Capture of the brig Brillante

The Capture of the brig Brillante occurred around 1832 and was considered a significant feat in the Blockade of Africa. Brillante was a slave ship that the British Royal Navy succeeded in capturing after two failed attempts. The brig had a crew of sixty men and was armed with ten guns. Brillante was under the command of an English captain named Homans when she was seized. Homans was an experienced slaver who in ten cruises had landed 5,000 slaves on the coasts of Brazil and Cuba. Brillante reportedly fought at least two battles against the British anti-slavery patrols. She allegedly forced the crew of one British cruiser to abandon ship after a bloody action and on a different occasion, she repulsed boats from a Royal Navy sloop-of-war.

Finally, four navy vessels trapped Brillante by surrounding her. Just before his capture, Captain Homans murdered around 600 slaves by ordering that their hands be tied to the ship's anchor and that they be thrown over the side. The Britons who captured the ship arrived just after the incident and took control without resistance.[1][2][3]

Capture of the brig Brillante
Part of the Suppression of the Slave Trade
AfricanSlavesTransport

"Slave Trade in Africa"
Date1832
Location
Result British victory, Brillante captured.
Belligerents
 United Kingdom African Slave Traders

See also

Citations and references

Citations
  1. ^ Spears, pg. 145-146
  2. ^ Soodalter, pg. 21
  3. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-05. Retrieved 2011-04-25.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
References
  • Spears, R. John (1900). The American slave-trade: an account of its origin, growth and suppression. University of California: C. Scribner's Sons.
  • Soodalter, Ron (2006). Hanging Captain Gordon: the life and trial of an American slave trader. Simon and Schuster Publishing. ISBN 0-7432-6727-3.
Attack on Veracruz

The attack on Veracruz was a 1683 raid against the port of Veracruz, in the Viceroyalty of New Spain (colonial Mexico). It was led by pirates Laurens de Graaf, Nicholas van Hoorn and Michel de Grammont.

Captain Stingaree

Captain Stingaree is a fictional supervillain in the DC Comics universe, and a minor foe of the Batman. He first appeared in Detective Comics #460 (June 1976), and was created by Bob Rozakis, Michael Uslan and Ernie Chan.

Diabolito

Diabolito or Little Devil (died July 1823) was a 19th-century Cuban pirate. One of the more violent of the era, he engaged the United States Navy and was one of the main fugitives pursued during later American naval expeditions in the Caribbean during the 1820s.

Eli Boggs

Eli Boggs (fl. mid 19th century) was an American pirate, one of the last active ocean-going pirates operating off the coast of China during the 1850s. Based near Hong Kong, Boggs constantly raided outgoing clipper ships carrying highly valuable cargo of opium throughout the decade. He is most particularly known for his cruelty, as in one recorded incident he had the body of a captured Chinese merchant cut into small pieces and had them delivered to shore in small buckets as a warning against interference in his criminal activities. In 1857, after a violent and bloody siege, Boggs was forced to swim ashore after his junk was destroyed by rival pirates. However, after holding his captors at bay with a knife, Boggs was finally apprehended and imprisoned in a Hong Kong jail for three years, eventually being tried for murder before his deportation to the United States.

Emanuel Wynn

Emanuel Wynn was a French pirate of the 18th century, and is often considered the first pirate to fly the Jolly Roger.

Fancy (ship)

Fancy was Henry Every's ship, and was commanded by him between May 1694 to late 1695, when he retired from piracy and the fate of Fancy becomes unknown.

George Lowther (pirate)

George Lowther (died 1723) was an 18th-century English pirate who, although little is known of his life, was active in the Caribbean and Atlantic. One of his lieutenants was Edward Low.

Hendrick Lucifer

Hendrick Jacobszoon Lucifer (1583–1627) was a Dutch-born pirate.Hendrick's last name, Lucifer, referred to a lighting stick, not to the fallen angel Lucifer, and was most likely used as a nickname due to his use of fire and smoke to surprise enemies.

