Carl Eller

Carl Eller (born January 25, 1942) is a former professional American football player in the National Football League (NFL) who played from 1964 through 1979. He was born in Winston-Salem, North Carolina and attended the University of Minnesota. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2004.

Carl Eller
Carl Eller 2007
No. 81, 71
Position:Defensive end
Personal information
Born:January 25, 1942 (age 77)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Height:6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Weight:247 lb (112 kg)
Career information
High school:Winston-Salem (NC) Atkins
College:Minnesota
NFL Draft:1964 / Round: 1 / Pick: 6
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games:225
Player stats at NFL.com

College career

As a sophomore, Carl Eller helped lead the Gophers to a Rose Bowl victory. While Eller shared the starting position as a sophomore, he became a full-time, two-way player as a junior and senior and was voted All-America both years. During his time in college, the Gophers were National Champions as well as Big Ten champions. As a senior (1963), Eller was the runner-up for the Outland Trophy. Following each football season, the Carl Eller Award is given to the University of Minnesota's Defensive Player of the Year. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2006.[1]

At the University of Minnesota, Eller joined Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity, via the Mu Chapter while at the University of Minnesota.[2] In 1994, he graduated from Metropolitan State University in St. Paul, Minnesota with a bachelor's degree in human services.

NFL career

In 1964, Eller was drafted in the first round of the NFL draft by the Minnesota Vikings. He was also drafted in the first round of the American Football League Draft by the Buffalo Bills, who could not sign him. As the left defensive end in the Vikings front four, he was a major factor in the unit known as the "Purple People Eaters".

Starting in 1968, Eller's fifth campaign, Minnesota won 10 Central Division titles in the next 11 seasons. The Vikings won the NFL Championship in 1969 [3], losing to the AFL Champion Kansas Chiefs in Super Bowl IV and won the NFC Championships in 1973, 1974, and 1976. Eller was one of 11 Vikings to play in all four of their Super Bowls.

He was selected to play in six Pro Bowls (1968–1971, 1973, and 1974). After being traded with an eighth round pick to Seattle Seahawks for defensive tackle Steve Niehaus, Eller played his final season in 1979 with the Seattle Seahawks, where he ran his career total to 225 games. In his career, "Moose" only missed three games and started 209 out of the 225 he played.

Eller is credited as the Vikings all-time sack leader with 130½.[4] He also had 3 sacks with Seahawks in 1979 for a career total of 133½. He set career-high 15 sacks in 1969 and then matched that total in 1977, also to his credit 7 seasons with 10 or more sacks.[5]

Eller was First-team All-NFL from 1968–71, and again in 1973. He was also Second-team All-Pro in 1967 and 1972 and was All-NFC by AP and The Sporting News in 1975. Matched with his Pro Bowls, Eller had a nine-year consecutive streak with some sort of post-season honor which began in 1967 with his Second-team All-pro selection and ended in 1975 with his All-NFC honors.

He was voted the George S. Halas Trophy in 1971 as the NFL's Defensive Player of the Year as awarded by the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA).[6]

Life after football

As a licensed drug and alcohol counselor, Eller founded a group of substance-abuse clinics in the Twin Cities called Triumph Life Centers in 1986. He obtained a college degree in Human Services from Metropolitan State University in 1994 and went on to work for the Minnesota Department of Human Services, addressing issues of health disparities between white people and people of color.[7]

In 2000, Eller was named to the Vikings' 40th Anniversary Team and in 2010, he was named to the Vikings' 50th Anniversary team.In 2004, Eller was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[8] In 2006, Eller was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

Eller was arrested in 2006 for DUI and pleaded guilty.[9]

Eller was arrested in 2008 for fourth-degree assault of a police officer and second-degree refusal to submit to chemical testing, both gross misdemeanors.[10] He was sentenced and served 60 days in the county workhouse.[11]

References

  1. ^ Carl Eller at the College Football Hall of Fame
  2. ^ Greeks in Football Archived October 16, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ "NFL Champions 1920-2015". Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  4. ^ "Vikings.com Ring of Honor". Archived from the original on February 5, 2009. Retrieved December 2, 2007.
  5. ^ VIkings.com Archived November 1, 2005, at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ Pro Football Hall of Fame website
  7. ^ Carl Eller Takes a Stand, University of Minnesota Alumni Association, July–August 2005
  8. ^ ibid
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ [2]
  11. ^ [3]

External links

1962 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1962 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1962 Big Ten Conference football season. In their ninth year under head coach Murray Warmath, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–2–1 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 131 to 61. The team finished tenth in both the Associated Press and United Press International polls.

