Carl Brumbaugh

Carl Lowry Brumbaugh (September 22, 1906 – October 24, 1969) was an American college and professional football player who was a quarterback and halfback in the National Football League (NFL) for nine seasons in the 1930s. Brumbaugh played college football for Ohio State University and the University of Florida, and thereafter, he played professionally for the Chicago Bears, Cleveland Rams and Brooklyn Dodgers of the NFL.

Carl Brumbaugh
No. 8, 59
Position:Halfback, quarterback
Personal information
Born:September 22, 1906
West Milton, Ohio
Died:October 24, 1969 (aged 63)
West Milton, Ohio
Height:5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Weight:170 lb (77 kg)
Career information
High school:West Milton (OH)
College:Ohio State & Florida
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Passing yards:656
Passing TDs:9
Rushing yards:25
Rushing TDs:1
Receiving yards:357
Receiving TDs:4
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Brumbaugh was born in West Milton, Ohio in 1906,[1] and attended West Milton High School.[2]

College career

After graduating from high school, he attended Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio and then the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, where he played for the Ohio State Buckeyes football team and the Florida Gators football team, respectively.[2][3] He played for the Gators in 1926, 1927, and 1928,[4] and Brumbaugh, Rainey Cawthon, Clyde Crabtree and Royce Goodbread were members of the 1928 Gators' "Phantom Four" backfield that helped the team lead the country with 336 points scored.[3][5] The Gators finished the 1928 season 8–1, losing only to the Tennessee Volunteers by a single point, 13–12.[3] Brumbaugh was later inducted into the University of Florida Athletic Hall of Fame as a "Gator Great."[6]

Professional career

During his nine-year NFL career, he played for the Chicago Bears from 1930 to 1936, the Cleveland Rams in 1937, the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1937, and finished with the Bears in 1937 and 1938.[7] Brumbaugh was a member of the legendary early 1930s Bears teams that included future hall of famers Red Grange and Bronco Nagurski, won the NFL Championships in 1932 and 1933, and played for a third in 1934.

Brumbaugh died in his hometown of West Milton, Ohio on October 24, 1969; he was 63 years old.

See also

References

  1. ^ Pro-Football-Reference.com, Players, Carl Brumbaugh. Retrieved July 5, 2010.
  2. ^ a b databaseFootball.com, Players, Carl Brumbaugh Archived February 17, 2010, at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved June 1, 2010.
  3. ^ a b c Tom McEwen, The Gators: A Story of Florida Football, The Strode Publishers, Huntsville, Alabama, pp. 86–103 (1974).
  4. ^ 2012 Florida Football Media Guide Archived May 27, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, University Athletic Association, Gainesville, Florida, pp. 95 & 176 (2012). Retrieved September 16, 2012.
  5. ^ "Florida Gets Good At Gridiron Sport," The Pittsburgh Press (December 4, 1928). Retrieved January 19, 2013.
  6. ^ F Club, Hall of Fame, Gator Greats. Retrieved December 13, 2014.
  7. ^ National Football League, Historical Players, Carl Brumbaugh. Retrieved May 28, 2010.

Bibliography

  • Carlson, Norm, University of Florida Football Vault: The History of the Florida Gators, Whitman Publishing, LLC, Atlanta, Georgia (2007). ISBN 0-7948-2298-3.
  • Golenbock, Peter, Go Gators! An Oral History of Florida's Pursuit of Gridiron Glory, Legends Publishing, LLC, St. Petersburg, Florida (2002). ISBN 0-9650782-1-3.
  • Hairston, Jack, Tales from the Gator Swamp: A Collection of the Greatest Gator Stories Ever Told, Sports Publishing, LLC, Champaign, Illinois (2002). ISBN 1-58261-514-4.
  • McCarthy, Kevin M., Fightin' Gators: A History of University of Florida Football, Arcadia Publishing, Mount Pleasant, South Carolina (2000). ISBN 978-0-7385-0559-6.
  • McEwen, Tom, The Gators: A Story of Florida Football, The Strode Publishers, Huntsville, Alabama (1974). ISBN 0-87397-025-X.
  • Nash, Noel, ed., The Gainesville Sun Presents The Greatest Moments in Florida Gators Football, Sports Publishing, Inc., Champaign, Illinois (1998). ISBN 1-57167-196-X.