Liang Daoming

Liang Daoming (Chinese: 梁道明; pinyin: Liáng Dàomíng; Cantonese Yale: Lèuhng Douh-mìng) was an abscondee of the Chinese Ming Dynasty who became king of Palembang in Srivijaya. He hailed from Guangdong province and was of Cantonese descent. According to the Ming records, he had thousands of followers and a sizable military contingent in Palembang. Liang Daoming's rule over Palembang was acknowledged by the Ming emperor and protected by Zheng He's armada (1403-1424).

List of privateers

A privateer was a private person or private warship authorized by a country's government by letters of marque to attack foreign shipping. Privateers were an accepted part of naval warfare from the 16th to the 19th centuries, authorised by all significant naval powers.

Notable privateers included:

Victual Brothers or Vitalians or Likedeelers 1360–1401

Gödeke Michels (leader of the Likedeelers) 1360–1401

Klaus Störtebeker, Wismar, (leader of the Likedeelers), 1360–1401

Didrik Pining, German, c. 1428–1491

Paul Beneke, German, born in Hanseatic City of Danzig, Pomerelia c. 1440s–1490s

Kemal Reis, Turkish, c. 1451–1511

Oruç Reis (Barbarossa), Turkish, c. 1474–1518

Barbarossa Hayreddin Pasha, Turkish, 1478–1546

Turgut Reis (Dragut), Turkish, c. 1485–1565

Timoji, Hindu, 1496–1513

Murat Reis the Older, Turkish, c. 1506–1609

Sir Francis Drake, English, c. 1540–1596

Sir George Somers, English 1554–1610

Captain Christopher Newport, English, c. 1561–1617

Magnus Heinason, Faroese, c. 1568–1578 privateer in Dutch service under the Dutch revolt and 1580s, and privateer and merchant in Danish service on the Faroe Islands c. 1578–1589

Piet Hein, Dutch, 1577–1629

Alonso de Contreras, Spanish, 1582–1641, privateer against the Turks under the banner of the Order of Malta and later commanded Spanish ships

James Erisey, English, 1585–1590s

Peter Easton, England/Newfoundland, c. 1611–1614

Sir Henry Morgan, Welsh, 1635–1688

Jean Bart, French, 1651–1702

William Dampier, English, 1652–1715

Nicolas Baeteman, Dunkirker 1659–1720

Alexander Dalzeel, Scotland, c. 1662–1715

René Duguay-Trouin, French, 1673–1736

Kanhoji Angre, Maratha, 1698–1729

Lars Gathenhielm, Swedish, 1710–1718

Ingela Gathenhielm, Swedish, 1710/18–1721

Fortunatus Wright, English of Liverpool, 1712–1757

David Hawley, colonial United States, 1741–1807

Jonathan Haraden, colonial United States, 1744–1803

William Death, English, 1756

Alexander Godfrey, colonial Nova Scotia, 1756–1803

Jose Campuzano-Polanco, colonial Santo Domingo, 1689-1760

Etienne Pellot, aka "the Basque Fox", French, 1765–1856

Noah Stoddard, United States, 1755-1850

Robert Surcouf, French, 1773–1827

David McCullough, colonial United States, 1777-1778

Jean Gaspard Vence, French, –1783

Joseph Barss, Colonial Nova Scotia, 1776–1824

Jean Lafitte 1776–1854, French Louisiana hero in the Gulf of Mexico

John Ordronaux (privateer), United States, 1778–1841

Ephraim Sturdivant, United States, 1782–1868

Hipólito Bouchard, Argentina, 1783–1843

Louisa, ship, of Philadelphia United States, 1800s during Quasi-War with the French

