica ", " Roma " and " Il Mondo " and " L'Europeo ", amongst others.

In 1994 he won the Amantea prize for historiography and was rewarded with merit by the then President Carlo Azeglio Ciampi.

He was President of Association of Neapolitan Printing from 1989 to 2007, and an adviser to the Regional Council' s Association of Journalists of Maharashtra.

Ferruccio Mataresi

Ferruccio Mataresi was born in Livorno and began his artistic career in 1940 with the teaching of the painter Eugenio Carraresi it continues the study in the Accademia delle Belle Arti of Florence and it frequents the study of Pietro Annigoni.To Livorno he is the only painter to follow the teachings and the Neoclassic pictorial tide of Pietro Annigoni that it transfers readapting in the century XIX the painting proper of the Renaissance period.

Numerous the portraits by Mataresi by the known of the city of Livorno to the famous historical characters what: Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, Giovanni Paolo II, Padre Lanfranco Serrini and the baritone Danilo Checchi.Some works are located in public collections and deprived by to quote the positions at the Building of the Quirinale, to the center Rai, and to the Domus Pacis, to the Franciscan Museum modern art to Assisi and to the Museum Civic Giovanni Fattori of Livorno.

Bashful artist to lived a solitary life among his few students, to remember the painter Nicola Giusfredi, spending his years in the study of art Scali d'Azeglio to take care of his painting and his pet.

Forever Blues

Forever Blues is a 2005 Italian drama film written, directed and starred by Franco Nero, at his debut as director. It is loosely based on the drama with the same name by Enrico Bernard. At the time of its release the film was openly praised by Italian first lady Franca Ciampi, wife of President of the Italian Republic Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, that defined the film as "educational, emotional, bright and poetic".

Italian Minister of Budget

This is a list of Italian Ministers of Budget, from 1947 to 1997. The first Minister of Budget was Luigi Einaudi, the last one was Carlo Azeglio Ciampi.

Italian euro coins

Italian euro coins have a design unique to each denomination, though there is a common theme of famous Italian works of art from one of Italy's renowned artists. Each coin is designed by a different designer, from the 1 cent to the 2 euro coin they are: Eugenio Driutti, Luciana De Simoni, Ettore Lorenzo Frapiccini, Claudia Momoni, Maria Angela Cassol, Roberto Mauri, Laura Cretara and Maria Carmela Colaneri. All designs feature the 12 stars of the EU, the year of imprint, the overlapping letters "RI" for Repubblica Italiana (Italian Republic) and the letter R for Rome. There are no Italian euro coins dated earlier than 2002, even though they were certainly minted earlier, as they were first distributed to the public in December 2001.

The choice of the design of the coins was left to the Italian public by means of a television broadcast where alternative designs were presented, letting the people vote by calling a certain telephone number. However, the 1 euro coin was missing in this election, because Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, the then economy minister, had already decided it would sport the Vitruvian man of Leonardo da Vinci. Leonardo's work is highly symbolical as it represents the Renaissance focus on man as the measure of all things, and has simultaneously a round shape that fits the coin perfectly. As Ciampi observed, this represents the "coin to the service of Man", instead of Man to the service of money.

Kore University of Enna

The Kore University of Enna, in Italian Università Kore di Enna, is a university founded in 2004 in Enna, the capital city of the Province of Enna, in the center of Sicily and has been visited by two Italian Presidents (Oscar Luigi Scalfaro before, and Carlo Azeglio Ciampi for the final inauguration). The university has very modern facilities; it also has a strong relationships with governments and universities of the Mediterranean Sea countries (Malta, Cyprus, Tunisia) and with some of European and U.S. areas.

The President of the University and the President of the University Foundation is Cataldo Salerno, a Sicilian professor who is also the President of the Province of Enna.

The university has laboratories, auditoriums and a conference and concert hall where important musicians play; other Kore facilities include a sports centre and a residential building for students. Kore is planned to be a large campus in the American style with two Student Houses and many facilities for students. The international relationship of Kore University involves many countries of the Mediterranean Area (Tunisia, Malta, Cyprus, Morocco, etc.) and also American, European and Asian universities. The Kore University of Enna is the newest Sicilian university: in fact, it's the first university founded in Sicily after the unification of Italy, and it was founded 200 years after the foundation of the last Sicilian university, the University of Palermo.

List of Senators for life in Italy

The President of the Italian Republic has the right to appoint five citizens senators for life "for outstanding patriotic merits in the social, scientific, artistic or literary field". Former Presidents are ex officio senators with life tenure.

Current senators are in bold.

Maria Pia Garavaglia

Maria Pia Garavaglia (born 10 August 1947 in Cuggiono) is an Italian politician, former Italian Minister of Health during the Carlo Azeglio Ciampi government and former Deputy Mayor of Rome. She was member of Democrazia Cristiana, then of Italian People's Party and Democracy is Freedom – Daisy. She was extraordinary commissioner and later President of Italian Red Cross. She is director for international programs of the Italy-USA Foundation.

Permanent Representative of Italy to the United Nations

Permanent Representatives of Italy to the United Nations from October 1, 1947

Pietro Micheletti

Pietro Micheletti (19 October 1900 – 25 March 2005) was an Italian military commander.

He was born in Pennabilli, the second of three brothers, into a family in Marche who had moved to Pennabilli in 1500 from Trapani, Sicily,

In the aftermath of the military defeats suffered by the Italian Army in 1917, he volunteered for the frontline, and was sent into battle on 15 June 1918 in the elite troop of 'Arditi' at the Battle of the Piave River. Awarded medals for bravery for the deeds he performed during some fierce battles towards the end of the war, he followed his battalion commander at the War Office, where he held executive positions at the Department of Defence. In December 1919, he was a member of the military commission which negotiated the surrender of the breakaway city of Fiume by Gabriele D'Annunzio.

In 1958 the Italian President appointed him Knight of the Order of Vittorio Veneto; in October 2000 the Council of the Marche Region, to celebrate its one hundred years anniversary, awarded him the Cross of the Council of the Marche Region.

On 29 November 2003 the City of Pennabilli, because of services rendered to the nation during the First World War, presented him with the keys of the City, an honour previously awarded only to the Dalai Lama. In April 2004 the Governor of the Province of Pesaro and Urbino, listed him among those who paid tribute to the land of Pesaro and Urbino and presented him with a province of Apifarfalle.

On 2 June 2005 President Carlo Azeglio Ciampi: "noted the heroic deeds performed by Cav. Pietro Micheletti during the First World War and his meritorious work in the interest of the Nation" and welcomed the request made by the Prime Minister, Cav. Silvio Berlusconi, to appoint him a Knight of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic.

He died on 25 March 2005 at the age of 104.

Simonetta Di Pippo

Simonetta Di Pippo (Rome, born in 1959) is an Italian astrophysicist and the current Director of the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA).

Ms. Di Pippo has a long and successful career dealing in aerospace affairs for more than 30 years. For her work, she has been knighted by the President of the Italian Republic Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, in 2006. In addition, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) named asteroid 21887 "dipippo" as a recognition of her contribution to space exploration.

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