Carl Pickens

Carl McNally Pickens (born March 23, 1970) is a former American football wide receiver who played in the National Football League (NFL) for the Cincinnati Bengals and Tennessee Titans.

Carl Pickens
No. 80, 81, 86
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:March 23, 1970 (age 49)
Murphy, North Carolina
Career information
High school:Murphy (NC)
College:Tennessee
NFL Draft:1992 / Round: 2 / Pick: 31
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:540
Receiving Yards:7,129
Touchdowns:63
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early life

Pickens attended Murphy High School in Murphy, North Carolina, a small town in the Smoky Mountains about 100 miles from Knoxville, Tennessee. He played free safety and wide receiver there, intercepting 15 passes in three seasons and catching 71 passes, including 24 for touchdowns, as a senior, when he was a Parade magazine All-American. He also returned punts and kickoffs, and punted. He also excelled at basketball, averaging 27 points per game and attracting the interest of many college programs.[1]

College career

Pickens played college football for the University of Tennessee from 1989–1991, where he started his career as a safety and was named a Freshman All-American and All-SEC selection. He then moved to wide receiver, where he caught 109 passes for 1,875 yards and 13 touchdowns, and made the College Football All-America Team as a junior. He did not return to Tennessee for his senior year. His college receiving statistics were:

  • 1989: 7 catches for 81 yards with 2 TD
  • 1990: 53 catches for 917 yards with 6 TD
  • 1991: 49 catches for 877 yards with 5 TD

Professional career

Cincinnati Bengals

Pickens was selected in the second round (31st overall) of the 1992 NFL Draft by the Cincinnati Bengals.[2]

In 1992, he was named the NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year by the Associated Press. In 1995, he set a Bengals record for receptions in a single season with 99, and touchdown catches with 17. He later surpassed his own record by recording 100 receptions in 1996. From 1994-1995, Pickens became the first NFL player to record at least five receptions and a receiving touchdown in eight straight games.[3] In his nine NFL seasons, Pickens recorded 540 receptions for 7,129 yards and 63 touchdowns, while also gaining another 307 yards and one touchdown on punt returns. His 63 touchdown receptions were a franchise record until surpassed by Chad Johnson in 2010.[2]

He is also known for the "Carl Pickens Clause". This was a loyalty clause that the Bengals created and added to Pickens's contract which would cause him to forfeit all or some of his signing bonus if he insulted the organization in public. This clause has since been used in contracts with other players.

Dallas Cowboys

On April 5, 2001, Pickens signed as a free agent with the Dallas Cowboys.[4] He announced his retirement on May 30.[5]

Personal life

Pickens was arrested January 5, 2014 for allegedly assaulting his wife after the two argued on a movie date.[6]

References

  1. ^ "Pickens Didn't Exactly Volunteer to Go Both Ways, but . . . : Cotton Bowl: Tennessee needed help in secondary, so it turned to backup wide receiver". Articles.latimes.com. December 29, 1989. Retrieved September 20, 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Carl Pickens Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com. January 1, 1970. Retrieved September 20, 2018.
  3. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/play-index/player_streak_finder.cgi?request=1&match=games&year_min=1920&year_max=2018&game_type=R&streak_event=rec&streak_event_gtlt=gt&streak_num=5&streak_event_2=rec_td&streak_event_gtlt_2=gt&streak_num_2=1&streak_length=2
  4. ^ "TRANSACTIONS". The New York Times. April 6, 2001. Retrieved September 20, 2018.
  5. ^ "TRANSACTIONS". The New York Times. May 31, 2001. Retrieved September 20, 2018.
  6. ^ 1 (January 7, 2014). "Ex-NFL Star Carl Pickens Arrested - Allegedly Attacked Wife After Movie Date Gone Wrong". TMZ.com. Retrieved September 20, 2018.
1990 All-SEC football team

The 1990 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1990 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Florida Gators posted the best conference record, but were ineligible for an SEC title due to NCAA probation. Thus the Tennessee Volunteers won the conference. Florida quarterback Shane Matthews was voted SEC Player of the Year.