External links

1927 Florida Gators football team

The 1927 Florida Gators football team represented the University of Florida in the sport of American football during the 1927 Southern Conference football season. The season was Harold Sebring's third and last season as the head coach of the Florida Gators football team. After suffering a 0–12 upset loss at the hands of the Davidson College Wildcats, the Gators rallied to defeat the Auburn Tigers 33–6, defeating the Tigers for the first time and ending a six-game losing streak, and to upset coach Wallace Wade's Alabama Crimson Tide 13–6. Sebring's 1927 Florida Gators finished 7–3 overall, and 5–2 in the Southern Conference, placing sixth of twenty-two teams in the conference standings.The loss to Davidson featured captain Frank Oosterhoudt, who was later declared ineligible, and replaced at captain by Bill Middlekauff. With Middlekauff at captain, the Gators suffered just two further losses: to conference co-champions NC State; and to Georgia's "Dream and Wonder team". NC State was led by Hall of Famer and Gainesville native Jack McDowall.

1928 Florida Gators football team

The 1928 Florida Gators football team represented the University of Florida in the sport of American football during the 1928 Southern Conference football season. The season was future Hall-of-Famer Charlie Bachman's first of five as the team's head coach. The Gators finished 8–1 overall, and 6–1 in the Southern Conference (SoCon), placing third of twenty-three teams in the conference, behind the national champion Georgia Tech Golden Tornado (7–0 SoCon), and the Tennessee Volunteers (6–0–1 SoCon).The Gators led the nation in scoring with 336 points, and were remembered by many sports commentators as the best Florida football team until at least the 1960s. The large scores were mostly due to its "Phantom Four" backfield which included: quarterback Clyde Crabtree, halfbacks Carl Brumbaugh and Royce Goodbread, and fullback Rainey Cawthon. Other backs who were key contributors included: captain Goof Bowyer, sophomore halfback Lee Roy "Red" Bethea, alternate-captain and halfback Tommy Owens, and fullback Ed Sauls. One account reads: "There were twelve backs on the squad. Six of them can do the hundred in 10.1 seconds. Eight of them are fine punters and ten of them are great passers. And all of them are good receivers."At ends were future coach Dutch Stanley, and Florida's first-ever, first-team All-American, Dale Van Sickel. Van Sickel and quarterback Crabtree, who was ambidextrous and could throw passes with either hand, or punt with either foot, while on the run or stationary, were both unanimous All-Southern selections.

Among the many football highlights of 1928 were the Gators' 26–6 victory over the Georgia Bulldogs, which ended a six-game losing streak versus the Bulldogs, and the controversial loss to Tennessee ending their bid at an undefeated season and possible Rose Bowl berth.

1930 Chicago Bears season

The 1930 Chicago Bears season was the team's 11th regular season completed as a member the National Football League.

1934 Chicago Bears season

The 1934 Chicago Bears season was the team's 15th regular season and 3rd postseason completed in the National Football League. The club posted an unprecedented 13–0 record in the second year of George Halas's second tenure.

The season began with startling success, as the Bears reeled off nine straight wins in which they scored 20 or more points each game while allowing more than 7 points only twice. The last four wins were more difficult, including a tough win over the Giants in New York and back-to-back home-and-away close victories over the Detroit Lions in that franchise's first year in Detroit. The Bears outscored opponents 286–86, and became the first team to go unbeaten and untied in the NFL's regular season.

The Bears won the NFL Western Division title for the second straight year and met the NFL Eastern Division champion New York Giants once again in the NFL Championship game. The Bears were denied perfection as the Giants went on to win what would become known as the "Sneakers Game".

Bob Perina

Robert Ian Perina (January 16, 1921 – August 2, 1991) was an American football running back, quarterback and defensive back in the National Football League. He played for the New York Yankees, Brooklyn Dodgers, Chicago Rockets, Chicago Bears and Baltimore Colts. He played college football for the Princeton Tigers.

Bob Williams (quarterback)

Robert Allen Williams (January 2, 1930 – May 26, 2016) was an American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL).