Tackle Bobby Bell received the team's Most Valuable Player award and the Outland Trophy. Bell, guard Julian Hook and end John Campbell were named All-Big Ten first team. Tackle Carl Eller and defensive end Bob Prawdzik were named All-Big Ten second team.Total attendance at six home games was 377,744, an average of 62,957 per game. The largest crowd was against Purdue.

1963 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1963 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1963 Big Ten Conference football season. The selectors for the 1963 season were the Associated Press (AP), based on a vote by media members, and the United Press International (UPI), based on a vote of the conference coaches. Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UPI are designated in bold.

Michigan State halfback Sherman Lewis was the only player to be unanimously selected by all ten of the conference coaches as a first-team honoree. Minnesota tackle Carl Eller and Illinois center Dick Butkus were selected as first-team players by nine of the ten conference coaches.

1963 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1963 Big Ten Conference football season was the 68th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1963 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1963 Illinois Fighting Illini football team, under head coach Pete Elliott, won the Big Ten football championship with a record of 8–1–1, defeated Washington in the 1964 Rose Bowl, and was ranked No. 3 in the final AP Poll. Illinois center Dick Butkus received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football award as the most valuable player in the conference and was a consensus first-team All-American.

The 1963 Michigan State Spartans football team, under head coach Duffy Daugherty, compiled a 6–2–1 record, finished in second place in the conference, led the conference in scoring defense (7.0 points allowed per game), and was ranked No. 10 in the final AP Poll. Halfback Sherman Lewis was a consensus first-team All-American and finished third in the voting of the 1963 Heisman Trophy.

The Big Ten's statistical leaders included Tom Myers of Northwestern with 1,398 passing yards, Tom Nowatzke of Indiana with 756 rushing yards, and Paul Krause of Iowa with 442 receiving yards. Carl Eller of Minnesota was the first Big Ten player selected in the 1964 NFL Draft with the sixth overall pick.

1963 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1963 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1963 Big Ten Conference football season. In their tenth year under head coach Murray Warmath, the Golden Gophers compiled a 3–6 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 117 to 95.Tackle Carl Eller received the team's Most Valuable Player award and was a consensus first-team All-American. Eller was also named All-Big Ten first team. Center Frank Marchiewski was named All-Big Ten second team. Offensive lineman Milt Sunde was named Academic All-Big Ten.Total attendance at five home games was 286,797, an average of 57,759 per game. The largest crowd was against Michigan.

1971 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1971 Minnesota Vikings season was the franchise's 11th season in the National Football League. The Vikings won the NFC Central title as they finished with a record of 11 wins and three losses, before losing to the eventual Super Bowl champion Dallas Cowboys at home, 20–12, in the NFC Divisional Playoff game.

In 2007, ESPN.com ranked the 1971 Vikings as the fourth-greatest defense in NFL history, saying, "[c]onsidering that their motto was 'Meet at the quarterback,' it's no surprise that the Purple People Eaters held opposing QBs to a 40.4 rating, one of the lowest ever." ESPN also noted that the 1971 Vikings "shut out three opponents, and only one team scored more than 20 points against them. As a result, Alan Page became the first defensive player to ever be named NFL MVP. Carl Eller, Jim Marshall and safety Paul Krause joined Page on the All-Pro team."

1984 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1984 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1984 Big Ten Conference football season. In their first year under head coach Lou Holtz, the Golden Gophers compiled a 4–7 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 316 to 194.Quarterback Rickey Foggie received the team's Most Valuable Player award. Linebacker Peter Najarian, punter Adam Kelly and offensive tackle Mark VonderHaar were named All-Big Ten second team. Linebacker Peter Najarian, defensive lineman Craig Paulson and running back David Puk were named Academic All-Big Ten.Mark VondeHaar was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Peter Najarian was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Strong safety Larry Joyner was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Center John Kelly was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Flanker Dwayne McMullen was awarded the Paul Giel Award. Total attendance for the season was 310,745, which averaged out to 51,791 per game. The season high for attendance was against rival Iowa.