1990 Cotton Bowl Classic

The 1990 Cotton Bowl Classic featured the Tennessee Volunteers and the Arkansas Razorbacks.

1991 All-SEC football team

The 1991 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1991 college football season.

The Florida Gators won the conference, posting an undefeated conference record. Florida quarterback Shane Matthews repeated as SEC Player of the Year.

1991 Tennessee Volunteers football team

The 1991 Tennessee Volunteers football team represented the University of Tennessee in the 1991 NCAA Division I-A football season. Playing as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), the team was led by head coach Johnny Majors, in his 15th year, and played their home games at Neyland Stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee. They finished the season with a record of nine wins and three losses (9–3 overall, 5–2 in the SEC) and with a loss against Penn State in the Fiesta Bowl. The Volunteers offense scored 352 points while the defense allowed 263 points.

1992 Cincinnati Bengals season

The 1992 Cincinnati Bengals season was the team's 25th year in professional football and its 23rd with the National Football League (NFL). They finished the year with five wins and 11 losses, and did not qualify for the playoffs. The Bengals, who were then owned by Mike Brown, the son of coach Paul Brown, now turned to the son of another coach to lead the team on the field when he hired assistant Dave Shula to assume the head coaching reins. The Bengals selected University of Houston quarterback David Klingler in the first round of the 1992 NFL Draft. The younger Shula got off to a good start as the Bengals won their first two games, but then lost its next five games, on the way to a five-win season. Wide receiver Carl Pickens, a second-round selection out of the University of Tennessee, earned Offensive Rookie of the Year honors. Following the season, perennial all-pro offensive tackle Anthony Muñoz retired, as the Bengals moved in a new direction by trading quarterback Boomer Esiason to the New York Jets.

1993 Cincinnati Bengals season

The 1993 Cincinnati Bengals season was the team's 26th year in professional football and its 24th with the National Football League. The David Klingler experiment at starting Quarterback got off to a quick start, as the Bengals lost their first ten games for the second of three 0–8 starts in four seasons.

The Bengals would finally get their first win against the Los Angeles Raiders 16–10, at Riverfront Stadium, but were the last winless team for the first of two consecutive years. This ignominy would not be suffered subsequently by any NFL franchise until division rivals the Cleveland Browns went 1–31 in 2016 and 2017. After dropping their next two games, the Bengals closed the season by winning twice before losing their closer to a disappointing Saints outfit to finish with their second 3–13 season in three years.

1994 Cincinnati Bengals season

The 1994 Cincinnati Bengals season was the team's 27th year in professional football and its 25th with the National Football League.

On October 2 history was made at Riverfront Stadium, when Dave Shula and the Bengals faced father Don Shula's Miami Dolphins in the first father-son coaching match up in NFL history. The elder Shula would emerge victorious 23–7, as the Bengals were in the midst of a 0–8 start for the third time in four years.

The Bengals would go on to complete another miserable 3–13 season (their third in four years), as Jeff Blake become the new Quarterback of the future, bringing the David Klingler era to a crashing end.

1995 All-Pro Team

The 1995 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1995. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1995 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice which continued through 2008. In 1995 all three All-pro teams returned to a 4-3 defense, picking only one middle linebacker.

1995 Cincinnati Bengals season

The 1995 Cincinnati Bengals season was the team's 28th year in professional football and its 26th with the National Football League.

With Jeff Blake firmly entrenched as the starting quarterback, the Bengals won their first two games. However, the Bengals would lose their next two, heading into a rematch with Don Shula and the Miami Dolphins, in which the Bengals also lost, 26–23. The Bengals went on to play fairly well the rest of the season, but could not avoid their fifth straight losing season, ending with a 7–9 win-loss record.

One of the season’s biggest disappointments was running back Ki-Jana Carter who the Bengals took with first overall pick out of Penn State. Carter would suffer a knee injury in training camp forcing him to miss his entire rookie season. He would never fully recover, in an injury plagued career.

1996 All-Pro Team

The 1996 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1996. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1996 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008. In 1996 the AP added a new position, that of "Fullback", a primarily blocking position.