Brumbaugh

Brumbaugh is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Carl Brumbaugh (1906–1969), American football quarterback

Clement L. Brumbaugh (1863–1921), U.S. Representative from Ohio

Cliff Brumbaugh (born 1974), American baseball player

David Brumbaugh (1960-2017), American politician

D. Emmert Brumbaugh (1894–1977), Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania

John Brombaugh (born 1937), American pipe organ builder

Martin Grove Brumbaugh (1862–1930), Pennsylvania's 25th Governor, a Republican

Dick Flanagan

Richard E. Flanagan (October 31, 1927 in Sidney, Ohio – September 27, 1997) was a National Football League center who played eight seasons. He also played RB in college and his first year with the Bears, LB until his last 2 years in the game, and OG also.

Joey Sternaman

Joseph Theodore Sternaman (February 1, 1900 – March 10, 1988) was a professional American football player, born in Springfield, Illinois, who played quarterback for nine seasons for the Chicago Bears and Duluth Kelleys. At 5'6" and 135 pounds he was called "the strongest little man I ever met" by sportswriter Grantland Rice. He played quarterback during the years Red Grange starred with the Bears. In 1926, he was the quarterback, head coach, and owner of the Chicago Bulls of the first American Football League. Joey was also the brother of Chicago Bears co-owner Dutch Sternaman.

List of Chicago Bears starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Bears.

Noah Mullins

Noah Walker Mullins (May 23, 1918 – October 31, 1998) was an American football running back, quarterback and defensive back in the National Football League. He played for the Chicago Bears and New York Giants. He played college football for the Kentucky Wildcats.

Pard Pearce

Walter Irving "Pard" Pearce (October 23, 1896 – May 24, 1974) was a professional American football player who played quarterback for six seasons for the Decatur Staleys, the Chicago Staleys, the Chicago Bears, the Kenosha Maroons, and the Providence Steam Roller. Pearce was the first starting quarterback for the Bears in team history.

Rainey Cawthon

Rainey Blackwell Cawthon (October 30, 1907 – April 11, 1991) was an American football player and coach for the Florida Gators of the University of Florida. Cawthon was a member of Florida's "Phantom Four" backfield with Clyde Crabtree, Carl Brumbaugh, and Royce Goodbread in 1928 which led the nation with 336 points scored. He was also captain of the 1929 Florida team, and selected second-team for the composite All-Southern that year. He was inducted into the University of Florida Athletic Hall of Fame as a "Gator Great." Cawthon was also active in the affairs of Florida State University, and was elected to the FSU Hall of Fame in 1987.

Shane Matthews

Michael Shane Matthews (born June 1, 1970) is an American former college and professional football player who was a quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for all or part of fourteen seasons during the 1990s and 2000s. He played college football for the University of Florida, and thereafter, he played professionally for the Chicago Bears, Washington Redskins, and four other NFL teams. Since retiring as a player, Matthews has lived near his college alma mater in North Central Florida, where he has hosted a sports talk radio program and coached high school football. In 2017, Matthew pled guilty to having a small part in a large health care fraud organized by former Florida teammate Monty Grow.

Steve Bradley (American football)

Steven Carl Bradley (born July 16, 1963) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. He played for the Chicago Bears. He played college football for the Indiana Hoosiers.

Tom Farris

Thomas George Farris (September 16, 1920 – November 16, 2002) was an American football quarterback who played for the Chicago Bears (1946–1947) in National Football League the Chicago Rockets (1948) in the All-America Football Conference.

After playing college football at the University of Wisconsin, Farris was an 11th round selection (99th overall pick) of the 1942 NFL Draft by the Green Bay Packers. But before training camp, he enlisted in the United States Coast Guard to serve in World War II. He played 33 regular season games over 3 seasons. In 1946, which was his best season, he had 1 passing touchdown, 2 pass interceptions, 1 reception and 16 receiving yards.

Wally Brown (American football)

Wallace Brown was a college football player for coach Dutch Stanley's Florida Gators in 1933 and 1934. He was second-team All-SEC in 1934.

Carl Brumbaugh—championships, awards and honors

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