1985 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1985 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1985 Big Ten Conference football season. In their second and final year under head coach Lou Holtz, the Golden Gophers compiled a 7–5 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 293 to 240.When former Minnesota head coach Lou Holtz left the Golden Gophers to coach at the University of Notre Dame, assistant John Gutekunst was tapped to coach the Golden Gophers in the Independence Bowl. Attendance was 42,845.Quarterback Rickey Foggie was named offensive player of the game, while linebacker Bruce Holmes was named defensive player of the game.

Center Ray Hitchcock, linebacker Peter Najarian, offensive guard Jon Lilleberg and strong safety Larry Joyner were named All-Big Ten second team. Running back David Puk was named Academic All-American second team. Puk and linebacker Peter Najarian were named Academic All-Big Ten.Quarterback Rickey Foggie was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Trophy. Ray Hitchcock was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Peter Najarian was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Kicker Chip Lohmiller was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Flanker . Andy Hare was awarded the Butch Nash Award. David Puk was awarded the Paul Giel Award.The total attendance was 426,918, which averaged out to 60,985 per game. The season high for attendance was against rival Wisconsin.

1986 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1986 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their first full year under head coach John Gutekunst, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–6 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 316 to 261. The team went to a second straight bowl game for the second time in school history (the first being the 1961 and 1962 Rose Bowls).Freshman tailback Darrell Thompson was named the Big Ten's freshman of the year. Thompson and kicker Chip Lohmiller were named All-Big Ten first team. Center Ray Hitchcock, Safety Larry Joyner and offensive linemen Jim Hobbins and Troy Wolkow were named All-Big Ten second team. Offensive lineman Paul Anderson, punter Brent Herbel and offensive lineman Jim Hobbins were named Academic All-Big Ten.Darrell Thompson was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award and Bruce Smith Award. Linebacker Mark Dusbabek was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Chip Lohmiller was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Offensive tackle Anthony Burke was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Offensive tackle Norries Wilson was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 335,150, which averaged out to 55,858 per game. The season high for attendance was against rival Iowa.

1987 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1987 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their second year under head coach John Gutekunst, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–5 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 262 to 257.Offensive guard Troy Wilkow was named All-Big Ten first team. Offensive lineman Paul Anderson, quarterback Rickey Foggie, tailback Darrell Thompson, kicker Chip Lohmiller and linebacker Jon Leverenz were named All-Big Ten second team. Punter Brent Herbel and offensive lineman Dan Liimatta were named Academic All-Big Ten.Foggie was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award. Darrell Thompson was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Jon Leverenz was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Chip Lohmiller was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Linebacker Brian Bonner was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Offensive tackle Dan Rechtin was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 371,809, which averaged out to 55,116 per game. The season high for attendance was against rival Wisconsin.

1988 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1988 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1988 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their third year under head coach John Gutekunst, the Golden Gophers compiled a 2–7–2 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 246 to 195. The tie against Illinois was the last tie for the Golden Gophers and under current NCAA rules, it will be the last in Golden Gophers history.

Punter Brent Herbel was named All-Big Ten second team. Punter Brent Herbel and offensive lineman Brent Liimatta were named Academic All-Big Ten.Wide receiver Chris Gaiters was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award and the Bruce Smith Award. Gaiters was selected as a 3rd team All-American. Strong safety Joel Brown was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Brent Herbel was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Defensive tackle Ross Ukkelberg was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Center Pat Hart was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 312,596, which averaged out to 44,657 per game. The season high for attendance was against rival Iowa.