1996 Cincinnati Bengals season

The 1996 Cincinnati Bengals season was the team's 29th year in professional football and its 27th with the National Football League. The Dave Shula era comes to a sudden end when he is fired after a 1–6 start, as Jeff Blake struggles with turnovers. Former Bengals TE Bruce Coslet, former New York Jets head coach, and the team's offensive coordinator, would replace Shula as head coach. The move paid off right away as the Bengals won the first 3 games under Coslet. After losing two of their next three games, the Bengals closed the year with three straight wins to finish with an 8–8 record. One bright spot during the season, was that WR Carl Pickens became the first member of the Bengals to have 100 receptions in a season.

1996 Pro Bowl

The 1996 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 1995 season. The game was played on February 4, 1996, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was NFC 20, AFC 13. Jerry Rice of the San Francisco 49ers was named the game's Most Valuable Player after he had 2 clutch catches, including the final one which won the game. He finished with six catches for 82 yards.

The attendance for the game was 50,034. The coaches were Mike Holmgren of the Green Bay Packers and Ted Marchibroda of the Indianapolis Colts. The referee was Tom White.

1997 Pro Bowl

The 1997 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 1996 season. The game was played on February 2, 1997, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was AFC 26, NFC 23. Mark Brunell of the Jacksonville Jaguars was the game's MVP. In the game, Brunell threw for 236 yards. He connected with the Oakland Raiders Tim Brown for an 80-yard touchdown to tie the game at 23 with only 44 seconds to go.

The referee was Larry Nemmers.

To date, this is the most recent Pro Bowl that went to overtime.

1998 Cincinnati Bengals season

The 1998 Cincinnati Bengals season was the team's 31st year in professional football and its 29th with the National Football League. The Bengals suffer another miserable 3–13 season again as new free agent QB Neil O'Donnell, is sacked 30 times. Despite the poor showing by the offensive line, running back Corey Dillon establishes himself as one of the NFL's premier running backs, as he rushes for 1,120 yard. The only bright spot for the Bengals in 1998 was when they swept division rival Pittsburgh. This would be the Bengals only sweep of the Steelers during the “Bungles” years.

Bengalized

Bengalized is a term with origins among Cincinnati Bengals football fans and/or players. It usually refers to a Cincinnati Bengals player who, after multiple seasons of poor team performance, develops hostility with the coaching staff or ownership operation, and cultivates pessimism about remaining with the team. This results in efforts by the player to prompt a trade or release from the team. Bengalized can also refer to a Cincinnati Bengals fan who becomes frustrated after years of futility in losing seasons and/or playoff losses, ultimately ending their support of the franchise. As of the conclusion of the 2017-18 season, the Bengals have had 27 seasons without a playoff win - currently the longest streak in the NFL.Bengalized may also refer to a newly acquired Bengals player or draftee who, upon recognition of high talent and ability, becomes injured (or performs poorly) while playing for the Bengals, which essentially ruins a favorable NFL career.

The specific origin of the term is unknown, but may have roots in promising former Bengals quarterback Greg Cook who was a first round selection by the Bengals in the 1969 NFL draft. After posting outstanding numbers in the first three games of the 1969 season, a shoulder injury in his third game from a hit to his throwing arm effectively ended his NFL career.Multiple other Cincinnati Bengals players who may also be known for becoming Bengalized are David Klingler, Akili Smith, Ki-Jana Carter, Carl Pickens, Dan Wilkinson, Chris Perry, Levi Jones, Corey Dillon, Chad Johnson, and Carson Palmer.

Mike Brown (American football executive)

Michael Brown (born August 10, 1935) is an American football executive and the owner of the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League (NFL), a position he has held since 1991. The son of Bengals co-founder and original coach of the Cleveland Browns, Paul Brown, he joined the Bengals upon their founding in 1968 and assumed ownership of the team after his father's death.

Brown's ownership has been criticized for a lack of on-field success, his refusal to cede football operations to a general manager, and the team's relationship with Hamilton County before and after a voter-approved tax increase to fund Paul Brown Stadium.