Otway Burns, North Carolina, United States 1775–1850

Mansel Alcantra

Mansel Alcantra or Alcantara (fl. 1829) was a Spanish pirate active in the South Atlantic during the early 19th century. As well as committing acts of piracy, he carried out several incidents of mass murder. The most infamous of these acts occurred in 1829 when his brig, the Macrinarian, captured the Liverpool packet ship Topaz near St. Helena while en route from Calcutta to Boston. After he and his men had finished looting the ship, Alcantara had the entire crew murdered.That same year, he seized and plundered a United States ship, the Candace from Marblehead. The ship's supercargo, allegedly an amateur actor, disguised himself as a Roman Catholic priest by dressing in a black gown and broad rimmed hat. He waited in his cabin pretending to "tell his beads" and, when the pirates finally entered his cabin, they respectfully crossed themselves and left the room. The young man was the only one of the crew and passengers not robbed by the pirates.

No purchase, no pay

"No purchase, no pay" (or "no prey, no pay") was a phrase used by pirates and privateers, of the 17th century in particular, to describe the conditions under which participants were expected to join expeditions or raids. The phrase describes a remuneration arrangement similar to a commission.

Pierre le Grand (pirate)

Pierre Le Grand (French: Peter the Great) was a French buccaneer of the 17th century. He is known to history only from one source, Alexandre Exquemelin's Buccaneers of America, and may be imaginary.

Raid on Cartagena (1683)

The raid on Cartagena was the successful counter-attack against vessels sent to defend the city of Cartagena de Indias (modern-day Colombia) and the subsequent blockade of the city by Laurens de Graaf and his pirate compatriots.

Silver (Andrew Motion novel)

Silver: Return to Treasure Island, is a novel by former British Poet Laureate Andrew Motion, published by Jonathan Cape on 15 March 2012. The book follows Jim Hawkins, son of the character of the same name in Robert Louis Stevenson's 1883 novel Treasure Island, as he and Nat, daughter of Long John Silver, also a character in Treasure Island, return to the island visited by their fathers to claim abandoned bar silver.

Space pirate

Space pirates are a type of stock character from science fiction.

The Angel's Command

The Angel's Command is a 2003 novel by Brian Jacques, author of the popular children's series Redwall, and the sequel to Castaways of the Flying Dutchman. It follows the adventures of an immortal boy and his dog as they face pirates and other dangers from the high seas to the mountains.

Timber pirate

In the United States, a timber pirate is a pirate engaged in the illegal logging industry.

Timeline of piracy

This is a timeline of the history of piracy.