1989 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1989 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1989 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fourth year under head coach John Gutekunst, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–5 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 283 to 263.Kicker Brent Berglund, offensive lineman Dan Liimata, tailback Darrell Thompson and defensive tackle Mike Sunvold were named All-Big Ten second team. Punter Brent Herbel was named Academic All-American. Running back Pat Cummings, punter Brent Herbel, offensive lineman Dan Liimatta, offensive lineman Jon Melander, quarterback Scott Schaffner and linebacker Joel Staats were named Academic All-Big Ten.Darrell Thompson was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award and Bruce Smith Award. Linebacker Eddie Miles was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Brent Berglund was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Dan Liimatta was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Jon Melander was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 237,552, which averaged out to 39,592 per game. The season high for attendance was against the Nebraska.

1990 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1990 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1990 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fifth year under head coach John Gutekunst, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–5 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 281 to 224.Center Chris Thome was named All-Big Ten first team. Offensive tackle Mike Sunvold and defensive back Sean Lumpkin were named All-Big Ten second team. Punter Brent Herbel was named Academic All-American. Quarterback Scott Schaffner and linebacker Joel Staats were named Academic All-Big Ten.Mike Sunvold was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award and Carl Eller Award. Quarterback Marquel Fleetwood was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Cornerback Kenneth Sebree was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Cornerback Frank Jackson was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Running back Jim King was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 243,511, which averaged out to 40,585 per game. The season high for attendance was against the Iowa.

1991 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1991 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1991 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their sixth year under head coach John Gutekunst, the Golden Gophers compiled a 2–9 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 302 to 104.Offensive linemen Chip Brixius, defensive back Chris Cohen, wide receiver Omar Douglas, linebacker Dan LiSanti, running back Ken McClintock, defensive back Jeff Rosga and linebacker Lance Wolkow were named Academic All-Big Ten.Defensive back Sean Lumpkin was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award and Carl Eller Award. Tight end Patt Evans was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Ken McClintock was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Linebacker Joel Staats was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Quarterback Scott Schaffner was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 218,219, which averaged out to 36,369 per game. The season high for attendance was against the San José State.

1992 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1992 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1992 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their first year under head coach Jim Wacker, the Golden Gophers compiled a 2–9 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 313 to 200.Offensive lineman Keith Ballard, defensive lineman Dennis Cappella and punter Dean Kaufman were named All-Big Ten second team. Defensive back Justin Conzemius, wide receiver Omar Douglas, defensive lineman Shawn Ehrich, offensive lineman Chris Fowlkes, linebacker Peter Hiestand, defensive back Dan LiSanti, defensive back Jeff Rosga and linebacker Lance Wolkow were named Academic All-Big Ten.Keith Ballard was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award. Running back Antonio Carter was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Dennis Cappella was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Wide receiver Jon Lewis was winner of the Bobby Bell Award. Linebacker Russ Heath was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Running back Ken McClintock was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 227,446, which averaged out to 37,908 per game. The season high for attendance was against rival Iowa.

1994 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1994 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1994 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their third year under head coach Jim Wacker, the Golden Gophers compiled a 3–8 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 348 to 256.Defensive tackle Ed Hawthorne and linebacker Broderick Hall were named All-Big Ten first team. Kicker Mike Chalberg was named All-Big Ten second team. Defensive back Justin Conzemius was named first team Academic All-American. Kicker Mike Chalberg, defensive back Justin Conzemius, offensive lineman Chris Fowlkes, offensive lineman Luke Glime, linebacker Luke Hiestand, offensive lineman Todd Jesewitz, linebacker Ben Langford, wide receiver Tony Levine, defensive back Dan LiSanti, linebacker Craig Sauer, quarterback Cory Sauter and linebacker Chris Smith were named Academic All-Big Ten.Chris Darkins was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award and Bruce Smith Award. Craig Sauer was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Free safety Rishon Early was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Justin Conzemius was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Ed Hawthorne was awarded the Paul Giel Award.The total attendance for the season was 253,851, which averaged to 42,308 per game. The season attendance high was against Iowa, with 53,340 in attendance.