Mr. Football USA

Mr. Football USA also known as ESPN RISE National Player of the Year, formerly EA Sports Mr. Football USA, is an award presented to the United States high school football National Player of the year by ESPN HS. In 2013, the award was given by the StudentSports.com.2013 - Will Grier, Davidson (North Carolina) QB

2012 - Max Browne, Skyline (Washington) QB

2011 – Johnathan Gray, Aledo (Texas) RB

2010 – Johnathan Gray, Aledo (Texas) RB (Jr.)

2009 – Dillon Baxter, Mission Bay (San Diego) QB-RB

2008 – Garrett Gilbert, Lake Travis (Austin, Texas) QB

2007 – Jacory Harris, Northwestern (Miami) QB

2006 – Darren Evans, Warren Central (Indianapolis) FB

2005 – Matthew Stafford, Highland Park (Dallas) QB

2004 – Chase Daniel, Carroll (Southlake, Texas) QB

2003 – Jeff Byers, Loveland (Loveland, Colo.) OL-DL

2002 – Chris Leak, Independence (Charlotte, N.C.) QB

2001 – Vince Young, Madison (Houston) QB

2000 – Cedric Benson, Robert E. Lee (Midland, Texas) RB

1999 – D. J. Williams, De La Salle (Concord, Calif.) RB-LB

1998 – J. R. House, Nitro (Nitro, W. Va.) QB

1997 – Ronald Curry, Hampton (Va.) QB-RB

1996 – Travis Henry, Frostproof (Fla.) RB

1995 – Tim Couch, Leslie County (Hyden, Ky.) QB

1994 – Chris Redman, Male (Louisville, Ky.) QB

1993 – Peyton Manning, Newman (New Orleans) QB

1992 – James Allen, Wynnewood (Okla.) RB

1991 – Steven Davis, Spartanburg (S.C.) RB

1990 – Derrick Brooks, Washington (Pensacola, Fla.) LB

1989 – Robert Smith, Euclid (Ohio) RB

1988 – Terry Kirby, Tabb (Va.) RB

1987 – Carl Pickens, Murphy (N.C.) WR

1986 – Emmitt Smith, Escambia (Pensacola, Fla.) RB

1985 – Jeff George, Warren Central (Indianapolis) QB

1984 – Andre Rison, Northwestern (Flint, Mich.) WR-DB

1983 – Chris Spielman, Washington (Massillon, Ohio) LB

1982 – Rod Woodson, Snider (Fort Wayne, Ind.) WR-DB

1981 – Marcus Dupree, Philadelphia (Miss.) RB

1980 – Bill Fralic, Penn Hills (Pittsburgh) OL

1979 – Herschel Walker, Johnson County (Wrightsville, Ga.) RB

1978 – Eric Dickerson, Sealy (Sealy) RB

1977 – Marcus Allen, Lincoln (San Diego) QB-RB

1976 – Freeman McNeil, Banning (Wilmington, Calif.) RB

1975 – Charles White, San Fernando (San Fernando, Calif.) RB

1974 – Billy Sims, Hooks (Hooks, Texas) RB

1973 – Earl Campbell, John Tyler (Tyler, Texas) RB

1972 – Tony Dorsett, Hopewell (Aliquippa, Pa.) RB

1971 – Dave Logan, Wheat Ridge (Wheat Ridge, Colo.) WR

1970 – Pat Haden, Bishop Amat (La Puente, Calif.) QB

Murphy High School (North Carolina)

Murphy High School (MHS) in Murphy, North Carolina, serves grades 9-12 and is one of only three high schools in the Cherokee County Schools. As of 2007 it had an active enrollment of 519 students and a full-time teaching staff of 42 teachers giving an average of 12 students per teacher. It has a GreatSchools rating of 5/10 and an average community rating of 4/5 stars.

Tennessee Volunteers football statistical leaders

The Tennessee Volunteers football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Tennessee Volunteers football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Volunteers represent University of Tennessee in the NCAA's Southeastern Conference.

Although Tennessee began competing in intercollegiate football in 1891, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1930s or 1940s, depending on the particular statistic. Records from before this time period are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1940, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Volunteers have played in 10 bowl games since then, allowing players in those seasons an extra game to accumulate statistics. Similarly, the Volunteers have played in the SEC Championship Game five times since it was first played in 1992.These stats are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

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