1600s: 1600 - 1601 - 1602 - 1603 - 1604 - 1605 - 1606 - 1607 - 1608 - 1609

1610s: 1610 - 1611 - 1612 - 1613 - 1614 - 1615 - 1616 - 1617 - 1618 - 1619

1620s: 1620 - 1621 - 1622 - 1623 - 1624 - 1625 - 1626 - 1627 - 1628 - 1629

1630s: 1630 - 1631 - 1632 - 1633 - 1634 - 1635 - 1636 - 1637 - 1638 - 1639

1640s: 1640 - 1641 - 1642 - 1643 - 1644 - 1645 - 1646 - 1647 - 1648 - 1649

1650s: 1650 - 1651 - 1652 - 1653 - 1654 - 1655 - 1656 - 1657 - 1658 - 1659

1660s: 1660 - 1661 - 1662 - 1663 - 1664 - 1665 - 1666 - 1667 - 1668 - 1669

1670s: 1670 - 1671 - 1672 - 1673 - 1674 - 1675 - 1676 - 1677 - 1678 - 1679

1680s: 1680 - 1681 - 1682 - 1683 - 1684 - 1685 - 1686 - 1687 - 1688 - 1689

1690s: 1690 - 1691 - 1692 - 1693 - 1694 - 1695 - 1696 - 1697 - 1698 - 1699

1700s: 1700 - 1701 - 1702 - 1703 - 1704 - 1705 - 1706 - 1707 - 1708 - 1709

1710s: 1710 - 1711 - 1712 - 1713 - 1714 - 1715 - 1716 - 1717 - 1718 - 1719

1720s: 1720 - 1721 - 1722 - 1723 - 1724 - 1725 - 1726 - 1727 - 1728 - 1729

1730s: 1730 - 1731 - 1732 - 1733 - 1734 - 1735 - 1736 - 1737 - 1738 - 1739

1740s: 1740 - 1741 - 1742 - 1743 - 1744 - 1745 - 1746 - 1747 - 1748 - 1749

1750s: 1750 - 1751 - 1752 - 1753 - 1754 - 1755 - 1756 - 1757 - 1758 - 1759

1760s: 1760 - 1761 - 1762 - 1763 - 1764 - 1765 - 1766 - 1767 - 1768 - 1769

1770s: 1770 - 1771 - 1772 - 1773 - 1774 - 1775 - 1776 - 1777 - 1778 - 1779

1780s: 1780 - 1781 - 1782 - 1783 - 1784 - 1785 - 1786 - 1787 - 1788 - 1789

1790s: 1790 - 1791 - 1792 - 1793 - 1794 - 1795 - 1796 - 1797 - 1798 - 1799

1800s: 1800 - 1801 - 1802 - 1803 - 1804 - 1805 - 1806 - 1807 - 1808 - 1809

1810s: 1810 - 1811 - 1812 - 1813 - 1814 - 1815 - 1816 - 1817 - 1818 - 1819

1820s: 1820 - 1821 - 1822 - 1823 - 1824 - 1825 - 1826 - 1827 - 1828 - 1829

1830s: 1830 - 1831 - 1832 - 1833 - 1834 - 1835 - 1836 - 1837 - 1838 - 1839

1840s: 1840 - 1841 - 1842 - 1843 - 1844 - 1845 - 1846 - 1847 - 1848 - 1849

1850s: 1850 - 1851 - 1852 - 1853 - 1854 - 1855 - 1856 - 1857 - 1858 - 1859

1860s: 1860 - 1861 - 1862 - 1863 - 1864 - 1865 - 1866 - 1867 - 1868 - 1869

1870s: 1870 - 1871 - 1872 - 1873 - 1874 - 1875 - 1876 - 1877 - 1878 - 1879

1880s: 1880 - 1881 - 1882 - 1883 - 1884 - 1885 - 1886 - 1887 - 1888 - 1889

1890s: 1890 - 1891 - 1892 - 1893 - 1894 - 1895 - 1896 - 1897 - 1898 - 1899

1900s: 1900 - 1901 - 1902 - 1903 - 1904 - 1905 - 1906 - 1907 - 1908 - 1909

1910s: 1910 - 1911 - 1912 - 1913 - 1914 - 1915 - 1916 - 1917 - 1918 - 1919

1920s: 1920 - 1921 - 1922 - 1923 - 1924 - 1925 - 1926 - 1927 - 1928 - 1929

1930s: 1930 - 1931 - 1932 - 1933 - 1934 - 1935 - 1936 - 1937 - 1938 - 1939

1940s: 1940 - 1941 - 1942 - 1943 - 1944 - 1945 - 1946 - 1947 - 1948 - 1949

1950s: 1950 - 1951 - 1952 - 1953 - 1954 - 1955 - 1956 - 1957 - 1958 - 1959

1960s: 1960 - 1961 - 1962 - 1963 - 1964 - 1965 - 1966 - 1967 - 1968 - 1969

1970s: 1970 - 1971 - 1972 - 1973 - 1974 - 1975 - 1976 - 1977 - 1978 - 1979

1980s: 1980 - 1981 - 1982 - 1983 - 1984 - 1985 - 1986 - 1987 - 1988 - 1989

1990s: 1990 - 1991 - 1992 - 1993 - 1994 - 1995 - 1996 - 1997 - 1998 - 1999

2000s: 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 - 2006 - 2007 - 2008 - 2009

2010s: 2010 - 2011 - 2012 - 2013 - 2014 - 2015 - 2016 - 2017

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