1995 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1995 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1995 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fourth year under head coach Jim Wacker, the Golden Gophers compiled a 3–8 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 368 to 272.Offensive guard Todd Jesewitz and linebacker Broderick Hall (American football) were named All-Big Ten second team. Defensive back Justin Conzemius was named Academic All-American second team. Kicker Mike Chalberg, defensive back Justin Conzemius, defensive tackle Troy Duerr, offensive lineman Chris Fowlkes, linebacker Peter Hiestand, offensive lineman Todd Jesewitz, quarterback Rob Jones, wide receiver Tony Levine, defensive tackle Antoine Richard, linebacker Craig Sauer, quarterback Cory Sauter, linebacker Jim Tallman, defensive end Dave Watson, linebacker Parc Williams and long snapper Scott Williams were named Academic All-Big Ten.Craig Sauer was awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award and Carl Eller Award. Cory Sauter was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Mike Chalberg was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Justin Conzemius was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Running back Chris Darkins was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total home attendance for the season was 291,173, which averaged out to 48,529 per game. The season high for attendance was against Wisconsin.

1996 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1996 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1996 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fourth year under head coach Jim Wacker, the Golden Gophers compiled a 4–7 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 340 to 236.Linebacker Luke Braaten, offensive tackle James Elizondo, offensive guard Pat Hau, quarterback Rob Jones, long snapper Derek Rackley, cornerback Fred Rodgers, quarterback Cory Sauter, linebacker Jim Tallman, linebacker Parc Williams and quarterback Spergon Wynn were named Academic All-Big Ten.Wide receiver Ryan Thelwell and offensive tackle Gann Brooks were awarded the Bronko Nagurski Award. Wide receiver Tutu Atwell was awarded the Bruce Smith Award. Parc Williams was awarded the Carl Eller Award. Free safety Rishon Early was awarded the Bobby Bell Award. Cory Sauter was awarded the Butch Nash Award. Defensive tackle Jerome Davis was awarded the Paul Giel Award.Total attendance for the season was 261,113, which averaged out to 43,519 per game. The season high for attendance was again rival Iowa.

Dave Hill (American football)

David Harris Hill (born February 1, 1941) is a former American football player.

Hill was born in Lanett, Alabama and attended Lanett High School. He graduated in 1959 and attended Auburn University along with fellow Lanett High School alumnus, Bobby Hunt. Hunt played quarterback and defensive back while Hill played offensive and defensive line.

A 24th round draft choice in 1963 for the American Football League's Kansas City Chiefs, he wore jersey number 73. Hill went on to play 149 games in all with the Chiefs, the fourth most ever by a Kansas City offensive lineman. At one point, he did not miss a game for nine straight seasons.

He started for the Chiefs at right tackle in Super Bowl I and Super Bowl IV, earning two AFL Championship rings and a World Championship ring, and playing in the first (Super Bowl I) and last (Super Bowl IV) World Championships between the champions of the AFL and the NFL. In Super Bowl IV, he handled well one of the best defensive ends of that era, Carl Eller, a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, as the Chiefs rushed for 151 yards that day, for their only Super Bowl title to date.

Purple People Eaters

Purple People Eaters were the defensive line of the Minnesota Vikings from the late 1960s to the late 1970s. The term is a reference to a popular song from 1958, the efficiency of the defense, and the color of their uniforms. The motto of the Purple People Eaters was "Meet at the quarterback."

Defensive tackle Alan Page, 9 Pro Bowl Selections (1968–1976), NFL MVP (1971), Hall of Fame

Defensive end Carl Eller, 6 Pro Bowl Selections (1968–1971, 1973–1974) Hall of Fame

Defensive end Jim Marshall, 4 Pro Bowl Selections (1968–1971)

Defensive tackle Gary Larsen, 2 Pro Bowl Selections (1969–1970)One of the original members of the defensive line, Gary Larsen, was replaced in the mid-1970s by Doug Sutherland.Marshall said that the players disliked "Purple People Eaters" and called themselves "The Purple Gang", but "we've got to ride with it because it's our handle". The group was a major factor in the post-season success of the Vikings from the late 1960s through the 1970s. The Purple People Eaters were one of the most identifiable front fours in National Football League history, with the "Fearsome Foursome" of the Los Angeles Rams during the 1960s and early 1970s, the "Steel Curtain" of the Pittsburgh Steelers during the 1970s, and the "New York Sack Exchange" of the New York Jets during the 1980s.

Carl Eller and Alan Page were inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Many fans, players, coaches and sportswriters argue that Jim Marshall should be in the Hall of Fame as well.

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